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Fort Wayne Times Newspaper Archive: March 1, 1855 - Page 1

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   Fort Wayne Times (Newspaper) - March 1, 1855, Fort Wayne, Indiana                                 BY JOHN W. DAWSON.]  VOLUME 15.  FEAKîitli^M.y TO xVDVOCATf] AMI DEFr^XD TRUTÎl AM) ÎÎEPîlCiîEXD EUIÍOR,  [AT S2.00 PER YEAR.  FORT WAYNE, I  ANA, TILURSDAY  ING, MARCH 1. 1855.  NUMBER 26.  FORT WAYNE TIMES  >  V.-  y /  From the Louisville Journil.  The Maiden's Destiny.  The earth had welcomed that, calm hour That woos the maiden to her bower; The sky had changed ils blushing hue, And melted to a deep dark blue. While o'er the vale and on the hill The evening star was trembling still, So ileeT.ly bright, so softly fair It seenied airheavcn was glowing there. Ti e spot was lovely and serene-Hung round with vine and leaves of green, With here and there an opening made For the low wind's sweet serenade— Yet not for winds alone, for there Was one whose girlish brow was fair As star-light waves. And by her side Knelt one whose soul's unfathomed tide— Whose dreams, whose hopes of future years. Whose earliest love was hers—all hers. But on her lip there was no tone In soothing answer to his own; His heart leaped with tumultuous thrill. But her's was cold, and calm, and sti 1, Save when she met that burning glance— . Then came a momentary trance Of inward agony. It passed; The quivering lash was downward cast And though the cheek was juSt as.fair, A tear—one only—trembled theife 'Twasdashed aside!—why weep m vain. And thus add torture to the pain? Her soul too long bad nursed a care. That lore could never win or share. The struggle passed with that wild teat— The lover bowed his lis'.'ning ear. As though a poet's glorious lyre Was trembling on her lips of fire.  I would that thou hadst loved me les«,  Or I had dared to love thee more; K •would have spared the deep distress Which thou must feel and 1 deplore.  It might have plucked earth's brightest flowers, And made their fragrance all thine own-It would have spared the saddest hours This untamed heart has ever known.  Or had it been my destiny  To haply love as others may, My spini would have chosen thee As one who wins not to betray.  I might have loveiJ! My soul has been  All hope and trust and passion too, But knowledge plucked iway the screen. And all alik« were found untrue.  It told me human love was bright,  Andsonjctiraes deatlile.s.'- as the soul' Butoftener fades as yon false light  Fades from the heaven's unclouded scroll.  *Tis well for those who every hour  Can love, furgel—then love again. But for the soul that feels ils power. Life is too dark, for hope is vain.  I knew my heart could nurse despair—  I dared not woo affection's dream. And uow the only hope that's there is proud ambition's daring theme.  My soaring hopes must only rest  Above mortality's dull late. Then should the lightning scathe my breast The fatal truth will come too late.  Farewell!—'twere swe« t to have thee here,  But fortiiy sou) s unwhispeied strife— This moment, though it wius no tear. Is still the darkest of my life.  And thus they parted. One deep sigh-One mournful glance of that dark eye-One wail low as the wind's soft moan— One parting word and he was gone. With this sad truth, time now could bleat Witi but one boon—forgetfulness. And she a moment bowed her head. As o'er her cheek a pallor spread Like unto death. That grief was past. It was the bitterest, and the last That love could claim- Her destiny Was half fulfilled—her soul was free; Her unchained spirit let to spring Free as the eagle's dauntless wing Tbat mounts the tempest—sweeps the air— Earth has no chain to t^ind it there.  Sallie A. Reedv.  Florence, Ala.. Jan. 1855.  Wilt Tbou JLove taer Still.  Xi'ilt thou loTe her still, when the sunny curls.  That over her bosom flow. Will be placed with the silver threads of age  Ani her step falls sad and low? Wilt tbou love her still, when the summer's smiles On her lips no longer live? «I will love her still, With right good will." •Piiok wilt loTe her still? then our cherished one. To thy sheltering arras we give.  Wilt thou love her still when her changeful eyes  Have grown dim with sorrow's rain? When the bOsom that beats against thine own.  Throbs slow with the weight of pain? When her silvery laugh rings out ao more And vanish her youthful charms? 'With free good wilt, I shall love her still!' Thou wilt love her still? then our dearest one We give to thy loving arms.  Remember no frief has she ever known,  Her spirit is light and free; None other, with ialterless step, has prest  Its innermost shades, but thee! Tkeii wilt tbou love her still, when the thoughts Of youth in their blushing bloom depart? 'Through good and ill, I will love her still!' Thou wilt love her still? then our darling take To the joy of thy noble heart!  Remember, for thee does she smiling leave  The friends of her early days— No longer to meet their approving looks. Nor their fond, unfeigned praise. Forgive her, then, if the tears fall fast. And promise to love her well, •I will love her still. With right good will!' Thou wilt love her stilW then with peaceful trust We our sobbing sorrows quell.  When Irei father is dead, and the emerald sod  Lies soft on her mother's breast; When her brother's voice is no longer heard.  And her sister's hushed to rest— Wilt thou love her still? lor to thee she looks. Her star on life's troubled sea! 'I will love her still,^ Through good and ill!' With marriage vow on her youthful lip. Then we give our child to thee!  The Methodist Book Co.n'Cern Xortii and South.—The Southern Methodist ChurcD suit against the MctliucJist Book Concern in this city, was on Friduy last si^ttlcd amicably by the ^•'^int commission now in s'j.ssion in our city, which is thus composed: For the South, Rev. A. L. P. Green, W. L. Smith, and C. B. Parsons. For the Cincinnati branch of the Book Concern, Rev. J. F. Wright, M- Mailay, E. Thomson, and the Agents here, Sworrastead& Co. Tiie terms of adjustment, we learn, are as follows:  The Book Concern is to pay the Methodist Episcopal Church South eighty llious-and dollars, and the Southern debts; 820,-000 in stock, and the balance in cash—Slo,-000 down, the remainder in instalments of one, two, three, four and five years. It is understood that the Book Concern pays the taxable costs yet duo, and that they indorse the debts and notes of the Southern preachers without recourse.  As to all other costs, each party pays%s Ofrn.  The final decree will be published before long. ___  The Immacolate Conception in Europe. —A new of order knighthood is to be established in France, to be entitled the "Order of the Inamaculate Conception." The Paris «orrepondent of ihe London Atlas says it is to be confined to the noblesse. Each member iS^Smpglled to /'i'-nish eight quarterings of nobility, if purely French, and IGif mi.Ked with Vldod. Tl^ dogma of the Immaculate Conception Wsaid to meet with considerable opppjiidn in several Ettropcan countries.  .'/{irirr.-'. as in ciifi^- nj' the cor¡/. usury lairs tdi'j^fthrr.  As limy l'n\u tin:'! niUnittc,! tlio propriety cf modilyinir or ti.fn in r.<-!ii-) r.^.pr'?, why  not in all? If Ilio lufii'.i.L'i is uf r.HÜrc;t.'s and onnali, wlm-o iiitirost i.-^ n ;;i> '.c (ir.ii di\i(ltd, l'an bo BÜiiwed tu tiitthe t-',;i.'!i lür^.-iMi.'-; Ibr ilio U5-Ü cf nunu'y lortl.cir cr.iipntiios n;- lii' y |-l^f.^(•, why may not yuiix iJuc.!?, wIidku imt-rc'BÎH r.rc' tüfcct and ininiuiiiiiit.', and nrucli n;ciro eloFt-.'y u'Btclicd and cared ror,bu allowed to do the gaiiiu . thill  Frniii tlie North Amorican.  The irssu-y ."^o. v'.  T/icir ^-¡¿fiirdifi/, Inconsi/lcncn, and Jv.rqvulili/.  The usage of the world has so far rccognizcd the legality and moriilili/ of taking comi'GiiBa-tion for till' use of money, that no man ut tfie present day would havo tho iiardihoiui to deny either; and tlie soveral Slatoa of tlio riiioM, hy their onftctments, have aciiiiiUotl siicli moral right, and made it If^al for the lerulerof money to receive some comptintiation for its iit^c.  They havo prescribed tlio limits of tho prices, nlthough'thoso prices vary groatiy in extent; sniao States doolaringf by law that six dollars is the full amount, under all oireuniftuncBP, that may bo given for tho use of one hundred do), lars for a year, whilst others have fixed difiur-Gnt rates, varying from five por cent to twelve, or havo lofl the rates unlimited, and to ngroo-ment between tho borrower and lender.  It is to be presumed iliat there is a reason for these limitatione, othorwiso thoy would not have been enacted.  The restrietionists contend that it is noees-sary to mako those regulations, and to tix tneso j for an nmplo soooritv; and v. hut is t!. rates of interest to protect tlia borrow er "  niions cil: il, Ihe  «Mìo Vf li í./ntí':' íVom Kiiruiie. rs'i;w Yi.:.:i. L'cb. 21.—Tav Üalric «rrivcd hero  to-dí;} , \vi:ii ! <! 5;  t.'O.M.Mt.RC.WL I., LíVi:,;i'oii;., Feil. Uíl.. quittes òr. ajíi::¡r.i v.-vy Ù ivwrr. ¡'..lur i.'J.il « !oivi t dull at i;.! lw.Tcr. Colt -n Sale.-i cu l'^riday of G.U'jO  Prorlt^ions iiiaci'ye at rrcTÍi  . (,■ to î!,u HUiJ inst.  —i¡ro.'k?r'o' fircnlir Whi'H ]<in'.J,i to cfi'(,".-t f-fili'.". Com baruly »u,-;l« .ned.— iMle.-^, dull.—  nr.cr  Lard  If corporationP havinp smaì! seonrity to phow, ; steady. Toüow dupn^Ebc-d. Richardson, Spencc  biit great expectfttions to fj/ier,-slitti! he ailowcd to givo high ratea of intorcit, u liy efaali 'loi iu-dividiial.s similarly .^¡tiiated bo alloweJ s.ir.iiar o|)porluiiitius of rai.-iiig fuiid.-:!  Js thoro aoy .so.nul seasoii for ibo distir.ction? I thiiik uot. Tho usiiry laws as thoy stnrid iu the tbtates rcBpeelivoiy are hart-li and unheiid-ing. Thoy maki ro allowaiice l'or eireiiin-taii-ces. Thoro is a ; Di ili rai.ge, it is truc, in Fonio iStatce, but genernd.- .'•¡ici.king, thcy aiiow no moro to bo oiforcd and taken l'or a {.'''C®'-than l'or a sinall oin;, no more f:r a pltiidor than  rioces-  k (.'". quoto wlicat 3d lower, l'hìlujeli'iiin, Utiki Ture, and C/h¡í> tloiir oTaaSd. Naval ttorus tlcttiîy. 'J'rr.de nt .Mmieboster fair.  ( ; 1 : M ; ti i i I .\"j • ! : [. L i( ; 1 \ c I-]  En« 1.ANO.—A ne'.v niini-'try is foruied with Lord Paimoritoi;, as Promior; Lord Faiifiiuro,  j'Í ht! i:ti:->ti ait.-! s ïîow ?îo;SiiiLt;:s al  On TiU'Siìay iii j.t ih-,' di nizcns of wh t is known a:'; a lIulNn lîuw, a culcelion oí dog-g<'i'i: .s, ^anibliiiliclis, bawdy hi.risos, situatoli i^n Siiuili CliU'k s'.ri i.-t, botwi'i n Twcli'ili and Ta}'or streets, tuniid fiutc« ?/i .f r for a !;-('!icral hunt aiicr t!ic ¡ü.ow Nctliin^s.— iii'spccrtalilc American (.-¡ii^i iss, ^\ìl()l¡v(' near the scene of tlie riut. til! us tliat there were at lessi one luiiulied Jii-linKn, wonian, and hali-orown eliilJrc u in iiie crow;'. The dis-  Intli:ina • csi3«i!uiave r^umnmi-}-.  bi.N IK, Wednesday Fe'). -21. — tvuti. i^r-pre--'Miled iy .N. ■■ -. i-r. Siiit, Coti.l 5 iii:i.i 11 thai .¡.-en. rf iSt, J ,-oi.)i. i. iiV [ a-x li ro c i i;<! 10 'l-e r. ytfites, jiiriiriietion over lend at Mie'i-i'lti City for a liglit House—(i itr ti''ir 'he tiii.e ■f hoi.court.. ;,'! Ilie ] 1 th jiK!:c;t!i Cireuit — in rLiiitieii to the s.-nieiit of liiiii aprs a;jaii;rt. raiireiiii ei n.fui.ii-f—letMiliziiig the tiekmAv ledg-iDeiU o| (li id.- ae.d n.<.rt;.;n£es pre\ ious lo "u. 'aking .r;re;o| it.c.. Reviiod St-itutes of loiTKlizirp li:e oi^'.-ii .zatiiMi Iii d aets -,f ermj-.a-Hie.- iiiien the fame Iirsr,.-—lielii.iiig the an.ounl  Fi oin 1 tie .American Orguu  SEvitry ilsoii ou Slavery.  WA8ni.xGT0.N, Feb. 17, 1855.  Dkar Piu: Referring you lo my cditnriala for 'he Ihtt two wet ks, I havo to ask you how far I tifico ei.rrcetly represented your views in mjr coii.dK (.is ii|.,,r. \ , i,r letter of the 20th Januiry, it .i lii.; (irti, lop ifi iho B^,sfon Beé, which I hivè' I'oj ieil? Jii i.th.-r word.s do yoi. or not recognize tr.L- iloctrii e of Kiuie rigbis, ei. far as to permit the .M.veral Siaie.s lo regniate '.he qnesiion of rluvery, in their own itft^de, within their Stato liiiiit.-.? Do you iir not enterfaiu the opinion tliat  Iricl which we ha\c named lias long been j t" be exeinpud la the unei.tery of Conirre>9 has power to itilerlere with slavery in  known as one of tlie wor^t h.ole-s in the i nlire ;ad administrator., fur tho uso of tho the Sla.e^? Do yon or not .-Pcogmze that "high-  city, and fur .'several niuiilh.s past, no Amerio )i lia.s ventiued to 00 ti] oniliat >ide of tlic street, past these hui]din;^s, fur fepr of bcin^;-  _rom  the iopaeity of tho lender, and thai long o.x-perience has proved the rates fi.ted to bo fair.aiid just.  I think, howcrcr, that upon inrotligation.such rates of restrictions will bo found to bo absurd, inoonsielent, and unequal in tlieir operalioD.  For insjanco, Vermont, Masfachuseits and Connecticut adjoin Now York. In the three former, it is fair and legal to tako six per eeiit., and no more; but ono foot west of their western !in»8, in New York, tho lender may tako seven. Again, in North CarolinR tho rato is six per cent., whilst one fool souib of the line, in youiii Carolina, seven per cent, in just and legal. In Louisian, tho rato i.s iiee per cent., and on spe-ciai contracts eiglit; wliiist ono fool norll; of the northern line in Arkans, the rato is si.x, and on special contracts ten; and ono foot west of her western line, in Texas, the usual rato is eight but on special eontraets may bo raised to twelve. Standing at the northwest nnglo of Louisiana, a man may have one fool un soil w here tho ma.\-imum rate of interest is eight per cent., another foot on soil whero ten is ullowod, and stick the eane ho holds in his hand in soil w here t\vel\e may fairly and honestly bo given. Here are people living around an ideal point, on sitniiar Soil, in a similar eiimiite, Mid piirsiaiig simil.'ir avocations, yet bein;^ under dilil-rent govera-inonts, the rales of inlere^l which they may gi'o and take are Aidely dilferent, svithout any kind of difforeiico in the natural or cixiuinrciul eir-ouinetaiices under «■hie.'i thry live.  Still more strangely, in Jersey City and Mo-boken se>on per eeiit., isiilKnved, whiiiit in oiher parts of the State of Now Jersey only six can be legally given or taken.  Again, in California interest is free, and the rate is dotannined oy agreement between the borrower and lender.  Now,there things prove ircontestihly that tho legalized rales of interest are not settled by any fixed principle of equity, j'isliee of exjiedieiicy; that they are arbitrary .lod un«oilled; th^.t t!i-.-y depend upon no rules of political eeo(ioiu\ , hut are regulated by ariitiei.al geograpliiea! lines, and wtiim-.Biid |irej'idiees of K'iiislators, rii'.lier ilian by demand fnd supjily, or the wauls and ri.'ijuis itions of tho people.  If money be wortli sevoti por eont., in New York Slate, why should it not he worth as much, one incti or one foot east of tho eastern hue?— If it be worth seven per cent, in Jersey City, why should not the inhahilunts of the subuibs, living ono fnin over the line,.bo allowed to ^'ive or lake as much, if they aru willing to do to?— Why fchould aol the u.oaey leader f.iid iiiaic-iiie-turer on one side of its streets be ulli^wed to agree upon the seme rato of interest at the sumo olasies of men may do on Ihe opposite side? [s not such a law arbitrary, anti-republican and unjust? But tho laws regulating interest aro still more unequal, and raise (<lill more odioii.s distinctions than these. Take Pennsylvania, t'lr instance of anoth  rs ¡irefí^r, of euiirsf, ; ■■-•••-i- • ----................  y] Hoard of Control, Sir Charlis Wood; Posi OÛice,  Cinroiidon, Seereiai  ney IKrbori, Homo ÜÍÍJce; Colonial (Uhee, Sir George Grey; Exchequor, \Vm. (biadatone; Aë-miroliiy, Nir JamOi* Graham: Lord Ciianeollcr, J.ord (Jrauw >rth; Presideul of iho Council, rlarl Granville; It vy Heal. i)oke of Argyle; Puhl sary rosclt? ''Uncr lei. i-.-r« ¡,.-cS.>r, ol euiirs.^. ^Villiam Moleb-vortl,; Pre^iilk-ut  tho be.st eucnritj' that olii/rp, and tbo man  limited means, but w ith energy Eiii prohilv,who i Lord Cam.ing. is willing to give a hi¿;her rale than the iuliex- j The above form tha Cabinet. Lord Joiin Rtis-iblo laws allow, in order to compeusalo the Ion- i Abordean, and Newcastle, go out. The der for his greater risk,.is precluded from doing ' bafanoo, except Lord Panmure, are tho isrce at so, because, though the "lender may be Tvilling, ' niinietry.  the law holds o\*er him tho threatening rod of Sir Charles Napier mada a savage spcecb n-forfeituro in our State, and forfeiture, ñne and ff®""'"''" o''"'"'-'"'-  imprisonment in New York, and if ho bo law- Nearly three millions sterling hid beeD voted  for war purpose«.  formcily l ot Mnule, ."-'eerotary of \A'ar; IJarl Lnoi Led down ana niunh red by the Iii.--li Î1 y of Foreign Aflitirs: Kyd- rowdies wlio infest them.  abiding, thus deters him.  Thu.s the poor man is prevented from having-his wants supplied at reasonable rates, whioh ho could have done if rates were free; but if lie needs and mu.«t have money to carry on his  The American Fisheries Bill had passed. English misEioiiiirios in Poland had been ordered to leave tho Russian Territory.  There was a diseiigoion in the House of Com-  30. If a vrii-uic citizen wishei to borrow : ''-"^"y  „u.ther, however great hi- neeessities may ; And no man whu reu.ly Uesires pure e.eei.ens be.he can legally olfer 10 fiigher rate nf iutor- ^ can, cotirisienlly, o| pose a sjstem whieh in good esl than six per cent.; but if a curporation, or , l'ailh aims Ihat rosult. No man is lujurL.i by "monsier," or "monopoly," {al least some of | it, no man lose» it dollur by ¡1, no man is cieprived them) wishes to borrow, it mav eirer wliat il ' "f J"t '^'ii«! i'}' ''  business, he must go into the market and pnv 1 on tho night of ihe 9th, regarding Sir  rato.s suliitieatly high to componeaie tho lender, j Charles Napisr's traueactions in^ tho Baine, bui  lirst fi;r the ri.^k of a pmail securily, and for ihe .......' "  rifik imposed bi/Ihe us^ury law whieh lliuä re-quires Inni to pay a premium for the protection /rum ìiiìirij iihì<h it ducs noi gicc him.  In my ne.xt 1 will speuk of the oppretfiong of tho usury laws. A iìoiiiiowuii.  Kegisii-y of l'olcrs.  Mr. Brooks of New York city, has introduocd Ulto tho Senato of lliat State, a bill eslablishing a regislry of volers, ai.d ilu elleetiveneps i:i pruveiiiiiig illegal votirig is so paiijobio that wo givo an ab.~traci of its provieioiis in tho tarnest bope that a biOiilar system will be adopted höre.  Tills eül proiidea, tays tho New York U'ri-bunc, Ibr a lii'gi.-ter lu eaeh eleeiivo distriet, to hu eonvenieijlly arrariged for reference, show-mg the lull iiBHieand reeidenee of the voter.— The Inspeclorö aro to meei a niouth beforo any eleelion to porteci the list, and all llieir pro-ceedings are to be given as Wide a publicily as piiseihlü. The Inspeclors' sessione in perfect-¡ng the lisi of volere are lu beso arranged as to uiiie and placo as to givo ampie oppurtuuiiy l'or all vo'.ers tcrbu regi^te^ed.  Appiieaiiii', u lä se ehiiuis may ho ehnl!erf£T('d or iioi bted, ere lo bo sworn, just as is nowdono at the poiir. Jf tiieru ¡.fu un} .'juseiil i.r ci^i,. who are entitled to vote, they ma}' bo regi.-tun d iiyon Ihe persunal voucher of liie L'jspeetors or ..(her .sati.->:nctc;ry proof. The registry is to he cumpleted, priuieti, and diitributed ui a reasoa-aMu lime helore the electiou, ai;d a lew days be-lure Ihe In.'ipeelurs are lo laeel für the last lime lo ^eltlu objectioiis, add unrugisiered naaies, and make the lisi a» compiute as poesible A eer-vitìed copy of iliis li?i is lo bo used inslead ol the presenl poli-hook, aiid al ilio sanie naie it gives the name fiilly and perfecily, whiuh is under Olir pre'^eiil system aimost impotigiUe, it Sellien in a moment und detinit^ly, wheiher an ap-piicunt bus a right to vote or not. 'J'he mode ol appointing l:ispeoti-.rs may be sottled by the Legis,aiuro."  Ulto in this State, whero illegal voiing has beeil so frcijuenl and iiolorious that nativo boni voterà iiave almnsl despaired of ever again see-the ballol box purilied, such a law has beer:  pleases. I'ou, Mr. Editor, dare not « fi'er more than six per cent, for tho use of money, wi'h-out violating iho law, but the Sehuyikiil Navigation Company (Pamph. Laws, lg4.'j, p. Siil.) may offer any rate it pleases. To lake more than six per cent, from j/om stigmatizes the lender as "usurer" and readers principal and interest liable to forfeiture; to tako fifty per cent., if thoy choose to give it, from the West Chester and Philadelphia Railroad Company (P. L. ISo-l, p. 119) is all tair, and honest and honorable.  Both these companies have availed ihemselvos  it allows ail lo vote wi:o can show a ri^-!.:, and it eHectiially excludes all who have no right. Is not this « result to be desired and to be worked fbr? Ai d who better to do that work than a Legislature elected by the votes of men whoeu loudeut bat-ile-cry was "puro elections.'"  In this city, acoording to all tho information wo could gather, there wore at least Ctvo hundred illegal votes oli'ered, dcteoted and rejected, and how many moro that were received, it is impossible to say-. The detection in this case was an uncommon achievement. It was so fell and boasted of. It might be done again with  of tho opportunities of borrowing at high rates.,---- ------- - " j ,  and the good and pious jieople who would not the same eftort, but how can wo be assured that "extort" more than six per cent, from a body 1 the same eiiort wiil always be made? And it it a soul, have no hesitation in considering it i eonld, is it no: far better that the same reMili very meritorious lo take all ihev can got from a ' should bo secured, oertianly, uiwardly. withonl  body iwtAoula soul. Perhaps the sou//fi.s nature j extra exertion, and by operation oj law, which of a oorporaiion has something to do with tho removo.s all those chances ot collision and qiiar-  rols which an e.xeiling election produces, than by  matter.  These incqualiiios and inoonsistoncie exist not only in the rates of interost a'lowed to ho mken, but in the penalties denoenced against ibuse who exceed the rslos.  In Pennsylvania, whero but six per ccnt. is allowed, if more betaken, the principal and interest are liable 10 forfeiture, whilst in Iowa, where ton per oent. is the rale, the forfeiture for an usurious taking is only the excees of interest received.  In Now Y'ork, whoro seven por oent. ii the legal rate, ihe pious and holy h^ror oi" usuerers i.-i BUcb, that if one bo caught Jinsiranta delicto, his whole principal and interest are forfeited ; and he may be, in addition, lined ii^lOOOarid im-' prisoned six mont.'is; but in O.'iio and 'i'exas, where tho legal rates may go as high as ten and twelve per cent., and where llia people '.ro supposed to bo less pious and less c.\emp!arily honest than the cliurch-going speculators oi" Wall St., New York, who aro kept rigidly virtuous by Trinity church maintaiiig u perpetual supervision over ihein, ihe ¡¡en&lty for usury is only a forfeiture of the excess of iii'erest taken.  Such laws mitrht I horefora bo thought to mean that men, as individuals, must he ¡.p-'tected by law from u.-arers, hnt that ffii collectively iu corporations may be !!Mi;oseii iipon witlioiit sin or mercy, or else thai they nnist riienn ilml moii, as individuals, cannot take care of their own af-fiiirs, bill that corporations are pre.-uui< d t.'< be (iblo to attend to their busiacs heller. Tho cimverse af the la.~t clause ef Iho proposition used to be considered the rtil.i.bul itinj ora inu-liinfur,etnos mii'miiur cum illis.  Tho previiiliiig irrogu'iiriiies in the rales of interes-t in din'orent S ates, and even in the name State, as in New Jersey, logelimr with tho dif-niid eorporfilion  ference made between men and iho difiorenl penalties impo.<ied for an infiae- ; mixed up wiih ci;t hty lion of the usury laws, show eoiichi^ively llial ; and h'IÏ 1"'r an hour ! - tw  mere individual eff.<ri? Wo cannot see it other-wico. llltìL'al Toliog uuder suoh a eyttom would be impossible.  It is true that a registry might be moro expen-8ÌT<—ihoug-h but little more—than tho preaont system, and that it could not relieve us from the dead weight of igiioratil voters imposed by our preBOiil Constitution, hut it would inovitably free lie from 'ho evil of heviug our elections controlled cr alFeeted by men w ho oome here as they came last fall, to vote and go back again to Peru or Terre Haute, or wherever their work on the railroads lay. Wo eboald have no more Ir-isbmun stopping over night here on their road from Ohio lo tho lìiinoi» Central road, because they hiid heard that the next day was elociion day, and they wanted a hand in it, as wasi the case last fall; and we should hear no moro ot pijielaying whieh the construction of railroad.s in every direction nuuio so easy and elFeetive.— (¡ivo us a Register Act, gentlemen of the Leg-isliiiurc, and orcrv voierof whatever party, who desires that our eleetitaiH should be fair vxpren-sions of Iho crri'/.K.v.H c-f tho .Stalo, wiil ¿five you his hearty appruval. — Ind. Jownal.  ?.!ii.k i-"ows.—If yei; de-ire your cnvs to yiehi liberaily !o ihe pini, y( u must fi ed tirio viith siuoell'.ii g belter .tíiiiled to the sooret'oa > f rich milk ibun dry prove.ider. Chopped routs, or meui slop of .-ome k inri, ..-houid be given ihi-m tv«,ico a d;iy, at leii-i, suy moraiat,'- and evening. They sliould al.-o be Mij^piiod vvitii lif.ere.l hedi', dry !od;:iiigs, modera'.ely warm, ard rp::ular:y watered lliriee eiieh day Lefero heiag I- d ; he curried or eianhed of ee n diiy, i'.r.d ^ait inixi/d oeciisii.'iinüy Wit": n I'ttle a.-he» or tine ln>iiedust, given two or Hucî limtw n week. 'I'liuy also l;ke !i variety of foe,]. Iv'-./Hs, eut or ra'-'fH'rl.ui.ii Irnw, ihen stirred r.i.e a lüeH.s vv l.ieli  no new light was thrown upon the subj'-ol  Parliemenl had adjeurned for a week on the request of Lord Palmejston. It wag to be re-assenibied on the l.Oih inst.  Earl Aberdeen had boon created a Knigiit of t!iO Garter.  Tlie Lord Mayor of liondon gavo a grand banquei, and amonght ihoio present were Lord ("ordigaii, Sir Charles Ncpif-r, fii.d oihir Boiables of the Crimea nod Baltic who wore received with unthubia.'in.  Sir ('liiirles Napier defer.ded himself and bitterly attacked the Govurnment.  The Baltic lefi Liverpool on the aiternoon of liie lOtii inst., and arrived out on the 5ih.  Tho city ot Monehestor arrived at the same time and was taken up by the Britinh Govern-muni to convey troops to tho Crimea.  Queen \'iQioria !iad issued a proclamation for bidding lier subjocts at home or abroad eupply-ing the enemy with mnnitione of war.  in reeonslructing Ilio Cabinet, Lord Derby, J]arl Clarendon, Jjord John Russell and filarquei Lnnsdowlie were successively sent for by the Queen, but all tailed to form a ininistry, when I'alinerston was sent for, and Bueeeeded.  Tiiii (JiiiiiiiA.—Tho news from tho Crimea is urimiiortant.  tieii. Canrobert reports iho deaths of Captains Pouter and Custleman during a soriia of tho Ru.-t-iuiis, on tho l-llh of January.  As provic;Uiily reported, ilentehiitoiT has gone noriiiv^ard.  The Russians wore constantly making sorties. Tiie siegu works were advancing.  Suiipites in abundance have reached Ihe Bril-isii Camp. 'I'hoarmy is siiil sickly. Fros'.y nights iiiid fine and mild days prevail.  'J'qo latest clTieidl despatches from Lord Rng-Inn dated the '.::>d and 2-ll.h of January, both allude to the invprovetneals in the a'niv. W. Atelier tpeHkb eheeiiiigl^ of the future ¡)rr'.3pcs'.s of the army, and snys that tl;"y w ill resume their work hefure the town wiih r( i;cwod activity.  Lord Lucan has been recailed Irom the oom-innnd (d' the cavalry in ihe Crimea.  Telegraphic desjialches frotn Admiral Bruat to the 3Uth of January gay« that the French Batteries had received orders to ra-open their lire.  It »-as said that preparations for tho assault were compleled.  I'he Russian army wa^ in want of supp'leB.  A sortie was made ou tho I23d, causing great loss to the French.  it is rumored that the Z'^aavos mutinied, and -i(iO of them wore seal to Constnn'iriople. They demanded the relreaiof the army from tlie Crimea. Tho rumor it was thought was incorrect.  An apology was made lo Omar Pasha, and he withdrew liis resignation.  Fka.vc E.—Magrie has been appointed Minis ter of Fiuuuoe, and Roget ilinisior of A^rioul-luro.  It is paid that tlio Emperor will take commuDd of tho army operations on tho Rhine.  Priuoe Napoleon had arrived at Paris.  ^KG-OT/ATIO.VS.  Tho Peace Conference at Vienna had not yot commoncod.  France has eignified lior wiilingneos to negotiate a separate treaty with Prussia, provided it covers the »amo obligations as that of December lid.  The (I'erman Diet has ¿ecidod to plaoe tiie princi|'e.l coiiiingenl on a war footing.  Holland and l)tnmark aro teeming disposed to Join tho Wefctern Alliance.  T1.kkkv and the na>ui!e.  Tho fooling- at Constantinople was etrongly io favor of peace.  The Sultan intends to raise a national voluntary loan.  Exchange at ConBt»ntinopIe has risen to 141 piastres, causing considorablo distress.  Abdel Kftder had asked lo lake command of tho African troops in the Crime«.  Eight Ausfrian merchant ships had been firod into by the Russians at Galutz. Austria demanded an ft-xplanation.  There is a reoort of a battle having occurred in ci'iisi ijueiico of an attempt of the Ru-sians to enter the Dobrocje, in whioh the Turks were vic'.oriipiis.  The Russian force- or, ihc frontiora of Austria havo received orders to retreat to tho interi-  the reasons given by the reftrietiunists are ua-j sound. ^ (  They show that in some Slates legio'nlors consider money wi^rlh less than in (iihers. and llial money is worch neire uiuier some eireuin- ^ i^lanees than iiador oüi.-rs. The very ¡act of i thes" sri'P.t im (¡ualili. s in legislative eo.ietinonls | in dilTorenl States is the slrongOrl arLn-nient a- : gains: rotrielivf! liiw.s. Thu now Stale«, or i Some of them, allow higher rates of intoreit than ] the older States. hoe.Tuse etipiinl i<> m'^f inde- 1 raand, and can be made moro [iroductivo and re- ; munerative there Ihsn in tho older 0110?, and the commercial parts of the ssaie Sisiu allovv tii(;h- | er ratea than the nf.'ricullural, as in Jersey City i and Iloboken, for similar rcB-oiis,and also be-: cause they aro better enabled thereby to ccnipote with Now York, which, because of its rates, : would otherwise draw them to their capital. '  ihey will ear gu lii.ui enough is iji  ■dily. We tl.ii.k hiivdly aUet:-eii lo che lieiidii'g of fi vvs, bs llie in"re qui. t mai eoniri .r ■ :i.b'u> I hey are, the less Icod will be required to S0rt;iin llie cv-'eT, iiiai m^y, liu reiore, to ¡ r^ di.i 0 fletti .-r raiik.  A gi.-iillel un vvh.) has e ii^'iiallv eaij N^yed s'Ai-ral jiairs t:|' vvori.ii g 1 xeu fer coverai v ears', -li-'.e^ that oxen vv ili tiavel iiflceii mi t-s a lii.y, being wiiii "l;!ter( d .iowii" ;it ni^ilit, as e«.-y a~ Ivvei'e ai.d lie ii¡:t ¡: the lard flour. If ihi.'ï bo (■"rrvat—ami it .'■eem'¡ to ijri iujj:-i«;e!it—it is n preüy ¡mj).''r!ant inntler that all our eattie are weil provided fur in this resi cet.  nkw Firm of chk.mt-tb an» dnunoti^t.— Ain(.iig the h'.i.-inesK changes ilii.s scaiun wc nuticu'liie di.s-(iiuli(ins of the oM and well known lirm of Ku^I.tuii, C'hirk et -Co. The ch anm'. in fact is or.iy in nanu-, as Î.Ir Wm. L. Rusiiton died more tiian nyear ago, nnd the ^bu.-incss has since been conducted by the surviving purtner.s and nicinberB of tli»- new lirm. Win. ilegon-.an, and Gcorji CI irk. NN'e rt inrmber Mr. Ileot iuain as a hiil in t!ie old ^torc, CI Williaai-.-treet, ! wei'.ty-tivo or twenty-six years agu, and as lie ha.s been in ilio ('slabli-liinenL (;ver -ince, be must Le equ;il in Lnuvvlcdge nnJ i-xpcrience to ar.y oni: in Liisini .-s. Aithi!t:.i:li I'.is f.anie lias m.  lia^ be( n !i member of twelve vears, and during • .-.s of Mr Ku-iuon ho had [■ tlu: r-stab!i>lHr.eiit.— .-tores In,-), .7:!, and r»! 1 i.ntli'.iu' tlieir conili ciion  The riot on Tuesday niobt rigod from the Excliange llolel to ihe 1 wtr portion of tlu-infected (li.stiict. 'J'hrough the street the crowd marched, infnriati d by liipior and a tiiir.-^t f(>r Iilood, ;ind dechiritig that they would be the dentb of every '-bloody Know  Nothink:" and "d-d Tanlee" that dared  to siiow his face.  A traveler who had just put up at the Exchange IJot( 1, and who bad stepjied out in front of the liou.se to .see the trouble, was knockcd down by tbe rowdies and verv badly bruised. Another man wns knocked' down upon the railroad track, and as soon as be reached the ground was covered with Irishmen, who pummeled him almost to jelly.— The ground where this took place, yesterday morning, presented the appearance of a butcher's } ard —the snov.- dyed with red blood. A third man, a boarder in tbe hou.se of Mr. liaynes, who also went out in the street to .see the row, was knocked down and brutally pounded on the bead with pieces of board, ¡uid kicked in the ehesit and body with thick and heavy boots.  He would liave been killed had not a fellow boarder who witnessed the butchery armed himself with an axe, and, fighting his way into the crowd, rescued the victim. As il was, his skuil was fractured in one place, and his head laid open in several others, while his chest and body was horribly bruised. One or two other men were seen to fall in the crowd and to be dragged oii". ^ What their fate is no one knows.  During the riot, the exclamation moat fre-qnently made use of Mere as follows:— "Death to the Ivnow Nothings." Down with the damned Y'ankees," "We'll be the death of the bloody Americans," "Cunningham v.-as not hung, and we're not afraid of the police," etc. There oan be no doubt that the recnt failure to convict the Irishman, Cunningham, of thennirder of policeman Lower, has the cifect of emboldening the niflian spirit of the disordeily Irish, and of making tlicm perfectly reckless as to the consequen-c s af their lawless acts. They do not forget that tlie murderers of Mory were not hung, and that Cunningham's life was saved, and they fancy that the)' can now gratify their hatred against the Americans with impunity.  The spring election, too, is drawing nigh, and they have been promised amph- revenge for their defeat last la!!. They arc fully per-bUadcd that their good tine is coming.  The riot was about over, the thirst for blood having been somewhat appeased, when a sleigh containing four police officers drove up, and one arrest v.-as matle, not however of one of Ihe ringleaders. This man whs sent to Bridewell yesterday morning. We have heard of no other arrests.— Chicago Trib-  1171?, Is/. _  Cronstadt.  It is soaroely poisiblo thatth > snacs whieh the Russian em['iro oeeiq ioa on the map of tho world .-koiiid not force itself on tho attention. It forms the ninth part of the habitable portion of the globe. Ils immenso extent embraoee every variety of olimate, from tbat of Spain and Portugal to the cold of the Arctic circle.  St. Petorshurgh is the principal soat of foreign commerce, as Moscow Is of the vast internai trade of Iho empire. Tho former is the great mariiimo outlet of the Ciulf of Fin'and, and has an exteneivo oommuiiicntion wilb ihe interior by rivers and canals. The waters of tho Neva, on which St. Petersburg stands, are too shallow to admit vessels of largo burthen ; their cargoes are iherefora discharged at Cronst.-idt, and barges »re employed in trnnsporting them to tho city.— Cronetadt is built on an island about soven miles long and one brond, and tho mouth of the harbor is strongly defended by a fortress bullion an opposite rock. Hero are extensive wet and dry docks, with etorehousop and all tho great oftab-lishmenls whieh are requisite in fitting out a fleet and keeping it in repair and fit for service, including fwvindries lor eiiiuion, ropo walks, See. Canals ara oonstructed. which enable ships-of-tho-line to take in stores c!o.=e to tho vvsrehouso».— The military canal, capable-of oontaiuiDg thirty-five sails, of the lino, besides smaller vessels, has beoomo so sballow as to bo incapable of admitting large ships.  Cronstadt was founded by Poter tho Great.— In 1703 a ship from Holland was the first merchantman thai had ever appeared in tho Neva, and the captain and crow were treated with groat hosjjitalily by Peter. In 1714 sixteen ships arrived : and from I'iOO to 15!'0 now clear inward nnr.ualiv, of whieh one-half aro u-nally English. Tho naviii'ition open al.ou' If'O days in the year—from tho middle of May to the end of November.  Cron-tadt contain? many good ."troots, whinli are well paved, but, with tho exception of the public huiiding'-'. the house.i are built of wocd. The ¡'rineipal hiii.'dings aro li;o admiralty, naval hoipitnl, school fer piiotu, liie exchange, custom hou e, and Imrrncks.  In summer all U lif.' and animation, for tho no tiviiy of tho year is cruw.iod into th« space of a few monl'n ; bui, as the winter appi-oaches, and the last ships of tho season take their departure, fearful of being lucked up by tho ice, tho scene changes, and all bf^oomea dull. The summer lin|,iiiation amourite to about -lO.OOJ, exclusive of soidiors, sailor?, and persons employed in the dockvards.  family. Senntu afij'>ureed.  gn:ze that "higher law"' doctrines, which permits you as a Sen-  in the «fternoon pétillions wer« pr^cnled hy disregard the hindin,; obligations of thö  i\Iessrs _L'awihornand I'arkmgton. Bill making ; Constitution?'^ the "Amencia.. Organiza-  J. W. Ciimmiiigs special Agent of Smio lo sei-lle her per centiigo p.ecouuis with the Gonenil (lovernment was reported. "Bright"t^ Frr o Bank Bill"' was then taken up, several nmei dmenls mndo and finally engrossed for a third and tinal reading—ayes 'iy," nays 18.  Here aro the proceedings:  On motion of Mr. B:own, the isfiios r^f n'l tho bank.'^^ combined ih.onid not exeecd t-J,CH'0,OCO— and that no single bank should issue more than  ifi^i'o.ooo.  11.0 nistricl System wn«; struck out.  Amended so that one-half of the slock .'hcuJd bo held by citizcns of the State.  lion'" in Aiussachii.-e ts, eml.iace the qiie^ition of slavery among those for the regulation of wtiicb that < rtanizatinn vvas formed?  Your answer at your earliest ooovonience, wili oblige your obedient servant.  VESPASIAN RLLIS, Editor .American Organ. lion. IIk.xrt Wii,som, U. S. Senate.  private property of the stockholders.  Amended so as to give the present banks, which iiave always redeemed their issues,2years and a haif to aocepl or rcject the proiifiuns of this aot.  Amended so that no bank can be established ina town ooniaining a less number of inhabitaDts than otic thousand.  Amended so as to allow banks estaU'shed under this act to issue small notes lo the amount of one twentieth of their circulation.  Amended so as to require ten persons to form an aesocialion for banking purposos.  Amended so as to prevent the free banks to establish AgencioB for llie purpose of afi'ucting the value of their popor.  The above oomprise tho material amendments to the bill.  The question was tiren taken on its engross-meut fur a third reading, and carried by the following vote:  Ayes.—Mpsers. Brown, Chapman, Crouso, Drew, Emsoy, Freelnnd, Glazebrook, Griggs, Harris, Hawthorn, Helm, Hoebrook, Jackson of Madison, Jackson of Tipton, Kightly, Meeker, Parker, Reynolds, Riehardton of St. Joseph,Robinson, Ruge, Safie, Suit, Tarkington, Weston, Williajns, Withorow, Woods—29. Noes.— Alexander, Barnott Bearss, Brookshire, Burke, Crane, (-'ravens, Cutshaw. Hendry, IIos-tetlor, Man.-field, Matthe«, Richardson oi"Spencer, Shields, Shook, Slaicr, Spann, Vandevanter — 10.  Tha Sonato adjourned.  Holsu.—Various rt-ports were made, in which hills were reported back for further action, of these, two w ere passed; to amend tho law relative to the formation of High School.«, k.o., to amend the ael relative lo weights and measures; 'he bill to provide fora Geological Survey of the State, Wbs lost on ils passage—ayes 35, noes 23; bill to raise a revenue for the years 1855 and 1856 w as reported. The tax it proposes to levy for State purposes is 20 cents on the $100 V« nrlh. and a poll tax of •'íü f>entg for ench yuar. Tho afternociii was occupied in disoussing the School bill in committea of tho VV"hole, during which, thp oommitie fixed the .school tax at ^0 cents un the is:]GO, and a poll tax of 50 cents.  From the \VaPlúngtcn Union.  The I¥cw Ciratic in liic Aruiy.  The IVIIowieg is a copy of the j^.ita resohition which passed Ihe House of iiepre.^entalives oi. .Monday, and which is at prcBOUl exciting aom« ttiteilion.  .K roso'.utlr.n authniiiini; tho rr;si(>nt r.rtlic ri.iied Ftate* to cotiier tlir lille 01 JLituteiiaiit Ucucral by Kr»vcl for tm-i.renl surxicts.  Kefolvtd by the Senate and Home of Repre-fentatives <f the Lnitcd ¡States of Atnnica in Congress assembled, That the grado ol Lieutenant trcneral be, and the same is hereby revived in the armv of the United Stales, in order thai w hen, in tho opinion of the Proaident and Senate, it may be deemed proper to acknowledge eminent serviece ot a Major General of the army in the late war cf Mexico, in Jho mode already [irnvjded for in subordinato gradea, tho grade of Lieutenant,General may be specially conferred by brevet, and by ürevet only, tu take rank from the date of such service or services : Provided, hoicever. Thai when tho said grade of Lieutenant General by brevet shall have once been filled and shall have become vacant, this joint resolution ehall thereafter expire and be of no cfl'ect.  Senate Ciiajibek, Feb. 19, 1856. De.ar Sir: My answer lo your inquiried wili bo brief and explicit,  1. I fully recognize tho doctrine of Statf , . , . ■ L, J . rights in its application to slavery as well aa trf  ^T^' ¡ «^'f'«-'- of P'-blic concern.  0 e, 15 for eferydo'^r issued, and 10 baia.on j The Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions oí at their market value six months be ore deposited. , iVfiS. in the main, as I think, correctly set forttf All real estate security was stricken out. that doctrino  Amended so thai after the suspension of any 1 The whole rubjoct of slavory, within Stattf bank .hould Its securities be unahle when eeio, I .bgoi^ie, f« StaleWegWa-'  to redeem all us issues, the hank commissioner« ,¡0,, ^ o-icgiot»  are empowered toclleci the balance out of the 2.' My response lo your second question W  included in my an.'tworio your first. I do not entertain the opinion that Congresi has any power to interfere with slavery as it exists un-( er S.aie laws.  3. Every man who believes in a God mua¿ necessarily believe thet there is a law paraoioanC to all human law, and that this law is to b'e (r>beycd by men in public and private life, rather than any human law in confict wiih it. But I seo nothing in the Conetiiuilon of the Unitetf States, as I understand the Cnnstitulion of thtii Uidicd Slates, whieh requires me, as a Senator from Moesachusptti, to do anything in coofliot with the law of God. If I thought otherwite; I would not take an oa'.b to support the Consli* luiion of the United Stales.  4. Tho Americon Organization in Masafcëbtf-setts does not embrace the question of slavery among ihoae for the regulation of whioh it wa« formed.  The people of MassacbaasUs have fixed opia^ ions, in which most of the members of that organization fully concur, against the support or allov^'snce of elavory by national legislatiOB.  They entertain the most profound ooavictiofT that the harmony and repose of the country, and ihe highest interests of master and slave, demapd that ttie national government should be relieved from all connexion with responsibility for slavery, and that this disturbing question should be lofT to the people of the States where it exists.  While they do not soak to impose these convictions and opinions upon their fellow-citizens^ of other States, or to proscribe them for not folljF concurrir;g io those conviotions and opinions,-they will submit to no dictation or proseriptiod from any body of men or section of the countryi I, as a Senator from Massachusetts, shall olaial for the opinions of her people all the freedom of utterance, and all the influence upon the actioti of Congress, and the administration of the gov-ernment, w hich a Senator from Virginia can olaint for the opinions of the people of the Ancient Dominion. Yours truly, Henbt VVilsoii* VKsrASîAK El LÍE, Esq.  From "Wasbin^on^  WAsmyarom, Feb. 19, 1855.-  The SecrotBrv of the Navy has appointed Comi mandors Engle and Gardiner to select propellers m he sent on tbe expedition in search of Dr. Kane.  The Amerioao Organ this afternoon publishei a letter from Senator Wilson, in answer to questions propounded by tho editor of that paper.<=ii: He pays thai he fully recognizas the doctrine of State Rights in its application to slafery ; that he does not entertain the opinion that Congresi has any powor t i interfere with slavery as iiei-its under State laws ; end that tbe Anierioaa organization io Masiachusetts does not ebibraotf the pubj» ct of slavorv emonfr those tor tbd ibgQ-!ation of which it was formed.  Froin the New York Trlbanfc  Arraignment of JLoring.  Bostoi», Feb. 20, 1856;  Tbe first bearing before (Tie joint committdfi of the Legislature, upon the petition of the peopl6 for the removal of Edward G. Loring from lh6 office of Judge of Probate, took place this afternoon in the hall of the House of Representatives. It was deoFely packed in every parti »"d thOud-ands, who desired to hear, could not gain admittance. Arguments wore made by Seih Webbf  Tho st>ction of the act of Congress which es- jr., Wendell Phillips, and Chas. W Ellis Mr ^ ' Phillips spoke about two hours. He said tb6  tablishca the irrnde of Lieutenant General was , t • ■ , ,  passed on the 28ih of May, 170S, and is a., fol- ! present Legislature had but two quest,ohs to Set-  bws. (Fifth Congroses, secotid session, chapter j f» '' Judge Lonng wUftout  ,.-uo > impeachmenlf Second, ought Judge Lormg td  • I J J be removed?  «' Skc. 5. .^nt/ be it further enacted, ^at j The first propooition may be settled bt ib« whonevor tho PreMdent shall deem it expedient consiilution, which provides for the removal t>{ he is hereby empowered to app«-nt. by and with ^„y ^^ ^^ . address lo Ihe Exeo-  tho advioe and consent ol the Senate, a com- without ossigning reason, or even permit-  mander of tho army which may be raised by vir- . ^e heard. To sustain this point  tuo of this aol, and who, being tM^mmissioned as ^ ^ Webster, Judge Story,-Judg»  Lifcutenant (leneral, may be aulhorized to com-I yjiij^j.^ ^jjjjjj^g^ o j 9  ! 1  hori) jjroinincn! iiic li'.'ii nicM- lì ¡he ;J>.-cr.ce ;;iK ;!•(• <_ ri'ii'..- •-)i;iri; '1 h  iiriiì rcinin lin i' V bul ('¡-I  rtsbu In a i«tute oi Slegro.  Okt.i:.\ns. Mondr.y, Feb. VJ, 1855.  The sti amniiip IJlack 'Warrior hns arrived Ht this port witlillaviin.tdiiteslo the 15th inst.  Creal e.xcitcnunt still prevailed, and new niilitarv roinj anies were iieiny formed.  'J'he whu'e L^^land h;id been declared in n si.Tte of siege, and nil the purls in a state of bloclwide.  A ¡)n'ci:imalU'n had been is.'ucd ordering bi t wct^n the  The Ckxthai. amkracE.\ri;r.TTT.-in-has I'oceived such n hard blow from Mr. M ircy, that Col. Kinney has written to Nurfjlk to-st<.ip tho enlistment of men. This buiine.-s  It seems.  cnA^inwai of vuliiiiii'i. rs, bi-tvvct'n the age.s of v.i'h 10 A^M-r ai.^! thai ll.cy ^-ive j bend,,g arms,  ra.cn iii;np.:.rtii( r4i!pMr.Kin^'. vvlo. hass.-j a niili'arv c,!n;mi,ssion had been created 'iniir.y yc::r.. hail cliar^v of iheir slon- ; fyj. ^..j^^Jrn part of the I<land. i;nv.,iwuy, and hr. l-.i.stcrbro.-k, furmly ot jj reported that Gen. Concha had sent IU As lioH-e, hut now in cli.-ir-e ol their ^^ py,.^,, j.j,,,, ¡-y^ ¿j.^^p^^  be.-niful sti.ro .Mi iii.;:i.!u-.iy. ;.sr. .Nirliolas The liritish sh^p-of-the-linc Boscnwen had ; Jus p:casin-i(.s< et.'iHhfulau..-ntion left Havana, and the war-steamer Medea wa.s  i;in;ra!!y reu aided. Mr. C laru has twkcn ; in cunvi ving troops,  r.n a.'iisv ¡•■■.rt in the man.ihicture of the ir ^ The Brilish Rear Admiral reviewed (he c. :« bratrd "Co,! Liver Oil," even gMin- i» ! troops wiih Geiural Concha ontlie 12ih inst.  A degree wns being enibrced prohibiting  Corporations fir internal improvements must ' of enlistni(,-nt dc.scrv.fS nolicM'. I have rtonev; their improvement aro c.\-perimonts, from a letter written by Col. Kinney to .some and as their security is less than improved and person at the ."-outli, lhat the v. lio'e force wa.s  produclivo real estate, they mast bo allowed to .y I,¡J, jjjlji;.,,..^. ^ ^ ,• • i . " , -  mane op in tho tempfaiion of high rates of in- , bein-r rc'rularly coaimis.-iJned and anthurized lre<picni:y matters ot iile and death of souls, cf «■bora .3, 781 are males and  .N'cwi'.iund'anc! hiiii-eirto sei' that it was enre-fuliy and properly nr..H;e. Vi'e wi.-h the new lirin tlio succe:.-s'v.hi>:h their tnlerjirise and pre: ev. ranee so well deserve, lur in their rc.spoiisibh; biisim ss, knovvleuiie  he sale of lire-arms and ammunition.  A C-'iN^r^ OF I'.i-vur.'^c.N-, Wisconsin, just nn-i experi- tiiken. shows that town to have a population  to promise theirmen granis of LsnJ.  .'^:erv ice  terost, «hat they lack in socurily ^^^ .„v,,,,,.-,« toeu n.cn gnuu.s  Legislatures have f/; ^ sidVration of twelve montlr  suoh laws to aclinowledge tho fact, tnat lite val- .  ue of money varies according to time, place and ita y capacity. Ihis betra nreumstanecf, and they thus repeal in some in-' acterof the enterprise.  ci-n-  to cuitvVAcrs.—-A. r. Commercial y.dverdscr 3.0o2 f. mnles. Of the ni'iles 1,723 nre  -------------------------; over 21 year.s of .içe. Ivlndisim r inks as the  fdT-'Fr.in' is said to be cau.sing nc liUlc stir tl.ird town in V/isconiin, iu point of size, ill Orf f O". Milwauliie sfanding ir-'t, and Racine second.  mend tho armies of tho United States, and shall 1 bo* entitled to the following pay ond emolumenti', | viz: §2.^0 monthly pay, i<50 monthly allowance j for foroiji", when tho same shall not bo provided | by the t'niied States, aud forty rations per day | or money in lieu thereof at tho current i)rice— j who sliail havo authority lo appoint, from time lo j lime, euch number of aids, not exceeding four, ( and secretaries, not rxcecding two, as lie may  The pmposition was answered by abundant tcMimony that Loring violated the State law of 18-19, which imposes a penalty of fine and lin-prisoninenl upon any Judge of Record, etc.; who shall hid in e.xecuting tho law of 1793. Tbat Loring prejudged in the Burns case, by reinark-ing to Air. Piiillips, before a full hearing was bad« that the case was so clear that be hoped no ob-  . ^ , , '" I I stncio would be placed in tbe way of thé fug}:  judge proper, each to have tho rark, pay aud , .¡„„-^ 'rt,„t ,1,« 1....  emolument.^ of a Lieut. Colonel."  and  tivo's return. That the ignorance of law whifik „,, ,, . ... I ,0.» he e.Khibited in that ease is proof positive of bii  '1 ho Me.\Ran war^tran.^pirod in the year I S-H, „„fit^pga the office of Judge of Probate ; tb&t d the nay of an ofncor with tho rank ot Lirut. ^^^^^ ^ ^,11! of sale of Burns before the Cass  was deoided, and finally, tbat be made kno^il hii4 deuisiun to tbo oounsei for tbe claimant b^fur* delivering it.  It was one of tho most logical arguments ovef made by Phillips, and created great excitements The remonsirantd did not appear.  Loring will undoubtedly bo removed by a largfl majority in tho House, and a small ono ia th« Senate. Petitions continue to pour in.  (jonerii!, as pro\iilod in the act of 1708. from that ; date to tho present v.-ould amount lo more than fifiy thou^and dollars. It will ho seen that there is atlaclicd to the grade of Lieutenant General a stai!" of six persons—four Lieut. Colonels and two Hecrotaries—each with the rat.k and poy of a Lieut. Colouei.  fortnehn DependiiSck on the Xonrn.— The following extract is from n spcech made by Mr Albert Pike, at tho Southern Conven-! The L.\bor Question.—The following ar» lion recently held in Charleston, S. C. Said the provisions of a bill introduced* in to tb« Mrl'ike: I Legislature of New York in reference to  "It is time that we should look about u;«, ' labor:  and .see in what relation we stand to the North! From the rattle with which the nnr.'^er tickles the ear of the child born in the Sinitb. to the.shroud that covers the cold form of the dead, everything comes to us from the Xnrth! We rise form betwetn the sheet m.ide in Northern loo.ms, and pillows of Xorlhern^feathers, to wa.'^h in I a-ii.s made at the Xortb, dry our be.irds on jS'orlhorn tow-als, and dre.s.s oiirM Ivi s in garments made in Northern loe.nis, we eat from Northern plates and di.^hes; our rooms are swept will; Northern brooms, ottr gardens dug with Northern spades, and our bread kneaded in trays or dishes of Northern wood or tin; and the ve y wood which feeds our fires is cut willi Northern axes, helvtd with hickory, brought from Connecticut and New YorkI"  (lt'TIic Mayor of New York lias deform-inod to return tlui Belgian paupers orconviei.s, now in the 'J'ombs, by aiil of the Belgian Counsul, to tb.eir naiive cotintry, at the ex-pon'-.e of their own government. The pro-posilion to send them West he rejects—le-mnrkin:,' that if ihey are not proper subjects be rt^main here, the West should not b'o burdene.:! wit!; thffja.  Sec. 1. Makes ten hours a legal day's laboi in all cases.  Sec. 2. No man shall employ a child^j^un-dcr ten years of age.  Sec. 3. No man shall employ a child under fifteen years of age to labor over five hours a day.  Sec. 4. Persons employing children stall see that they attend schooll hive days each week.  Sec. 5. Guardians shall bind out cliil-dren under the above provisions.  Sec. 6. Agriculturists shall give chH-dren in their employ, at least four montliis .-chooling each year.  Sec. 1. The pcualiiy i.- for each day'» violiiiion. The act to take eflecton tl;e 4th to July, 1855.  (fcirJames Russell Lowell, the poet, Las be t n elected Professor of .Modern Language« and Beiles Letters, in the Harvard Unirer-fity, to succeed Prnf. Ltmgfellow. There were five candidates, but Mr. Lowell was not one of them, nnd was elected without bis kuowli'dgc. This vras n high compliment. lif wiil spend a year iq Gerr-iaaj and before he cuferstijion tfte dutsp« oflrisrpi^«   

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