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Fort Wayne Times Newspaper Archive: November 1, 1849 - Page 1

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   Fort Wayne Times (Newspaper) - November 1, 1849, Fort Wayne, Indiana                                 >  MES  jsrm^mmssA y  «Y  VVjqpo, ^ Co.  JiS ftfr|3ceTij®,S0paid within siztnonlhB, r,Cip if paii afte." Ihc year expiree.^ No paper be^^diaeonxiiiiied, unless at the ontion o1 r the ■lien,iijitii all arrearages are paid. ^j^^i^ES' OF ADVERTISING. iBlèrtiSemènls willbeinsertedin the"Time8"at UierolIOtWing raleet Ì squareol (250 ems) 3 weeks  ^illbecbair|ed¥or each additional inserilon. A. •reu«n|^e|dueoaiit will be made to ilio^ «drert 'ibg By^lfie'ye»»'.__  Riissia and Turkey.  cause of liberty in Hungary was •iìuì^!e98ed.by the overwhelming power of Rus-of the patriot Hungarian leaders, a-  WAYNE TIMES  n  lilBERTY AN» UNIOxVJj  Volume X.]  Fort Wayne, Indiana, November 1, 1849.  Bm, and Bimbenski, took refuge in the contig-Turkey. The northern bear, •Mohoias, thirstáng for the blood of the refugees, •démanded thetn of the Sultan. With tJiis de-Mind, to Ms 'eternal honor be it recorded, the ilfctiet promptly^eelined trf comply. The civil-tzed world is now outraged by the avowal of the ^nperor, that .ha wiU regard tliis refusal as a cause of war a^nst Turkey; and it is not im-piolM&le that, ere this, his myrmidons are marching towiadslth.e'Bc^honis. There is no doubt butiie has long been eager for a plausible pre-;text-f(^jsuo¿ a "move. He covets more "annex-■fttion," and the rich provinces of the Sultan's ^plre priBÓeñt a tempting lure. But will Eng-Eraijoe-^n they—stand passively by, j  Speedy Justice. On the night of Thursday, Oct. 18th, the assault of "Poison Jim," (we know not his real name, and this is the one he was universally designated by here,) was made upon C. Murphy, which resulted in the death of the latter the next morning. Jim was arrested. The Circuit court wás in session, but the Grand Jury had been dis-'charged. It was immediately summoned again, and convened on Salairday.- A true bill was found on the same day. On Tuesday the trial commenced; and on Friday night, just eight dayslrom the commission of the offence, Jim was sentenced to the penitiJntiary for 21 years,  We hear but one opinion expressed, and that is of unminglcd satisfaction at the whole operation. They were emphatically a couple of bad oharaeters, and the whole community feels easier and safer in being nd of them. This may harsh towards the deceased, but death does not sanctify tliose whose lives were evil. What  tfiià mthïe88 invasion for such a cau^ ^^ ¿Q^^n to be true, and "the  ^àL'they ^'»»«Ûy j)émit the already overgro i(m«ri>f4lassia to be further augmented by thé nà^tti^ pf ft Iwff® portfen of the Turkish territory? We confess when we saw England vstand quietly by, permit Franco to overrun Rome, eztinpdsh the torch of freedom sa recently •«^dled in th#'"etemal city"—-when we saw -¿e^ boiJi look with indifference upon the recent '«vents in ill-fated Hungary—we gave up all hope ' of anj^ j^ood from either; but upon the occurrence ■<6t this^new outrage—^when Ac Turkish domin-'ions are aBout to be dissevered for an act of juB-tièe, and mer^ on the part ef the Sidtan—we do •idèntly hope that France and England will yet interposé and drive this Polar Bear back to the Neva. We hope this with the more confidence, Iiecause it is esisentiid to tiieir own safety to present the further growth of the Colossus oï the North.  It-is gratifying to see one point -at which tjje '^hiUous projects of Nicholas are tiiwarted.— For a number of years he has been prosecuting a war of invasion against the Circassians, at the ^^^of.the Btok Sea. We obtain a glimpse of Âe«j>eiatiaRB in that distant region but seldom, liiit i^n sre do, it is almost uniformly adverse to Uied«ep«t. The hardy mountaineers have, for the last ten «r twelve years, defied all the force he could send against them, and the latest intelligenee that has ^chcd us represents them »à still victorious. Sehamyl, their leader, ap-to be just the maa for the emergency, and tkese peopla have never been subdued. When necessary, they retreit into their mountain fast-laesses,, where the foot of ihe clumsy Russian cannot reach; and then, when Jeast expected,, Aey as suddenly-swoop down into the plains, |  truth must be spbffen of the dead, as weU m of  the living. They were regaided as dang&rous men, and people feared them. >io one doubts but Murphy set fire to Mr. Cothrell's Livery Stable a short time ago, by which it was consumed, although the fact could not, perhaps, be proved; and Jim has long been regarded, to a moral certainty, as concerned in the incendiary attempts that have, time after time, been made in this city. He was emphatically a vagrant, a vagabond, a desperado—the lowest of the low, and vilest of the vile-r-toUowing no occupation, consorting with abandoned women, sleeping in old barns, stables, hovels, under the trees, or any where that chance indicated. The community is happily rid of them both, and heartily glad of it.  Power of the Bible.  A correspondent of the Broekville American travelling in the soutliem part of Indiana, gives a graphic and interesting sketch of the town of New Harmony. The town site is described as one of great beauty, and it has been well improved. The houses are not remarkable as to architecture, but arc surrounded by tasty gardens. The writer relates the following incident illustrating the power of the Sacred Scripture": .  All of those who re^ipinod èU;New Harmony and in the vicinity, on the failure or the Owen scheme, were iniidelrf. The bible was not read, the iSabbath was disregarded, except as a day of music and dancing, lishing and hunting, and so It coutiiiued for years. They iiad undisputed sway, uniil a few years ago an unpreteudiiig youth, who had spent most of his time in a sadd-itti's shop in lirooiiviile, with a oibie m his saadle ^ bags, entered the town as a Methodist preachcr, j ' ' ' ' ' " and louna the aoor of a widow open tòt the gos- j ' " i'i pel. lie preacjjcd anJ hti another appoiiiLuieiil. :  Things in San Francisco.  BayarS Taylor, the California cones-pondeni of the New York Tribune, in a l'aie letter, says;  "The Parker^lcuse, a building 40 fee» front by about eOdeep, rents fur $110,000yearly. At least $60,000 of this is paid by gamblers, who hold nearly all the second story. Ajoin-ing it, on the right, is a canvass tent, 16 by 25 feet, called "Kl Dorado" and occupied by gamhlurs, which brings $40.000. On the opposite orner, a building called the "Miner's Bank" used by VVrighi^- Co., brokers, bring $76,000. It is about hall"the size of ouj fire-engine houses at home. On ihe left of the Parker a smalUtwo-story frame bu'lding, which is just finished, has been token at $80, 000. The second story coniainseight gaming tables, each of which pays 8300 a night.  A friend of mine, who wished to find aplace for a law ofTice, was shown a cellar in the earth, abont 12 feet square and 6 deep, which he could have at $250 a month. The owner came here about three months ago. without enough money to pay his passage; he is now worth $20,000. One of the commof»-soldiers at the, battle San Pasquale is now among the millionaires of thé place, with an income of $60,000 monthly. A noted firm has $110,000 loaned out a,t ten per cent a month! A citizen of San Francisco died insolvent last Fall, to the amount of $41,000. Mis administrators were delayed in settling hiMaifairs, and his real estate advanced so rapidly in value meantime, tliat after His debts were paid, his heirs have a yearly income of $40,000. These, fuels are indubitably attested.  "The carman of Melius," Howard «St Co., has a salary of $6000 a year, and many others make from $15 lo $20 daily. Servants get from $100 ot $'i00 smoijth; but the wages paid for the rougher kinds of labor has fallen to about $8.  "In April, there were only about 30 or 40 person^in San Francisco,.and not more than 20 perrons could be seen in the streets at any one lima —now there are some 500 houses or tents, and a floating population of 6000. It is calculated that the town is increased daily by froin 15 to 30 houses.  Caleb I yon, the poet, states that his two best days' digging amounted to $1012.  Tlllb; A10TIlJBRli£:S8.  God4|bIp and shield lite motherless,  The stricken, bleeding dov«— For whom there gushes no rich fount  Ol'deepaifd deathless lovel The saddest tiib grief confers—  For wlio 80 loneaa they, Up<%who8e path a mother's love iSheds not ¡is holy ray!  No gentle form above them bends  To snothe the couch of pain— No voice so fond as her's essays  To calm the feverish brain. Ob, other tongues may whisper lore,  In accents soft and mild; But none on earth so pure aa tbot A mother bears her child 1  Judge kindly of the motherless—  A weary lot is theirs. And oft the heart the gayest seems,  A lold oi sorrow bears. No /bilhful voice directs their steps,  Or bids them onward press, '•And if they gang a kennin' wraiig," God help the motherless!.  And when the sinful and the frail,  The tempted and the tried, Urspotted one! shall cross thy path,.  Ob, spurn them nat «side.' - -Thdn V nowst not what thou hadst been  . With trials even less— And when thy lips would vent reproach, Tliink,iAey'were mot/ierlessi  A blessing on the motherless,  Wher'ei they dwell on earth. Within the home of childhood. Or at the stranger's hearth! Blue be the skv above their heads.  And bright be the sun within, O God, protect the mntlierless, And keep them free from sin!  Specie.—At a recent date, there was hoarded up in tlie bank vaults and subrtreasury of Now York city, $11,600,000. So large an accumulation of specie lying idle at one point, cannot but be detrimental to the business interests of the country.  Philadelphia is music-mad.—Ex. paper. Philadelphia is mob-mad, as^ the disgraceful niobs there almost daily conclusively show. At the latest dates, however, there had been no mob or riot for the previous twenty-four hours. The morals -of the city were thought to be improving.  Gold in Indiana,—^The story about»gold being found in Morgan county proves to be true. Several hands are successfully engaged in digging it. The particlcs are found in the soil, from' which it is separated by washing. The largest  [1^0.8.'  i^n .ii ihe oilier riu , an'l (uriamiv !i  iiiiud iiif,; lor in.-%:<jad of the Miii:,  carrying death and destruction alike to boor and ^ P ^ ^na i«ú ailPtiier,andaltnough i - -.^k.. of il.e e... Iiosiasn..- -Lay.< ..f  Cossack. They are a powerful, hardy, chival-! ^^^ niado no pretensions to great iearaiug, ne and :ti< llis¡or> ol hiiglai.d. u inrh  rous racc, free as the eagle of tlioir native moun- could tell the simple story of saivatioii uy iaili)  taitis, and they will never bend a neck to the in Christ, and lie found cviii uiere wiuuig Hearts,  yoke of a tyrant conqueror, while one of them «e soon formed a little society. Tiie society m-  « , creased, and u is now ui lUe ceunreot a goodeir-  rem^aujs to bathe his sword in Russian blood.— ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^ cliurch.  Whole hecatombs of Russians have been sacri- one of tne largest in i'odey county, and a very  ficed to the furious valour of<he brave and in- comibrtaDle parsonage, wim a garden and stable  T. Bablngfon Macaulay.  The correspoiidt-nt of the Boston Times give.s the following description of thu person-ill apjicaraiico of the great historian T. Ii. I piece which has yet boon found weighs a ponny-vliica ila: I weight.aijd athird. The particles are generally  •«In Eiigiisl. Iit.;ra:.ne thore is but one tnvur gn^^j,^ ^^^ thirtieth  wihal IS upon ..-very l.p, as lus wr.tmg< g^ain. They are scattered over a wide ex-  tent of couutry. Where they most abound, two quarts of earth yield from twentr to fifty parti-cleg.  Annexation of Canada.—The subject of annexing Canada to the United States continues to excite much attention in Montreal, An annexation address obtained over twelve hundred signature!?, among the most influential classes, while a remonstrance obtained but two hundred.  ai-f 111 lian.l—thai is the naou; ufTlio-  iií-i ■ B ihliljíi'iu MitcauliiV. Isaw ^írPJír^■iU hi^-  ks  trepid Circassians—^vast armies of s^fs and Cos-^cke hav^ laid their bones to bleach upon the sides and along the steppes of these mountains —until the Russian soldier dreads a Circassian  attached.  Blackwood's Magazine, i n review of Werne's "Narrative of a voyage up' the Nile" furnishes the following description of some ol the strange campaign as he does the knout, or the snows of scenes passed through:  Siberia;'for he linows it is certain death. How j i'VVe can concewe few things more exciting long the blood-thirsty tyrant, Nicholas, will eon- thah-uch a voyage as Mr. Werne iias aecom-tinue the infatuated crusade against this gallant plisncd and refcorded. Starting from the out-. , ^ . , posts of civilization, he sailed into the very heart  j^ple, or with what future success, remains to Africa, up a stream whose upper waters then, Jke 'seen. ^ : for the tirst time, were furrowed by vessels larger  —~ , p.. ■ I than a savage's canoe—a stream of such gigantic  . Mr. Bankroft-Diplomacy. ! proportions, that its width at a thousand iniies  "British Whigs," is a favorite slang phrase ^^^ g^^g jj aspect of a lake rather  with the Democratic press and politicians, and than a river. The'Arute creation were in pro-they suffer no oportunity to pass unimproved, of portion to the watef»leourse. The hippopotamus  . ^ «Ti.- ' .V__^t;««» t« reared his huge snout above the surface, wallow-  representing tne Whig party as subservient to ^^ ^^^^ either hand rundown the  British interests- This is the old cry of «stop gtreanT; elephants played in herds upon ^e pas-thie^" to turn attention from themselves. It is turcs; the talJ giraffe stalked among tfie lofty well known that their policy in rega|J to the palms; snakes, thicii as trees, lay coiled in the  .Tariff tends direetiy ■ to foster and encourage slimy swamps; and ant-hills, * ^ ' ® ered above the rushes. Along the inicKly peo  pled banks, hordes of savages showed fhem-  Bt^Ii inanufiictutres, at the expense ef our own.  IÄ ¡iH i poftr), 1 Inumi a hnle.'hluli'm»li\Mnai y! iMO!'' Mian iiiiiiiiliii^ sirtiuii-, ami wiili a toil soiid, ..va! Ine»-, »-row s;it;ìil'. m-; . i-aii..^', a,e! iMUiei large nee.li aiul .sliouliji-rv, ih uyii ^»i i. a v«ry lively and hright cxjiie.ssi.m olC uii-lènance. Mr. iVlacaulay is aiiiomied when coMVfcrsiiig, and accoinpanie-s wiili some gesture every thing which he says, witli emphi»-si.s. i 1 is .splBoded cou'.ributions lo the EdinOu i g  Something JVne.—We learn, soys the State  Guard, that a gentleman on the lower part of the  Alabama River, is now constructing, and will  soon have in operation, a floating saw-mill, to be  ReView,'whiIe he w'asa coniempurary writer propelled by steam, so as to travel to any point  for that periodical with Mackintosh, Sydney , upon the river and deliver lumber. Quite conve-  Smith ami JeHVies, won my enthusiastic ad- nient. ___  miriition, and hts magnificent hi^story of Eng- cholera.-Ate\7cases of Cholera have land, or rather essay on bnglish history,&c..  far as it has gone, aUcacts me irresi-stably lo lately occurrcd m Phihidelph,a among some new-its pages. No writer of the present day is so . ly arrived immigrants; and an apprehension was rich in thought as Macauley, and no one can entertained that the disease wasabout to become clothe his thoughts in »i>bler language,—But | again prevalent in the city, regret mingles wiih my admiration.— Twice  he represented, Edinburgh in Parliament, a city worthy ol'a true man—But in 1846 he lost his election, not beeau.se hu was overreach ed by the electioneertiig arts of some petty I'ory poliiiciaii—not because the eccentricities of genius made him one ol those unpopular great men who are so often found in re-liiemt-nt, because he refused to join in that grand movement which is everywhere making for the upraising of the masses; and "Ltb-  ihe^iciofaomeoftheirTariff notionsbeing to gelves, gazing in wonder at the strange ships, and erty, Equality and Fraternity," be the real  award a premium to the foreign manufactures, for making ambiguous gestures variously construed ' ...... ~~ .i,» ........r  the depression of the American. Their policy i ^y t'»« touehing commercial matters appears to be tak  ing the same direction. The intelligent Washington correspondent of the Baltimore American^ i» a. letter upon the British Navigation Act, has the following:  \ Mr. Batik, oft, our late Minister to England, was very desirous, upon the principle of the largest libeity and perfect reciprocity in commerce, to^vo up our Coasting Trade for that of Great IMtain—that is to say, that for and in considera-dofa that Great Britain would allow our ships to trade around her little Island in a circle of a few hundred miles, the same liberal and magnanimous apirit itowards bur mother country which dictated ^e Tariff of 1846, would allow British sliips to anS compete with us in a coasting trade from the Bay of San Diego to the mouth of the Cpfiunbia river, an extend of coast not less than tbiiu^d to eight thousand miles.  rJTtifl Mr "niiri?—^ '----fifihctlhiSi^  &|s&Ton^|piitoe of diplomacy, the 'Union' would doi^Uess i^vc lauded him to the skies for it in set it down as one of Mr. Secretary Clayton's egregious blunders in the next.  Those engaged in the Coasting Trade have cause to rejoice that Mr. Bankroft wa« interrupted in hisfree tirade negotiations, otherwise our coast would in a short time have been whitened with JPtitiab sails.  JVw j&w Jn /rwu—There has just gone into operation at Booneton, N. J. a Triple'Chamber, ^e jnveiition of JM[r. S. S. Salters of Newark, in Ibe upper chamber of which good Iron Ore (any w^hich does'not turn out a great deal of slag) anthracite coal, pulverized and mixed, are ^ieed, andj-fire being applied, the coal isycon-atmied and the ore melted; whereupon it is' al-jk>wd to descend into the next chamber, and then inla the next, but not "exposed to the air at any tjBfe« finally drawn off at the bottom; fully ^i^fSnned into Malleable 'wrought'Iron or Blooms, ready to be rolled or hammered- as may "be desired. It is asserted by the patentees that ' good Wrought Iron, such as woUfd now command in this market, can be manufactured by this process at i|30 per ton. Some very fine samples . ofthia Iron are now on exiribition- ftt the Fair.-,-VV. y. TriinKM.  Missouri Toba^xo.■—The cultivation of Tobac-fio is becoming a business of considerable importance in Missouri. The St. Louis Republican fays: ,  We are pleased to learn from the Brunswicker, ^t the Tobacco crop of Chariton county is all put and housed, without any frost or other detriment. 'From all the neighborhoods around us,' ^ys the paper, 'we have the most cheering accounts, both of its quality and quantity. It is one of the best crops ever raised in th« Grojj^d River country; and "if we may judge from ihe present prices in the St. Louis market; our plan-lers may calculate on a fair remuneration for their labors this soason,'  tility. Alternately sailing and towing, aS the wind served or not; constantly in sight of natives, but rarely communicating with them: often cut off for days from land by interminable fields of tangled weeds, the expedition pursued its course through innumerable perils, guarded from most of them by the liquid rampart on which it floated. Lions looked hungry, and savages shook their s^irs, but neither showed a disposition to swim aM board the flotilia."  The' iLLtJSTRioTs Trio Fallen* Ohio hasj%st -h^ to mourn over thè fall of three most illuSlrious statesmen! Three, who (if the gallows be not abolished) may hope yet to attain the most elevated situation! They were, among the most conspicuous men, whom the Democracy had made the chosen vessels of its glory;—but, whom an ungrateful people have left at home, for their coun Ify^gJod. The.'ie ilTusti ious three are Norton S. Tuwnshend, Luther Montforty and one Letnuel Foji/s.  Townshend was left at home because he was suspected of not being too honest. Mont-fort because he was suspected oi bemg a blackguard; and Lemuel Fouts, because he was suspected of not telling the t ruth Off! w'hat a fall was there!  Sad, silent, and dark, are the teaaa what we shed As the night dew that liills on the grass o'er his bead (Jom.. Chronicle and Alias  A MOMfcWT.  'Tis the breath of a moment—which no one regardelh:  That holdetb the key to each secret of life: 'Tis a moment that oft oar long watching reward-eth.  And claims the dark waters of sorrow and strife. Its breath may seem nothing—but yet 'tis extending  A power the sublimest our being can know; A moment may yield as a bhss without ending— A moment consigns us to darknsss and woe!  Its circle may flash with a beauty that agrs May crown as immortal, and hallow its birth; A moment may question Uie w.isdom of sages And ohiingb the whole system of science and earth.  coiifiilion, as they are now the watchwords of nations, it was for proving recretini to these sentiments ihat the voters of Edinburgh dismissed the ablest and most^Siilliant writer of the day, and chose instead the humble paper maker and sturdy republican"C.'^arles Cowan., They were not content lo have Mr. liitcaulay talk speciously of liberty, and then asspeti >U«-ly give up those principles of which he might have been and was expected to be, the ablest champion. But in his poems, in his essays, »und in his magnificent travels over the world, of general history, in his bold conceptionsand wondrous art, in his power to clothe in animated, vivid, passionate thought the most common truths in philosophy, in his vigorous eloquence and luminous strength, he is su rpassed by few in ancient and by none in modern literature. _ _  Cure for Dyseniery.—We are informed that a mcdical gentlemen, of high standing in his proiession invariably pre.scribes ice, and icc only, for his patients, in dysentery, and in most cases with success.The ice ts to pounded small enough to swallow it, and the patient is to swallow a small quantity of it every three or fyur minutes, untjl the disease ceases. Three or four instances have come within our own knowledge in which viblentcasesofdysentery have been cured within the course of a single day by this remedy.—N. Y. Jour. Com.  Do NOT Rely on Appearances —We were .informed yesterday, by a person who state-it as a fact, that on the landing of the steam ship Falcon,an individual came on shore with but hat, coat or boots. After looking around him for some time with a free and easy, independent kind of an air, he called to a drayman and requested hiin tiT'take charge of a pair of saddlebags, which were on board the vessel, and convey them to Hewlett'."?. Villi sogne hesitation the drayman conri)lied with hi.-i request, but on atienipling to lift the sad-dle1)»gs ho was imal'lo to to so without assistance. The flirt wa-i, thai they contained $40, 000 in gold, which'the cqatless, hatloss and bootless the man h-id brought with hun f-ro.n j cim say that through  height  1 aspire  Snhw Siobm.—On SMnii-y lat t thi.s section of country wa.s visiter! Iv ■ ; i-. orf snow storm, very extraorduv r .or lie se: son.— Tie tops ofthe highe."5t hillr wore coveied, I oth east nnd weft ofthi*^. Iti if, t.owpver. the f iiow .melted ns it fell. At NonhfieM we saw en"W on Monday eveh'ng; ¡ui ' from some of the high lands vie h>ve he; fd hnt the ground was covered on by from 3 to 6 inches of snow.-^MonfpeJier ( Vt.) journal.  . and dwptive.—N.. O- Pic.  The Turkish government ha.s esiabli.shed a .system for gratuit<ius medical.aid ihiough-.out the empire.—Phy.sioiup-^ jire ai);.i>iiiud. with salaries, to visit and attend the sick, and ' a re. prohibited from taking any lees from the poor. They are to re^rt their pases everf three months, officially, they are subjected to penalties if th6y.neglect the poor in favor of other Glasses,,  JVovel Engine..—The London Times describes, an improved steam engine, which, if the description be corrct, must supercede all others. It is said to require much less fuel than the ordinary engine, and is so easy to set in motion, graduated to any velocity, or stopped, that a boy 12 years of age can manage it with onc(®hnd. One of 10 horse power only occupies a space 21 by 7 inches; and one of 100, a space of 4 feet by 2.  Panama Railroad.—^The contract for grading the line of this road has been awarded to the Messrs. Follin, of Philadelphia, for about $400,-000, being below.thc estimate of the Efngineers.  The Hon. Thomas Butler King, of Georgia, wliose life was dispaired of in California, the latest accounts say, is rccoveiing, and out of dan-  ! ger. _____  A Boston paper tolls a story of a dog, belonging to a manufacturing establishment, at North Attleboroe,.that has become an inveterate tobacco-chewer. We can only say of him that  he is a dirty dog. ____  War in Europe.  There is a possibility, nay, a probability of a war in Europe that will involve England, and which, once begun, must unite all liberal governments against that great despotism, Russia. The Czar demands the extradiiion of the Hungarian refugees, who are nou- on Turkish soil. H.^ dematnU wiih a lone, which s^k-s obedience, or war as the aiier-native. rurke^ refuses to yeld Kos-suihau.l his compeers to an Austrian halter. Eiig^a-i! and France, but particularly tho fo tn-ir, a e said to be the backers of Turkey, and w -^l) such backers she may be safel v j-e.-^oluie m her dfcfiauce of Russia. If there is to be wa. it Will «pe very soon, llussia is nearer thi-first fieldof action, than England, Her fleiM.-; and armies can reach Constantinople in forty eight hours, and they are in readiness. Turkey has 80,000 men in the field, svho will fight hard for nationality, but harder for the Mos lem fiith. S^w ha.s also a powerful fleet uio, in the Bosi^orus.  An English fleet could not reach Con.s au tinople under twenty days, ami for Uia; l^n^ of time Turkey, witji Polish and Huog-uia i a.ssistaiice, will Ije able to defend hersiK.— In the matter ol naval force, England i.seqiiai to «11 the powers ofEurope,leaving out Fnimtr and Franco will either siann nnutral and witness the success of Turkey and Eng laud, or she will give them her aid. Who such a door hond«>l And if th« war upfm the iia ioii< pposfcij !<• itossia.anu ner oloody ally, Austria, ue a just |)iinishment for their ahandon-menl^if Hungary to destruction. The sky  A few mornings ago, as we were going to our office, about sun-rise, we met a decidedly hard looking customer, leaning out of town, who had evidently been "making a night of it," tut who was then making "worm fence." He carried a large jug in one hand, and a smâll one in the other; but the balance being unequal, he found it impracticable to maintain a perpendicülár-^the attraction of gravitation was strongly inclined towards the larger vessel. We knew him not; but could not resist the impulse to turn and watth," for a moment, hiS unsteady, tottering steps.— What a flgod of reflection passed through the mind in that brief moment. Visions of innocent and s^rtive boyhood, followed, perchance, by bright and promising j^outhfulness—»the syren song o6the tempter, which said "ye shall not surely die"—the struggles of resistance, firm and determined at first, but gradually growing weaker and weaker, until the slimy serpent of dissipation had enveloped him in its "loathsome ooil—the drunkard—a miserable, forlorn", strickcn neglected, sorrowing, heart-broken wife, domieiled in some wretched hut, or hole, totally unfit for a human habitation, with, perhaps, half-a-dozen squalid, ragged, dirty, shoeless, hatloss children, without manners, instruction, or bread*! W^e walked on, a sadder, if not a better man.  Oil Springs in the Indian Country.—^These Springs are in the territory of the Chickasaw Indians, and are thus desci^cd by the corre.s^n-dent of the Port Smith Herald: •  "The Old Springs are about twenty-five miles in a north-west direction from Fort Washita, on the east side of the False Washita; and about three miles from it, on a stream of beautiful clear water that has a fall, or sueeessive falls, of near ninety feet. The oil exudes from the rock or cliff overhanging these falls iTi drops of tiie size of a goose quill, having the taste, smell, and consistency of British Oil. It has been told me that this Oil and t he'water with w'hich it mingles? has, by drinking and rubbing externally, effected some of the mo.^i, a.«tonishing cures of chronic rheumatism and mercurial aireerions that have ever been known. Persons have been carried there doubled up with diticase or emaciated to skeletons, coming away, in a very short time, cured perfectly, with a new léase on dear life."  Exercises—Fresh Air—Health,—-Dow aing" s l^orticulturist expatiates on the advantage to our women of often seeking the air and using abundant exercise, as the true means of preserving health and imparting to beauty a more captivating freshness. An excellent article hereon finishes thus:  A word or two more, and upon what ought to be the most important argument to all. Exercise, frish air, health—are they not almost synonymous? The exquisite bloom on the chocks of American girls fade in the matron much soonei: here than in England—not only because of the softness of thé English climate as many suppose. It is because "exercise, so necessary toHjie. maintenance of health, so little a matter of habit and education here,'and so largely insisted uj/on in England; and it is because exercise, when/aken here at all, is too often as a matter of duty; and has no soul in it; while the English womSn who takes a lively interest in her rural employments, inhales new life in every day's occupation, and plants perpetual roses in her chceks, by the mere act of planting them in her garden.  The Pennsylvania Legislature eleet'will stand as follow.s:  Dem. Whigjf  Senate, » ■ ^^  House, * 60 40  BO YOV REAliliV TllIx\K HE DID?  1 waited till the twilight.  And yet he did not come: I strayed along the brook side.  And slowly wandered hume; When who should come behind me,  Put him I would have chide; He said he came to find ine— Do you really think ho did?  He said, since last we parted,  Hjp'd thought of naught so sweet, As of this very moment— ■^The moment we should meet. He shewed me where, half iihaded,  A collage home lay hid; • He said for me he made it— Do you really think he did?  IIe«aid when first lie saw me, Lile seemed at once divine; Each night he dreiript of angels,  And every liice was miiie; Sometimes a voice, in sleeping,  VVould all his hopes forbid. And then lie wakened weeping— Do you really think he did!  from the' Katioual Era.  The Bachelor of W.-A true Störy  BY M.ARTHA RUSSELt.  CHAPTER I.  '"^'.^"»'e. «pints touch the atrines Ot that mysterious instrument, the s^ ® Ana play Ihe prelude of our fdie. We i,e.r The voice prophetic, and die not nionl  . Nearly three-quarters of a century npo wl,„t  18 now the pretty town of W in Pnifi^u ' I ^^ youngest, was ieft alone. He who tem-but a sparsely populated Lmlef b'TT' the shorn lamb provided a home  Folding her sfcawl-mòre closely abòutier, l.e drew her arm within his, and, in that mystic language whiob is never ri^tly'served'save con a-moi-e; strova to infuse into her drapònding nund something of his T>wn hopeful q)uit^' whil0 they slowly wended their way hprnewarid. -  Margaret Sefden Was of Sisote'h descent—the last representative of a family, notedj among our grave forefathers, for its imaginative tendencies, combined with rare talents. Her ancestors had early embraced the tenets of the Covenanters, and . had testified to thè faith by imprisonment, fines, and on the battle field. Her father, foreseeing the" fatal rebellion of 17-45; and wishing to escape its hócròrs, cast his lot among his English brethren, and sought in the wilds of New Ifegland th^t boon ibr which his soul had pined amid his native' mountains'^pe\co. WiUi a Ruth-like trust in her husband's wisdom, but a still deeper faith in her Father in Heaven, the wife of his youth g^ered abont her her little brood of children, aim stood by his side Wie a household* angel, a-mid all the'toils and privations of a pioneer life.  In a few short years, they found that pcaed which passeth all understaildingi thè portal td whieh is the grave. Onif by one,- six òr sevótì ikir children were gathered to thein, and Margaret, the youngest, was left alone. He who tem-  forest-erowned Ìulls,"'thr'8wel"rng upla^í the - • aeccíions; but th'eré  bubbling springs, and much the same as nc-'- —  GUI  yj none spoke more eloquently w  ------, were  hfe and liberty^ none spoke mor«  more successfully to their hearts, than theVe same qu^t preachers of Freedom and Lov".  tion, farmers^ and their quaint, puritanic old hoo  ses, with their sloping rc^ft. or mass^e .timber^^^  were deeply cliaracteristic of the spWt S the On the main street; at time of which  sto«d a house which strong-nerved m«n, as he gazed on her pure browi  domiic windows, the strangely onmmented pillars that supported the lan'-like peoiection over the door, but above all, the scuttle in the roof, made it alto«pther unique in the eyes of the good  ' the itairs were  nmshed, there was-scarcely a damsal in the village that did not ascend them to take a view of the landscape, and fascinate the lover who attended her with the usually display of coquettish timidity. The long row of young elms^ front of the house; the thrifty rose bushes, with • their leaf buds.just swelling beneath the influence of tiiewarm winds of spring; the careful neatness with which everything like the rubbish of build-mg had been removed from the deep,-smootii door yard, indjcated that the house was a temple •of liope and promise, And so it Was. The very stillness that, as yet, brooded over it was even more significant than noiso. or laughter, for it symbolyzed the deep happiness, the bush of awe and expecation, that stilled the throbbine pulses opargaret Selden and Henry Pemberton, as they thought of the h&ur when the blessin» of Father Miles and the sanction of the law vrould consecrate to tiie worid the love that had gr#íFn with their years, and so interlaced its. delicate fibres around their hearts that they seemed trulv one and indivisible. '  It was the March of 1775, and one of those warm balmy days that seem full of prophesies of summer, when young Pemberton led his betrothed bride oyerüieir new house, and spoke to her of their future, seemingly clear and bright as the pathway of the sun.  'Three wscks more, Maggie,' he said, drawing her to him, as they stood by the window, in the little room he designed especially for her, «and you will be mine, wholly.' In just three weeks, these rooms wUl ring with the merry congratulations of our bridal party; but, welcome as they will be, how gladly shall I exchange them for the quiet ofhome, and the smile of-my own dear wiie. Look yonder!' he continued, pointing to the. glowing west. 'Is not yonder sunset like  came hours when she ciuld no! help feeling deeply her isolated position; hours in ^hifch she felt almost willing to take death by the hand, and pass ^rough his dark and shadowy realm, to be permitted onee moig to look upon the faces of her -belbved friends.  Possessed of that delicate physical organization, whieh, like the fensitiye plants seem to have a fore-feeling of all that awaits it—tall, fragile,' and grtceful—she had, like the harebell of her ' fathers native mounia^ns, rooted herself strongly and deej)ly in the apparently stem,- but really kind hearts of those -around her; and inwy a  "fe^ainiïy^lœî; with ft glance ol mingled fondness and anxiety at his own young daughters, put up an earnest prayer that God would have both them and hèr in his holy keeping."  Traditionary Idrfe-i-^the' supcrsiitions Of à nation that are crooned over thé cradle, and whispered in lojv murmurs of the çoSîn and the grave —cap never bo completely driten from their hold on the heart by any Cbiiftge of forms or creèds,-though the influx of higher tmtb may teach us to give them a clearer significance. Therefore, Puritanism, that wàrred with stich blind ze%I á-gainst the iHystici.«m of the Quàlîers, and the absurd, and, were it not for the sorrowful phase it gives of human life, ludicrous charlataqpes of the weird grandams of Salcm^ enfolded within ltd pale and sheltered beneath its foof iHkúy spirits of the same kin—children of the same mystèrious. mother. -Such were the various forewarniñgsof misforfuhe and death—Hnaysterious knoeldngs at the door—faint lights glimmering in old ,ohurçfa-yards—dark chambers—winding-sheet iff tnê flame of the candle—and thé brighter presages of good fortune read in the various' áppeataoces of the blazing fire, (alas! for the superstitions in this era of stoves!) or the coming of fr stranger, atí-nounced by Sir Chanticleer upon the dooifvstep, and the universal belief wltii regard toJPridày as a day of ill luck, which, even at iJie present time, influences not a few of our country people^  Though the good wifes of W, wore not more superstitious than their neighbors, yet thèse "old saying|' constantly on their lips, .were not without thcir.influences on one of Margaret's temperament and imaginative tendencies.- Biit moré than all, the legends and endless stories of an pld Scotch servant tended to strengthen inTíiér the love ibr the marvel^s'and supernatural. This old women had folluwSHicr parents to this country, and now clung with tcnacious fondness to the last child of her fiither s house. Old Elâpeth wai a complete Scotch Edda. Her girlhood had bectí passed amid the Highlands; and thoâe wOd regions, with their still wlider super^itions, seemed  More Poetical Leettr-ature.—A letter passed through the post-office at Chicag o, piloted by the Ibllowing .snperscriptif>n. If it does not reach its de.stination, it 'hot be, remarks the editor of the Journal, for the want of poetical Icet:  '*As birds their food to young ones bring,  Nor fear that they shall lose it. Go wing your way lo Charles A. Spring  From Boston, .Vlusfachusett—■: He's now on the PacifiT shore—  They call it San Francisco-He's gone to dig for golden ore.  We wish'd him sale at home once uio-j. Jovitic our heurls jiisl a» before— ' Twoul'l (nako i.s all so 'brisl:, olii.  our love? bee, how it glorifies earth and sky,'ever present to her memory; She had tales, of and scatters these dark clouds tinging them witii 'mountain and rock—of the glen and locl^f faite own g orioushues. Surely it is an omen of mily feuds and bloody civil wars-^legends of o-future, iull of hope and prortiise.' 'mehsand wraiths—and Maggie would sit for  Ihe tair girl did not reply, but stood'watching" hours by her wheel, listening to these tales^ while toe sunset, as it it were indeed the omen of their the low hum of ^he fliers kept up a kindof mono-^ tuture. Presently Henry felt the arm that lay so tonous accompaniment to the old woman's voice; conhdingly within his tremble, and an indistinct. But when she lowered her voice, and allowed the indehnite tear filled his heart, as he saw the dark jflax to slip from her fingers, while she spoke of clouds ot which ho spoke, close rapidly over the ; thé mysterious glitt of second sight—of the yisi-sun, and the rosy glow of the sky give place to a jonary experiences and presentiments of the Seera dreary leaden hue. Instinctively, as if he would'of Uie land, and told how this fearful gift had ward oti some unknown evil, he threw his arm distingui.<ibed several of Maggie's aneessors—the around her waist, and drew her to him. Her face ghl listened with breathless interest, and hei" was white as death, and, with a voice quivering deep, spiritual eye took a still more concentrated wit^ suppressed emotion, she said: expression, as if she was trying to question her  'See Henry, yon light has gone out in dwk- own soul, and prove by her own experience' ness ! bo will it be witii our future. Nay,' ^e wheUier this gift was inherent in the blood of her continued, seeuig him about to speak, 'listen to | race.  me., For some weeks you have urged me to tell j This tendency, fostered as it was by tho iso-you the cause of my sadness; I ôould not, .for I lated position and her yearning sorrow for the did not well understand it myself. It was like ' death of her family, gave to her manner a singU-the mist over tiie river yonder, shapeless and un- ' lar dreaminess—a tlioughtfuhicss far beyond her dehned, but penetrated my soul with its chilling : years—a circumstance that gave much pleasure breatii. JJiow it^is more palpable; like yon cloud, j to wortijy, ortiiodox- couple that had adopted her It stands between me and lite-between me and as a doughter; for, a^ tiie old man said; it msH you, Henry; for, she went on,'hiding her white sure proof tiiat the good seed tiiey had so dfli-iace, damp with the dew of agony, in his breast, ! gentiy to sow, had not fallen on stony ground»«-'It IS death-speedy and suddtn death, from However this might be, we know thiit thé wtirin which even your love, cannot shield me.' glances and loving words of young Henry Pem-  'Margaret!' cried the young man, terrified at berton had quicke^ed within bet heart the 'Ce-the strangeness of her manner and her words, ¡lestial seed down dropt from Paradlsé,' and foru are you mad? For God's sake overcome these jlong time old EIspeth'â weird notes of visions and distempered fancies.' dreams had been forgotten in tiife sweeter T)ne of  «r fancies, Henry—'Love. Henry was in every way wortiiy of her.  Would to Heaven they were!' she said raising Notwitiistanding the strict discipline and peeuli-her head, and looking mournfully in his face.— ar influence of tho tenets in which he had* béen 'For weeks and months I have struggled against rigidly trained, there Was a vein ofroinânôei ând ^is conviction—Struggled as-only those-who imagination in his character, and that ih" othei" love as I do, can struggle—but* I cannot escape ' times and under other circumstances, would have my destiny. I have refused to reply to your ' led him to the performance of deeds vrorthy of questions, because I could not bear to cloud the the 'Chronicle of Froisart.-' brightness of your anticipations. But, believe me, the fate of my family is upon me, and'—  'iJut tiiey all died of consumption, Maggie,' he eagerly interrupted, as he pressed a kiss upon her uplifted brow, 'Surely, you have nothing of that, lour cheei: is fresh and round as a babe's, only a little pale of late, owing to over-exertion about our house-keeping aflairs. You are really getting nervous. I will send Dr. G. to see you tomorrow.  "It will be of no use. I am not nervous. If this was not serious, earnest conviction, which I cauiiot escape, do you think i would inflict upon you all tho pain that I know my words must give you. Not one of my father's largo family lived to see twenty years, and I feel that their tate is to bb mine. Uh! if it were not for you,' she con-  Legal Practice in CalifQrnia.  A lot;u!- »•) tii.-i-iHthc-i: iVooi . yvMinw Nf^« York lawyoi- rccoiuly ioc:-uc(! Ätn Fran-¡ncidt'iilaüy moniior,;« 1I10 folinwinn  ;hc{ = :-  '^Whei! I :n-rivc',l lU'Vi", < vui vUiÍulí i>-irii,..tv ■JO'.ico svas ill a .s'ali.- ol uiro' iiv — nu ilBfí^ii.'ii<lin;í t'> lie a !iiwy»i'. . '.t pi.•'.cnrc, ii-í»n  -».'iMi»;!. I íi:i))¡ii;imd :<> tuiv.: I- I c.niiv of th^ iiKW Co'ie Ol Sim- h-si-.ancy suj  t.ií.- ! Vi • '■.I 'hi'll), Mii.t  •• io; It^ii IS ho P, U' • j ^11. h .'t ifiiiaiiis.--  1 (M-i i'ii. .\.iies in pio :k, tjui he.e it giv<;.s univer.Ha!  to Legal P ao! nejiriv i-verv . having a ' tT his own .S i i brouiT'i 'vit ' ^ New r >.k, t gpsted 1 il il was '111 f .x •. ■ iC" <•• oil!- ( . i---, .  MMIll -ll (I ill .l'I fu-edi ti ii.iilei a in N' W Y' s»ej4ts till- vt-rv iliiiiji '»"d  I A  o • •■  ■■'•i-  xiiTI-ioîion "  £vVf- liave pmmeP'tUii "nbnve trom recol-leciioii uf the cooieiits of ihe letter, which w.-is H private O'.ie, «iid is not n'>w within r«;r<-h ; but ihe substance is as above.]—N. Y. TrV'Une.  A California Adventurer.—Some time since a young gentleman ot this citv, not regularly eng iged in trade, had the curiosity to  the r« d shadow of i>ro.spect'v<i wa.-.—New i'.  The taliforuia Fleet —Ol 463 vessels which, ncconlinsr to the Shipping List, have sailed from the United States for California since the commrincnment of the California gold fever, only 95 had arrived tip to Sept. 1.  sent out 60 barrel." of < ider, which cost him a l,arrel. The freight was $3 more, making $9 a bnrrel, or a total expenditure ol $400. Subsequently be. parted with a share in the adventure to a friend. They have just learned the result. cider sold in Call o/-  nia for $l20 a barrel, yielding if total of $6-000, nine tenths of which are clear profit,—  Witit more than a mother's sóìie'itudej he watched every mood of tiic fair girl wHoihhè felt. to be his destiny. But for some months past a shadow bad been gathering qn her brow, and still ^ more darkly over her heart, that even hiV love ' could not dissipate. Weird-liltè aiid int^ingible it rose between them, and fell upon Màggie''» ■ budding hopes like the first handful of fresh eaorth on the eoffin of one we lotè. In vain Hen^ strove to ascertain the cause of her sadness.— Sometimes she would attempt to reply, but the words died on her llpsj ànd she would' gaze, at him w^yuch an intense, mournful expres^sion^ that hMlbofe to urge the question.  Their marriage was to take place in April. As tho spring opened Margaretts mood grew even more changeable,- and her despondency seemed tinned passionately, in a voice broken by sobs, "I to increase. The-good friends smiled and talked cogld bear it all. But my heart clings so to of maiden timidity and bashfulness; b^it Henry earth for your sake—life with you seemed so know her too well to be deceived. The d^y on rich and beautiful. Oh ! it is so hard to die so ' which we introduced thom to the reader, Marga-young—to lie down in a cold, dark grave, wliere | ret had striven earnestiy for strength"^ enable yi)ur love cannot reach me" She paused, over- ber to speak calmly to her lover ofthefeaiful  coniu hy hc-r emotion, and, before Henry could trust ins vuii,o to reply, again went on—'I sometimes think I have done wrong in thus winding myself around your heart, Henry. I should have remembered that I was foredoomed, and avoided a love which could only end in desolation and death. But I was alone; and it is so beautiful to love and be beloved. Can you forgive this selfishness?'  'Selfishness, Maggie. Do not thus wrong yourself and me. You are tho light of my life. Before I felt your love, I was careless, thoughtless as my companions. Now, I foel the true dignity of life. Through your love I have become purified and enobled, and, whatever be the result, I shall never cease to thank God for showing that there are divine realities even on this side of the grave. And now, Margaret,' he continued in a lighter tone, after a few moments silence, 'you have uttered your sad predictions of our future, listen to mine: Yon dark oloud that crossed over the sun so inopportunely, is but the symbol of your present mood. Beyond it shines the sun clear and bright as our love< Clouds may and doubtless will come; but our love shall scatter thom, or by its . potent alchemy, change them into blessings/  Cheered by his hopeful-tone, and relieved and in some degree tranquilized by confessing to him that sorrowful presentim^t that weighed so heavily upon her for some weeks past, Margaret Selden returned the pressure of his handj and said niore chiierfully and tvith great earnestness.' —'Heaven grant you may be right, Henry.— When those dark, weary thoughts that seem td press the life from my heart, come again, your words to me shall- be angels of hopej  With a bright, happy smile, Henry pointed to the Evening Star that just then broke throueh a rift ih the'dark cloud, tinging its jagged edges with silver, and whispered in her ear«—  ♦See, love, another beautiful omen.'  presentiments that were impressed ùpòii her mind with a power and vividness that amountèd to conviction. We have seen what they were; wo do not pretend to explain or account for them. We singly know that they were, and can only say, in the words of one who was an honof to our country and our age* 1 have lived too long and seen too much to be incredulous/ [CVmcftiiion next veci:.]  Erpcdiii-m of Sir John Franklin —1'hc Cleveland P;aindeuler of the .5th inst. has tt letter dated "S'e Maiie River," Septj ^Sih announcing '.bearrival of Sir John Richardson, from the fruitless seari h èfter tlié Ìoèt Polar e.\pt-ditionofSir John Franklin, of whoso dreadful-fate among the?*iccs of the Arcttco Ocean there is left little or no.room todou^. Sir John Richardson, having failed to find even the remotest clue to the Franklin E.^-pedition, is now on his way back to England. He left there in April, 1848, and from the Sault Ste. IVJarte has made t^e voyage in canoes and boats and ovct'land, a distance of three thousand and five hundred miles and back: by way nf Lake of the Woods, Mackenzie's River, &c. After reaching tho, Arctic Ocen, they travelled five hundred miles along the tho coast. He speaks confidentlic of the existence of a northern passage; practicability, he says, is another question, the sum-' mers being only from. 30- to 00 days long.— He goes by way uf Toronto» and Montreal to Boston^  Lr. Clay reached home from his northern the night of the 18th instant, his health trip, on materiilly improved.   

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