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Fort Wayne Sentinel Newspaper Archive: June 13, 1912 - Page 1

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Publication: Fort Wayne Sentinel

Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana

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   Fort Wayne Sentinel, The (Newspaper) - June 13, 1912, Fort Wayne, Indiana                               a Smag WHO we -CUT OUR. NDICAT1ONS: SHOWERS LATE TO- NIQMT OR JfRIDAY; WARMER. WT STEAM ROllER Roosevelt Gets Four Delegates-at-Large from Missouri by a Unaminous Vote of the Committee. NEW OffiS ESTABLISHED 1833--ONLY FORT WAYNE EVENING PAPER WITH ASSOCIATED PRESS DISPATCHES. DAILY. 1 CENT. 5 CENTS. I THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE The New Way Seems to Work Well Chicago, June )3.--Four delegates-at- I large from Missouri were credited to Colonel Roosevelt by unanimous vote of the republican national committee this afternoon. Thc motion was made by Senator Pen- rose, of Pennsylvania, and the decision of the committee gave victory to Gov- ernor Hadley in the strenuous fight he has been making to secure the seating of the Roosevelt delegates against the claims of the Taft element, which ap- peared as contestant in the Missouri cases. Hadley is One of Them. The delegates seated by. agreement of the Roosevelt double delegation of eight wer Gov, Hadly, Jesse A. Tolerton, Wal- ter S. Dickey, Hugh Mclndoe. The balance of the Roosevelt delega- tion were seated as alternates. They were Gov: Hadley, Jesse A. Tolerton, Walter S. Dickey, Hugh Mclndoe. Taft Wins Elsewfcere. Contests in six Mississippi districts, the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth. Seventh and Eighth, were decided in favor of the Taft delegates at the forenoon session .of the committee. While ostensibly this action adde( twelve votes to the Taft column, one ol the delegates declared entitled to a seat P. W. Howard, of the Eighth district- appeared on both the Taft and Roose v'elt delegations under conflicting instruc tions. Questioning by Committeeman mem bers with a view of .determining which camp Howard could be counted failed to-bring from him state- ment, but'it asserted by his-attor- neys that 'he would heed the Roosevelt instructions.' Tike Cases.., With the Mississippi cases disposed 6i the national committee toolc up the Mis- souri contests involving fourteen seats in the convention: Gov. Hartley's Roose- velt delegate-at-larg'e, is challenged by the Taft supporters and Taft delegations from the Fifth, Seventh and Fourteenth districts oppose the regu- lar delegations instructed for Roosevelt. The case of the delegation at.terge was called first. Governor Hadley Ready. The committee planned to hear con tests from Mississippi'trds.morning, pick ing them -up where they left off last nigh after voting to seat .the' Taft delegates n thc First district. The work'late yes terday afternoon included the awarding of the six delegates-at-large from Michi gan to the president. .Contests were be v EFFORT TO v MR- IS A FAILURE. Chicago, Jltfjc motion to exclude Francis J. Heney, of San Francisco, from the republican na- i- tional committee on the ground that he was a democrat, was made i> this Committeeman W. S. Sturgcss, of Arizona. Mr. Heney had pjtsented, a proxy of Thomas liiorson, of South Dakota. Mr. Sturgess said j 'the records showed Rency had run for prosecuting attorney on the democratic' ticket in San Francis- co. Mr. Heaey denied the charge. He said he had refused the demo- j era tic nomination, 'had run on an j >J> independent ticket and had been 1 defeated by the "money of Pat- rick Calhoun." The committee refused to ex- clude Mr. Heney, laying the mo- tion on the table. over the delegates-at-large, the Taft i forces claiming the regularity over Gov. lladle.y and. the Roosevelt supporters. Will Hurry Matters. When the committee adjourned. last night it was with a determination to hasten hearings to. a conclusion and to ispose of Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina and Oklahoma contests today if. ARE YOU WEIGHS POUNDS ME SEALER. AS QUICK rou OF mon AT Roosevelt Manager Declares Member of Committee Was Offered Federal Job if He Voted for Tart New charges of attempted bribery in the buttle for deleRnteB were made to- day by Senator Dixon, campaign inau- ;iber for Colonel Roosevelt. He charged that a member of the re- publican national rommittee liad been iillcrrd I'nitfil States marshalship if would vote for Taft on the contests imw under riin.iiderntion. Says He Can Name the Man. "I :iin to name the man, if wiM Senator "1 Bent word to tin' I'ommitteeman that any frilenil appoint ment made in the nature of n bribe for Taft vote.? would be held up in the senate." Senator Dixon dared the Taft man- agers to be specific and give the name of the Roosevelt leader who is reported to have offered a bribe to n delegate in Alabama and the name of the man who received the money. It WHS reported that the Taft man- agers hnve under consideration the in- troduction of n resolution in the. con- vention requiring all delegates to voto according to the instructions given by j their states until released by the can didate. Taft leaders, after a canvass of thi situation, declared they expected to con i trol the credentials committee by vote of 32 to 21. Delegates Talk Dark Horse. Many delegates to .the republican con vention who arrived in the early hours today talked of the advisability of a dark horse candidate for president In the hope of bringing party harmony and success. The leaders while hoping that some olution of the problem may be brought orward at the eleventh hour, appirent- y fenl that the lines of battle between 'aft and Roosevelt have been so sharply rawn and such high feeling aroused hat the fight will have to be fought to finish between the president ana CoL loosevelt. Everybody is Confident Tnft supporters apparently, were confident of success than ever after yes- :erday's victory in the contests before, the national committee and freely reiter- ated their predictions of the renoxnina- Lion of the president op the first ballot. Roosevelt managers declared that their candidate would have the necessary 540 votes to secure the nomination on the first ballot. The followers of Senator of Iowa, and Senator LaFollette, of Wis- consin, are expressing the opinion that there will be no choice on the first bal- lot leaving the inference that they hope their men may be decided on as a com- prorriis candidate. Senator Elihu Root, of New York, the (Continued on Page Z. Column 1.) But twenty-five members of the com- nittec were present at the opening .6t ;oday's session, and the, con test..in the of' Mississippi wa -the first called. At -the suggestion of Com- mitteeman Penrose, attorneys for both side? agreed to-consolidate, the Second, Fourth. Sixth" and .Seventh'Mississippi districts.. Arguments on-these'cases col- lectively were then begun. 1 At the outset Dean E. Ryman, attor- ney for the Roosevelt contestarlts, said it would be shown that no conventions were held in these 'districts at which Taft' delegates were' regularly elected. Race Clash a Factor. Mr. Ryman. declared the White voters MR.UHEYER Cortelyou is a in "Money Trust" Inquiry. OTHER FELLOWS THE PANIC DEPOSIT -New York. June George B. Cor- telyou, secretary of. the. treasury under President .Roosei-elt, was called to the Taft .Crowd is at It This Very Says Roosevelt. IEN PILED IN WILL I PIPE IIS ARE NETOHE1ST CALLEHOTIME Opening of Panama Canal They Are Common Carriers Will Make Immigration Vital Subject. CONFERENCE AT WORK __, _, TT Cleveland, Ohio, June host Were. Sleeping in Upper of (lelegiltes tojthe 3Sth annual confer- Under Decision of. the Committee, Story of Restaurant Building. HIS IRE IS AROUSED [TWO CHILDREN JUMP in tiie districts refused to allow negro gtand today at t, of the PUJO voters to participate in any conventions.- cornmittce investigating the so-called "As showing the prejudice Against negro money trust; to the manner in which the government deposited in voters, it lieed be said only__ that .in .one year in Lincoln county alone 185 men were for participating in lynch- ings." said Mr.. Ryman. fore the. committee in the Second, Fourth, i ROOSevelt "republicans determined Fifth, Sixth. Seventh and Eighth Missis- to tiie''ric'groes a chance, and we sippi districts. With the'Mississippi contests disposed (if, the contests in .Missouri. follow and Gov. Hadley, leader of the contested del- esriition, who for s.everal days has been sitting on the committee on a proxy, urepared to defend. MmselfHand his co- horts of the Roosevelt -faction a'gainst claims of the Taft champions. The principal fight in Missouri centers came here cd on thi son, a negro the com- mittee "'to take such action either 'to prevent the negro delegates being elected or to accept them when they are elect- ed." He asked the committee to reopen the contests of the Mississippi dclcgates- (Contimied on- Paso 2. Column 1.) the New York National banks to help" stem the panic of 1907. Samuel Untermeyer, counsel for the committee, attempted to learn the names of the banks in which the money was re with delegates regularly elect- j deposited, but Mr. Cortelyou said his iis basis.'-' he sa'i'd. E. Molli- ruemorv on this subject was poor. Elopers Have Returned and Are Cele- brating Their Honeymoon The witness said he came here on the night of Oct. 22, 1907. and conferrec with J. P. Morgan, James Stillman. A Barton Hepburn. George F. Baker George W. Perkins, Frank A. Vanderli and other financiers. At another confer ence the witness said he 'promised 000.000 for distribution among the banks "Was there anything said as to wher these funds should be what banks "I don't recall." Mr. Untermeyer asked thc witness i anything was said about the high rate of call money and the effect on the stock exchange of the failure to get money here, Cortelyou started to give an ex- j planation and was asked sharply to.re- i ply to the, question. "You know Mr. Untermeyer.'-' he said, 'there are questions I cannot answer yes or no without doing myself an injustice. T have a right to make an explanation of my position and I propose, to exercise it tight." This brought forth cheers from the brokers and bankers looking on and a declaration from Chairman Pujo that he would have ejected any one repeating it. Mr. Cortelyou finally said lie "probably did have such n discussion but could not recnll the _____________ Oyster Bay, N. Y., June re bolting from the republican party t this said Colonel Rooae- elt- last night of supporters of Presi- ent Taft on the republican nationcl ommittee. The former president was aroused to fighting mood by the news which eached him yesterday over his private vires from Chicago. He denounced vith all the emphasis he could com- mand the action of the natiqnal com- mittee in deciding the contests for seats n the national convention from Keu- Aicky, Arizona and California. He de- clared "that the thirty-seven Taft sup- (Continued on Page 2. Column 7.) Frankfort, Ind., June per- sons sleeping in rooms above the restaur- ant of Mrs. Ella Sclierer narrowly es- caped death early today when (ire swept the interior of the building. John Scherer, 11, 'and Edmond Schercr, 13, umpcd from the second story and were painfully cut. Mrs. Sclierer and her two jther. children were rescued from the roof of the veranda. ence of charities and corrections bent upon putting in a full week of work, gathered early today for a general ses- sion, .at which brief oral reports from the various states and territories were submitted, showing the progress of the work on which! the organization is en- gaged. Appointment of committees and other business of the conference was considered. The conference later -was to break.into sections, each considering MUST OBEY THE LAW Washington, June interstate commerce commission' today held that pipe line companies transporting oil be- tween the states are common carriers, with the obligations of' such, and or- dered thirteen of the largest oil pipe lines to file schedules' of rates by September 1 and to comply with the provisions of the interstate commerce act. It is the conclusion of the commission that the congress in designating oil pipe' lines as "common carriers" meant pre- cisely what-was said in the statute. Tha commission matters within its own scope. That the obligations of a common car- One coii- j rier are Up0n a pipe line en- MEETS HORRIBLE DEATH. Lafayette. Ind., June Caine. aged 27, was dragged to death by a Wabash freight train here this morn- ing. He boarded the train at Danville, 111., and fell asleep on a flat car. He rolled off as the train sped along and his foot became fastened in a brake beam. He was dragged miles and his body was ground to a pulp. His home was in Cleveland, Ohio. sidered housing and recreation and an-j in tlle transportation of oil in other children. f i interstate commerce even though tuch' Before the latter section- the chief was built QVer its M. feature scheduled was an address by and tra rts only Wilbur C. Phillips, secretary of the i jt_ own oi] child welfare committee, of Milwaukee j' j; u Wis., on a community plan lor infant jnterstate chavacter by placing the ownership of the pipe line 'in different welfare work. Arguing that the Pacific const is in actual need of having the 1913 meeting in one of its cities, delegates from Seat- light to have the next conference there. With the opening of the Panama. said a delegate today, "a vast horde of European immigrants, attract- Gen. Bixby Assures Mr. Cline Work Will Be Thorough. ANSBERRY LENDS AID 1NSTRUCTOR AT WEST POINT. "Lawrenceburg. Ind.. June j Robert E. O'Brien, of the United States array, stationed at Fort Sheridan, 111., I has been appointed instructor of mathe- matics at West Point and will com- jmencc the first week in September. Lieut. O'Brien is the son of Wm. II. O'Brien, state auditor. FEARS "BLACK HAND." Indianapolis. Ind.. June Vivian Stokes, of Chicago, under the de- lusion that agents of the blnckhnnd were corporations in each state through which the transportation passes, or by trans- ferring title to the oil to each of sucn corporations as the oil enters the pipes of that corporation. The pipe lines against which the com- mission's order is directed are: bv cheaper'transportation rates, will Oklahoma Pipe Line_company. Prairie wur'into the Pacific coast cities, "it Oil and Gas company Standard 0.1 Coin- lighlv necessary that the people out pany of Louisiana, Ohio Oil company, there" be awakened to the situation and Standard Company of jSew Jersey, instructed in time as to -the proper Tidewater Pipe company. Ltd., Producers means of dealing with the immigration' and Refiners Oil company, Ltd., United T .ivirt TIT T'liro fill question "So far western cities have States Pipe Line company. Pure Oil com- had to j pany. Pure Oil Pipe Line company, Ka- contend with almost none of the prob- j tional Pipe Line company, Uncle Sam lems that the Atlantic seaboard cities Oil company and Uncle Sam Oil Corn- have faced." i pany of Kansas. (Continne.rt on Page 2, Column 6.) Why the Cistern Went Dry o There will be no delay in the survey for the. proposed deep waterway between Toledo and Lake Michigan by way of the Maurnec river and Fort Wayne, and the work will be exhaustive and com- _ _ plete when it is undertaken i 'Old KallltUck Will ShoUtf Assurances to this effect have been j J i uistressc Sims and His Panama at Chicago. given Congressman Cyrus Cline. and Con- I i T. T. Ansbcrrv. of the Defiance j Staff Photo. MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL ORMSBY, JR When Mr. and Mrs. Samtirl Ormsby, jr.. posed for Thc Sentinel today they hnd not sought the forgiveness of Meriam Major, mother of thc bride, who wn? formerly Miss M.yrl Major, :v high school student, and they still had this ordwl before them, but felt con- thcy were welcomed by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ormsby. parents of thc groom, who 1mA no objection to thc marriage and who seemed proud of their new daughter-in-law. They left Fort Wayne early yesterday 1 morning over the G. R. 1. and hid j no difficulty obtaining a marriage li- lident that it wouH rx  -wounded the woman, according to provincial constables arrived here last aight with MacDonald as their prisoner. MacDonald is a fanner at Flaharton, Mann. WILLIAM 0. BRADLEY, NK DAY when 1 got home from work." said A. Fox, of the Perfection Biscuit company's wlio lives sit 130S West Wayne "1 found the household much :Cd over thc fact that thc cistern j had suddenly gone dry. It was nearly full the day before, a.nd we had had-a j little rain "in night, and the cir- j cumstances seemed strange in the ex- :rcme. 1 had a man come out and examine the cistern for leaks, but he couldn't find anything that looked like a sure- enough crack, but he went down into! it and made'' some repairs for luck any- t way. Well, when it rained again we watched the cistern anxiously and were gratified to find that it held water all richt. 'Gradually it filled up again, and we had almost" forgotten thc previous experience when, one day- after nn ex- tra hard rain, we found the cistern en- tirely' empty again. "Wo were I began to do a iftic scientific investigating, and what do yon suppose was the solution? Give it up? Well. sir. some time aeo I bought, a patent arrangement by which a cistern clrans itself. It consists of r-ipos so arranccd that when a cistern .ntirely full, it overflows into the in such H way as to take the water from the bottom of the cis United States senator from Kentucky, who has' been invited or Taft to sec- ond the president's nomination. first, instead of causinc the top water to nin off as is the case with the ordinary overflow from a cistern Well, the thing "He Couldn't find anything." are a good many of the appliances m use in Fort Wayne, but in my case it was a Jonah. Why? Well, you see, my lot on West Wayne street is so sit- uated that the sewer is lower than the bottom of my cistern. When the -water in the cistern commenced to overflow the pipes formed a siphon and the thing stop running until the ciittrm   

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