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Fort Wayne Sentinel Newspaper Archive: October 23, 1899 - Page 3

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Publication: Fort Wayne Sentinel

Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana

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   Fort Wayne Sentinel, The (Newspaper) - October 23, 1899, Fort Wayne, Indiana                               OCT. a THE MARKETS, Chicago, Oct. All markets on 'change today developed considerable strength in marked contrast to the course pursued during last week. In- dependent strength at Liverpool and dry weather throughout the south- west caused a change of sentiment in and that market started strong. Buying was quite general, while the selling pressure, so pro- nounced of late, was conspicuously absent. The price got above call fig- ures early in the session and selling against those privileges and some profit taking resulted in a slight re- action for a time, but offerings were readily absorbed and the market for the most part ruled strong with th? price tending upwards. The strength in com and a decrease on ocean passage, where a large in- crease had been expected, also stipu- lated the buying movet.er.t. Decem- ber opened a shade higher at 70c, advancd to reacted to and rose again to Chicago received 222 cars, 9 of which were of graded contract. Min- neapolis and Duluth got cars, compared with for the same day last year. World's shipments last week were bushels, and amount on passage decreased bushels. Indications Were that the visible supply would increase nearly 000 bushels. Cora ruled strong and active. The advance was due to good buying, owing to numerous claims of disappointing husking results aud a steady decrease in stocks. Receipts were 553 cars. December opened higher at to and advanced to Oats were active and higher in sympathy with other grains. Coun- try buying, was a feature. Receipts were 352 cars. December opened higher at and rose to Better prices for hogs and the ad- vance in grains strengthened pro- visions. Trade was small, however, but offerings were light. A large reduction in stock helped to maintain the advance. January pork opened 5c higher at and advanced to January lard opened higher at and rose to and January ribs ruled higher at THE CLOSE. Prices at the close were as follows: Dec., May, Oct., Dec., Jan., May, Oct., Dec., 22% May, Oct., Dec., Jan., Oct., Dec., Jan., Oct., Dec., Jan., Cash N. W., W., Oct., May, Cash S. Dec., CHICAGO LIVE STOCK. Chicago. Oct. re- ceipts of hogs today, tomor- row, left over, Mar- ket steady, higher, active. Mixed and butchers, good heavy, rough heavy, light, 4.45. Market steady. Beeves. cows and heifers, stockers and feeders, THE DAY ON WALL STREET. Brooklyn Transit, Tobttco and grangers were leaders. There was realising again at some points under cover of the riae. This made the clov- ing irregular at net gains in nearly all cases, which extended as a rule from 1 to over 3 points. NEW YORK PRODUCE. New York, Oct. ceipts, 8.050 pkgs; market steady; western creamery, June creamery, factory, 17c. pkgs; mar- ket dull; large white, small white, large colored, small colored, pkgs; mar- ket steady; western ungraded at mark, firm; fair refining, 3 l-16c; centrifugal, 96 test, 4 5-16c; molasses sugar, 3 9-16c; refined, steady; crushed, 5 ll-16c; powdered, granulated, 5 3-16c. No. 7, 6c. THE MONEY MARKET. New York, Oct. on call firm at 6 per cent; prime mercantile paper, per cent; sterling ex- change steady with actual business in bankers' bills at for demand and at for 60 days; posted rates, and commercial bills, silver certificates, bar silver, Mexican dollars, 47c. THE BOND MARKET. New York, Oct. bonds firm: U. S. 2s U. S. 3s registered XT. S. 3s coupon U. S. 4s registered IT. S. 4s coupon 130 U. S. 4s registered TT. S. 4s coupon TJ. S. 5s registered U. S. 5s coupon New York, Oct. prices of stocks showed gains overS aturday in a majority of cases, the higher- priced industrials leading. National Steel and Anaconda lost a point. Oth- erwise changes were fractional. The market was quite active in the open- ing dealings. Active bidding for a few of the higher-priced specialties soon diffused strength throughout the market. Purchases were heaviest in leather, Sugar and People's Gas, which advanced Improve- ments of a point or better occurred in numerous other specialties, with General Electric figuring for Republic Steel and Pullman were exceptions, yielding points re- spectively. Western railroads and some of the southern and southwest- ern group were taken freely at ad- vancing prices, Missouri Pacific, Louisville and Indiana preferred be- ing conspicuous. Toward 11, Sugar, American Tobacco and Brooklyn Transit were offered freely, the first mentioned losing a point. Reaction in the leading checked the rise all around and trad- ing became dull. While the stand- ard stocks eased off, there were nc losses of importance. New York, Chicago and St. Louis second pre- ferred advanced 4 and Third Avenue 9 points. Heavy buying of Green Bay in incomes advanced them Sales of stocks to noon, shares. The bond market generally ruled firm. The market fell backward on real- izing, but offerings fell off to such a small figure on the decline that the bulls were encouraged to renew the The Leather stocks, iagtr, Money to loan at 5 per cent. Inquire, Vesey Heaton, law office. ____________ 30tf Mothers be son ana use "Mrs. Window's Soothing Syrup" for your children while cutting teeth. It Is the best remedy of all. May MEN OF MARK. Clarence E. Ward of Dayton, 0., has painted 533 steeples. "Old Pietz" is the pot name by 'which General Jonbrrt is kuowu to his Trans- vaal soldiers. Leopold CniTerns of Philadelphia does not reud jokes, as lie dislocates his jaw every time he laughs. Wayne MnoYeugh's retainer in the case oC C'nutnin Oberlin Curler was nud his fee is likely to be several times as much more. The Chateau Muzeiias lias cost M. Lou bet a ftut which is taken to iiiilicHtc that the French president's pri- vate means are greater than was gener- ally supposed. IVtcr Dunne- told a Dublin reporter: "London is tin- second American city in the world. After a time the papers will be writitiR, 'An Uuglishuiau walked down Piccadilly today.'" Frank H. Cooper, the Chicago million- aire, has returned from a tour of Europe, dnrins which he visited his native city, Akkrun, in rrieM.iml, Holland. He there made for founding a home for the aged and infirm. Henry Scluick, who was senior assist- ant foreman of the New York tire depart- ment and who lias been in the service since ha-- IK-CH retired on account of physical divubility on half pay, a year, for life. He is 71 years old. The late Cornelius Vanderbilt was, above all tiling--, methodical. He would, every months, make u careful li-.t of important to be accomplished in the next hall jrar. hang it over his pri vate desk and check off the items day by day. Mr. Napoleon Trideon of Biddeford, Me., has been married three years and i n perplexed man. Ills family is iuu'eas- iiiK more rapidly than hii salary. His wife has just presented him with the third pair of twins. She was a twin, and so was he. Sir Thomas Liptoii employs nearly persons ill his packing houses and tea stores in Chicago, aud he has engaged a railway train of seven cars to bring a number of them to New York at the time of the race between the Columbia ami the Shamrock, his jacht. with which be hopes to win the America's cup. Count Koiitalbii. Portuguese dor to the court of Vicuna, discarded rail roads in proceeding Xioln Lisbon to hi' post and drove all the way in an old fash iolied state coach, drawn by four gayly Oiiparisolied with liveried footmei and outriders. It took him four months to make tlip journey. Kdmiind Ilmitlcdge, the publisher wlv died suddenly in London the other day very well knoAui in the thoatrica world, having been for many year" a fa miliaf figure all first night perform ances. He in his usual place when a new melodrama wai produced in the Adelphi theater n couple of weeks ago. He was an amateur actor of more than common ability. Willtam Vanderbilt, who has now become the head of the Vanderbilt family, will lie 50 years old in December. He is essentially a mitn of the world, has owned a racing stable, defended the America's cup. driven a eoacb four and cruised in almost every sea In own stenm yacht. The estimate of present fortune varies from to RIGHT WAY TO SWEEP TALES Thll Work to Get tke Beit To sweep a room in little. To get it ready for sweeping taken time. Each upholstered piece of furniture should be carefully brushed and plain wlished surfaces wiped with a slightly damp cloth, then rubbed with a dry one and either moved out of the room or covered with a dnst sheet. A paint brush does excellently to re- move the dnst that will lodge in carved Mrts, or if in the crevices a very tiny >r Btifter brash or a wooden skewer can M used. If there are moldings at the of the wall, use a long handled irnsh if it iaperfectly clean. If it isn't. ;ie a duster over it Do ceilings and walls in the came way. Don't open the windows till the ac- tual sweeping is finished, or the current of air will scatter the dirt over the room again. Sprinkle salt or tea leaves on the floor and work from the corners to the center of the room. The stroke should be long, the broom always on the floor pushing the dirt before it, not setting it in mo- tion by swinging it round. Carpets that are often taken np can be cleaned in the following way, which raises no dnst and leaves the carpet looking very bright and fresh. Get a bucket of lukewarm water, to which liquid ammonia in the proportion of a tablespoonfnl to two gallons has been added. Dip a clean house flannel in this, wring it as dry as you can and wipe the carpet with the grain. The dirt and dnst will collect in lumps be- fore yonr flannel. The cloth needs fre- quent rinsing, and the water must be changed as it gets dirty. After the room has been swept and any dust there may be has settled the woodwork shonld be wiped with a damp cloth, using a little whiting on the cloth For dirty places in the case of paint or turpentine on a dry cloth for varnished. Don't forget that the pictures need dusting. A careful housekeeper of my acquaintance insists on this attention being paid to the backs as well as to the fronts. See that everything is moved for dusting. Dusty rims rcnnd ornaments proclaim a careless housekeeper. The best plan is to have the first dnster slightly damp and finish off with a dry one. How to Make Tomato Mayonnalie. Select firm and good sized ripe, ice cold tomatoes. Cut a slice from the top and scoop out the seeds and soft pulp with a spoon, being very careful not to break the tomato. Shred cress very fine and mix with a small quantity of may- onnaise dressing. Fill the tomato with the mixture, put a teaspoonfnl of dress- ing on the top of each tomato and serve on crisp curly leaves of cress. How to Remove While the child lies on its mother's lap screaming place a thin cloth or handkerchief over the month and face. Place your own mouth to that of the child and give a sudden forcible puff. The effect of this is to expel, or at least to send forward, the contents of the nostrils. In this way a plnm stone has been blown clear out of the nose, and in other cases a button or other foreign body has been shifted so near to the ex- ternal nares as to render it easy of re moval and thns save a great deal of painful and difficult poking about in the recesses of the nostril. MONEY MAKING IN THE CENTRAL AMERICAN REPUBLIC. How to Make Indian Pnneakrs. One pint of Indian meal and one tea spoonful salt. Mix with enongh boiling water to make a little thinner than mush. When cold, add the yolks of four eggs, half a cup of flour sifted with three teaspoonfnls baking powder, enough sweet milk to uiako batter as for griddle cakes and the beaten whites of four eggs, added jnst before baking. Why Ko War Silver Balllon. Amttlen Local RerolBtloM. [Special Correspondence.] WILLIAMS, A. T., Oct. are frequent of another revolution in Honduras. Thin recalls a recent con- versation which took place in this town. TO a party of us Charles H. Gibson, ft. veil known milling expert, related hm experiences in that turbu- lent Central republic. "I have Just returned from Hon- said be, "haying left there on the 17th of last May. A peculiar proposition was made to a number of New York capitalists. A man, an Ainer- lean by birth, caine to the metropolis from Honduras with the news of a rich strike on his mining property in country, lie brought maps and dia- grams and samples of ore. lie declared he had one of the richest mines in the world and only needed capital to de- velop a bonanza. "The promoter's story seemed RO plausible and attractive that the fiuan- How to Cook They should be thrown into cold wa- ter as soon as they come from the mar- ket, allowing them to remain thero for an hotir. Parboil in salted water for 15 minntes and then throw again into ice water for five minutes. Now put in re- frigerator until ready to use. Always use a silver knife in cutting sweet- breads. When ready to cook, cut in slices, dip them in egg. then in bread crumbs, and fry in boiling fat. Serve with cream sauce. POULTRY POINTERS. Keep four ducks to one drake. Do not feed too mnch soft feed. Never use imperfect fowls for breeding. Get rid of the hens you do not intend to keep through the winter. It rarely pays to spend time trying to curt t bad case of roup or egg bound in Use the hatchet, Lefhorhs and Brahmts do not thrive well together. 80 far as cm be done hurt the flocks oftlfom. How to Care For the Chapped and rough lips are not only painful, but disfiguring, and it is ad- visable never to go into the open air without previously using a little glyc- erin or vaseline upon the month. To moisten the lips with the tongue has a drying effect upon the skin ultimately, and the habit is one to be rigorously avoided._______________ How to Make Tomato Marmalade. To two pounds of tomatoes and one pound of tart apples allow two and a half pounds of sugar and the juice and grated rind of one lemon. Scald the. tomatoes to remove skin and pare, core and slice the apples. Add sugar to to- matoes and apples and boil slowly one hour. Stir and skim when needed. Add juice and grated rind of another lemon and boil until the marmalade is smooth and thick. Put up in pint glass fruit cans._____________ How to Wanh an Rider Down Quilt. Pnt it in warm soapy water to which a little ammonia has been added Wring it out with the hands and repeat this process till clean. Then rinse all the soap out with two changes of water. Shake well and hang out to dry. When dry, shake the quilt frequently until it is as full looking and soft as when new How to Fireproof A wash compound composed of lime, salt and fine sand or wood ashes, put on as ordinary whitewash, renders a shin- gle roof flftyfold more safe against fall- ing sparks or cinders. This wash also helps as a preservative against the weather. V. Marion Crawford is now in Bicny mid ilocs not expect to return to America fur at least A year. Mrs. Frances Hodgson Burnett will eoon return to the United States. She is nt present liviug in England engaged in work. TRANSPORTATION' IX HOXDURAS. ciers were about to invest iti the enterprise. They sent for me and showed the papers and samples and asked for an opinion of the venture. In writing the scheme looked promis- ing, but 1 refused, of course, to make a report without a personal examina- tion. Then they decided to send me down to see the mine. So 1 went, and It was well 1 did. "In order to reach the mine we had to make a journey of over 150 miles Into the interior on muleback. The trip was rough. We came to a steep mountain which rose directly out of the plain to a height of over feet. We were compelled to follow the trail, and this took us over the mountain. In a number of places the path was so dangerous and narrow that I got off the mule's back and caught hold of his tail. Then I made the beast drag me along. The summit was reached in just three hours and five minutes. Aft- er a short rest we made the descent on the other side. H took us less time. ''When we reached our destination a very short inspection of the mine proved that it was utterly worthless. Had money been ad for ma- chinery and supplies not only would tisey never have been forwarded to the mine, but the Americans could not have recovered their belongings. By the way, there is only one other mine of any importance in Honduras. It is operated by American capital and is located far away from the Atlantic coast. It Is a silver proposition, and the ore is smeltcred near the mine. The molten metal is formed into bars containing ounces. These bars are carried by the natives to the coast. None of this bullion has been stolen. Should a workman try to dis- pose of a bar of silver the theft would be at once suspected and an arrest would immediately follow. "On the trip iv ate deer. morn- ing one of the men in tlie party would go out with his ritle. and he never fail- ed in :i short time to bring in an ani- mal. When we had consumed all of the fresh meat that we needed we had the remainder jerked. That is, the meat was cut into thin and salt- ed. As the air dry the meat never spoiled. "I saw but two snakes in Honduras. The reason is that at the end of the dry season all the vegetation and un- derbrush is burned. Then, too. they have a bird which they call the snake hawk and which travels around in pairs. When a snake is spied on the ground the male bird will descend sud- denly: and. grabbing the reptile, will fly uj) In the air and then let it fall. The female bird is ready on the instant the snake reaches the earth and at once she gives it another excursion. Then the snake is given a second drop, whereupon the male bird takes it on its third sky journey and gives it the final drop. The snake is then dead and Mr. and Mrs. Snake Hawk go off and enjoy a pleasant meal. "While on the trip we had many in- teresting experiences, and I had a good opportunity to observe the country, and I was not favorably impressed with it. t should not advise any one with small capital to go there. Bana- nas and coffee are the most important products. The export of cattle on a large scale should pay good profits. "A mau named Ballantine Is at the present time engaged In doing this thing. While I was there he sent a shipload of cattle to Cuba. He paid a bead In silver money and sold his entire cargo for about a head in gold. All the expenses of the transac- tion had first to be paid, and the ship- per stood any loss by deaths in the herd. He must have made a clear per head on ench nnitnal. "There is an American syndicate which is largely interested in the de- velopment of Honduras. Among the members of It are Chauncey M. De- pew and Colonel John Jacob Astor. One thing they hope to accomplish Is the completion of the present railroad. They propose to extend the line to the Pacific ocean. An English company has some sort of lien on the property, and until they can be induced to sur- render their claim very little can be ac- compllslied in this direction. "The fruit steamers come down ev- ery Tuesday and load the following day. The entire fruit Industry Is in the or rue wneiaer Banana conptny, and the manager of the business a mau uamed Kleth. He is a former king of Costa Ulca and sold out In- terests to the banana trust for UOO. While we were down there the Atlas line steamer Adirondack took away lli.ouo bunches of bananas from the plantations once owned by ex-King Kleth. "Honduras has quite a number of American residents. Five hundred of our troops could capture the country any tiuie. Colonel Cooper, a native of the 1 uited. States, is the manager of the rullioad and is the local represent- ative Astor's American syndicate. "Tin- country is full of troublesome rod 1 went in bathing In one of the rivers and after coming out found one of my swelled and very pain- ful. 1 did not know what the cause was until oar of ilio natives took out u knife and cut a Miiall piece of flesh-off and examined it under a glass. For two day> 1 did uot move. Some one suggested the use of coal oil, so 1 cov- ered the sores itli it and soon recover- ed. "1 lif.-ml an interesting story of the prominent part winch an American named Christmas took in one of the most recent of the numerous revolu- tions in Honduras. This man is a loco- uiotiu- engineer ami receives a day. One morning he attending to his duties a party of rebels entered the port on an improvised gunboat. At the new- of tliis the regular train loaded with government troops .started out of tin-1 ity. The rebels cap- tured the place aud at once demand- ed that Christmas engage in the serv- ice of the new regime. At Brst he re- fused to obey, but the rebels Insisted, so he concluded to join the new rulers. "There happened to be another en- gine and some freight cars in the city. On one of the flat oars they placed a lot of irou and formed a kind of stock- ade. Behind this Christmas, two com- panions and a lot of guns aud ammuni- tion were placed. Then the other cars were tilled with rebel troops and the train started. The idea was to catch up with the regular government train and capture it and its soldiers. I'retty soon they caught up. and a running tight ensued. Over of the regular troops were killed, and the result was that Christmas was compelled to leave the country. "The president of Honduras bad of- fered a reward for Christmas dead or alive, but as soon as the trouble was over Christmas went back to that coun- try. He called upon the commander of the local garrison and informed him that the purpose of returning was peaceful. It was ft bold thing to do, aud the officer was startled. Christinas was ordered not to leave the city, and the president was communicated with. That personage sent word that Christmas could have temporary free- dom. Three months later the intrepid American was sent for by the chief magistrate. The result of the confer- ence was an otter to Christmas of a generalship in the regular army. This he refused to accept, as a steady job at per day was more attractive than that of a precarious military office. "Among the most prominent mer- chants of Honduras are the Pear broth crs. There are three of thorn now, al though until quite recently there were four. These men were ouce Ameri- can citizens, nml as they prospered in the laud of their adoption they sent for a younger brother. He happened to reach Honduras while one of the fre- quent revolutions was in progress. He neither the language nor the manners and customs of the peo- ple. "A military order was issued by the regular army otlicials that no citizen should approach within 'M paces of a sentinel. Young Pear .started one inoru- HOMIUKAS ing to walk from his home to his office, wiiich was just opposite. He looked up and saw a soldier. ho nt once or- dered him to do somethiug. Young Pear did not comprehend the meaning of the command, so he stood still and threw up his hands. The sentinel spoke. again and recehed no answer. Then the third time he repeated the words and leveled his gun aud shot at tin.- trembling American. Death soon fol- lowed. "An investigation was demanded by angry relatives. It was clearly proved that the distance between the soldier and young Pear was at least 80 paws. The verdict was that a cold blooded murder had been committed. Our min- ister to Honduras looked after the in- terests of the Pears. An indemnity of was asked from the govern- ment of Honduras. Whether this has been paid I am not certain. I know, however, that the president has issued orders that in the future the lives and property of Americans shall be re- spected. Furthermore the governors of the different states are to be held per- sonally responsible for any Insult to our flag." WILLIAM R. BHITTON. lit Wmthlng don't scrub it and wear off the sur- face. Use Gold Dust Washing Powder according to direc- tions printed on every package and you will be pleased with the results and surprised at the saving in labor. StM for booklet-" Qotdu Sxlw tor Homework THE N. K. FAIRBANK COMPANY Chkip St.lMlt NtwYwk GRAND ARMY CHIEF. Career or Ihr- F.lrrtrd lu War anil I'vave. Colonel Alliert Dunne Shaw, the new- ly elected I'ouiuiaiNlcr in chief of the Giund Army of the Republic, boru In Lymc, Jeffeixm cuiiuty, N. Y., on L'7, 1M1. lie was n student at the ille I'ninn aca-leiny when the civil war broken out. Though not yet years old. he at once enlisted in the Thlrty-flfWi New Yoik He. took part in the battles of HHppahau- nock Station, Hull Kim, Chantilly, South Mountain. AiHietam, Fredericks- burg aud a number of smaller engage- ments. After serving two as a private and noncommissioned officer and inak- ,.in lie- .it in ward stuQiea me- :it St Mary's seminary, Balti- io f .-mi! in I8NS wan ordained to the it.i Gibbous. Dur-, MIT tui.r of parish work he ar-' leiul.i a haplaincy In the combined Influence it r.Hum-il Archbishop li-ltirl vc'iied him the appointment. I'.efore lieiu-j assigned to iH'wey'B flax- slap on July last year, he served on the Portsmouth, Charleston. P.alMmore and Father Keniicv has such a tempera- ment sis one niislit expect lu 8 lover of the manly, fearless, Hf fectioii.ito. He is a stout patriot and a great favorite with the and of- ficers of Dewey's ship. A jl COLONEL ALBKP.T D. SHAW, Ing a fine record as n faithful and gal- lant soldier he was appointed a special agent of the war department In the office of the provost marshal at Water- town, N. Y. There he remained until the close of the war, engaged lu the work of raising troops. The war Colonel Shaw entered St. Lawrence university, from which he was graduated In 3807. He served as n member of the state assembly from Jefferson county Iti 18G7. Colonel Shaw served as United Stntes consul at Toronto for ten years and was then promoted to be consul at Manchester. England, where he re uiaiued until 1880. On his return from England Colonel Shaw took up his residence at Water town, where he has since lived. For several years he has been largely In- terested In the development of electric power at Niagara Falls. Since he has been president of the Canadian Xiaijani rower company, which has a hundred year of the water power the Queen Victoria park. Ever since 1880 Colonel Shaw has been n prominent member of the Grand Army of the Kopubllc nnd has always been an earnest advocate of liberal pensions for Colonel Alcantara Learned tlie Art of War at West Point. One of the military lead- ers involved, in the lively V e n e v. u elan revolution is ________________a West Point 0 graduate. This is Colonel Francisco Alcantara. He is nt the bond of the government's artillery regiment. His father was at one time president of Venezuela. Colo-, iiel I'raiu-isco was giveu n special course ;it the ('lilted States Military Hcadein.v nt the request of the Veue- ziiolnti government. He was gradu- ated two years ngo, nud his American military training is thus beins put use cuily In his career. The cause of the revolution against I'resideiit Ignacin Andrndu Is a fla- violation of the constitution. He nresetiteil ineaPHfc about si i mouths igii provided for the division D'.' several sink's, t'udw the cons siu-li divisions can aft'T the piT.Jtlrut in at the tinju of tV luiriirtiirrtou of 
                            

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