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Fort Wayne News Newspaper Archive: May 07, 1898 - Page 15

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Publication: Fort Wayne News

Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana

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   Fort Wayne News, The (Newspaper) - May 7, 1898, Fort Wayne, Indiana                               DRIVING THE LATEST FAD OF THE FAIR SEX. New among the amusements of the smart set at this time of year is driving or riding. Tho tiross-ctmairy runs some time ago, and ULO hunting colony has Kono iu for tte favorite sport with the usual enthusiasm, but there are Bill! a lot of fashionable folk in town, so thorn must noala be riding and driving going on here Lu the city. Horectook exercise seems to have re- itre tho turnouts that aro to bo seen i at the correct hour, and quite correct they are in every appointment. One horse in the road wagon, u runabout, with tho newest of harness, evorythinc hi apfcfc and span order, from tho dashboard to the whip, and the girl driving the trap In such irreproach- able tailur-made gowns. It is in bad taste to wear a sown at all elaborate. A plain cheviot skirt, with covert cloth. known an institution be classed with tho now fashions, liut thia sea- son it has been nioro elaborately got- FOREIGN RIDERS WILL COMPETE. The champion wheelmen of all .coun- tries are now in th e United States. The latest arrivals arc Rene Oavelloy. Leon Uanlay and Paul Baurotle. fiau- rotte is the middle-distance champion of France and has cunio over in the hope of getting a match with Jimmy Michael. Ills two companions are fast men also and hope to get on matches. They will be heard from at an early date in races on the tracks of the dif- ferent cycle associations and perhaps on the national circuit tracks. LonifrtHd Revolver club will abort at Its boora M AMATEUR ATMLETE5. Athletes are discussing a proposition! io re-organize the Amateur Athletic! Union on lines similar to those em- ployed successfully by the League of; American Wheelmen. The idea has; much to commend it, but chances will! bo given to every ono interested to make EUggestionft. The registration rule is decidedly unpopular with every one except the athletes registered. Very few complaints have been heard from the field and track athletes, who realize that the registration syatem protects them in many ways and is a RENE FAUL BOURQTTE LEON BOULAY chived a impetus thia season, and there aro many mffre equestrians to bo seen eroiy afternoon than there wore a year ago. The riding academies nave been well patronized, and it has been Aeemol necessary for all tho young girls to be carefully Instructed UH to how they shall hold the reins, Hit tlwlr horse, etc., and one of the prettiest sights in Central Park Is when a class of these young girls is taken for the afternoon ride. One or Instructors are all that are needed for olght nr ten girls, but these Instructors have their hands full keep- ing the class In order. One girl will Insist upon dashing ahead, in a mad gallop, just when the others have de- clared themselves too tired for any- tttlnc but a walk. Smart and absolutely satisfactory REVISING BOXTNG RULES, Charllo "White, in his attempts at re- vising tac boxing rules which bear the name of Queensbury at present, has en ormtered many difficulties. Perhaps heavy Kluve.s am! ilio trimmest and smartest, of, headgear suffices. This same style of trap is, of course, used In tin; summer in the country, and only appears in the city in the spring; it not an uxpmmive turnout, and IH one thai, in particularly useful. The .spider phaetons arc also io he Keen in the morning aud women drive the pair of liorscH necessary, hut. Itierp is always a coac-linnm perched in the small seat. Hie back. The style or dross Tin- the phaelrn is much more elaborate limn HUM WM-II i in the mad wagon. .Much and) trimmed costumes with yay and nig hats are t.lio rule. Tin; wo-! nuin wliii drivps may pwhancp wt-ar a jacket instead of ;i wrap :i with a veil. brougham in loo the most sr-rinus is Mm I. known as weight question. The generally recog- nized weights are. bantam, feather, light, welter, middle and heavyweights but. six divisions are not enough, tho lighten; say. They want a different class For every pound, begin n at leu tip than over. it OIK- uf t.he inosl. expensive trails, for it wills for ouch in every detail ami must, always be. in perfect, order. Twu limn, or a man and boy, must bo on the and Mm liveries no small Item; hut then il is one of the signs of wealt.lt. ant! so every fanhiunable wo- man owns her brougham iiurt finds op- portunity to exorcise her own taste in the fnrnisliiue or it. Driving Tour-in-hi-ml for women is now one of the accomplish- ments necessary. AH yet. nuly a few women have mailed a. rnnch. but Mtc time is not fur off when woman's coaching will he in existence. Al- together, (lie coniinp woman is to lie a aud tmding ;it. 170. Under the new rules there will be n job lot of weights to suit, those who prefer fractional parts of the pound, for it is quite cer- tain that no new rules could add to the confusion which prevails al. (his time. Barry, Sullivan, Kelly and SCENES AT THE N. Y. A. C. WRESTLING MATCHES others are not bantainwciRhts, anil ac- cording to tho rules of the game, as they have always been interpreted by reliable followers of tho sport, they become feather whoa cuaso to be bantam weights. guarantee in Itself that, in open meeln they will run no chances of coinpetlnK againKt. professionals. Rush, the Princeton sprinter, talk- ing about the outlook in Held and track athletics, mud ye.stcnlay: "Von, I am KOlng to try to beat Wafers. It's no easy task, is it'! No, 1 don't (latter myself that I can Imat him, nor am I muking any boasts about my speed. 1 am simply to try. Princeton will do her best with comparatively few men. I'ennsylv.-inm will be si rung, ami ,it Harvard they have at hist Hottlp.il clnwn to methods, which ought to prodiico a winning team, for they have the material at Cambridge." Advices from Detroit say that it io pretty definitely understood that Kecne Fifzpatrick will be engaged hy the. Detroit AlhlcMe Club as trainer during the summer months. It ap- pears 1 hal there Is plenty or athletic material in tho Detroit club which on- ly needs coaching to gain recognition in tho amateur athletic world. Jt is but a few yearn ago that, this club ranked an one of the first in the coun- try. It was represented on tho track hy a fine string of athletes, including John Owens, Jr., Harry .le.wett and others almost equally good. Detroit's athletic club also had a baseball nine that was the pride of the city. "Pour or live years says a Detroit Ath- letic Club member, "when our club was occupying a position of promi- nence in track antl field athletics in the country, other places in the West, out- side of St. Louis, Cleveland and Chi- cago, paid little, attention to this form of sport. In Chicago until a few yearn ago a Hreat many people had no defi- nite, idea of what :i real field day was like. Since that time Chirago has grown to be the center of athletics in the West, and shares with Nmv York the athletic honors of the country.. The wonderful growth of field sports j among tho Western colleens, small and great, has largely developed public in- terest as well as the riant, sort of ath- letic material. Tho name growth has been felt at Ann Arbor. Detroit, stim- ulating a revival of field sports, was the pioneer in this line in the West." THE MEET. for the track for the national meet have been presented to tho club. The specifica- tions provide for a wooii track, four laps to the mile, banked ten feet nn tho turns and five feet on the The proposed will hold several thnuniind people and (bo bleaclierk's, which will extend all around tho track, will aerniumo- ilato ten people. The club proposes to open a National competi- tion for a name for the park in which tho track will bo located, and to offer aa a prize for the successful competitor f. ticket to all races on the track during the season of 3 SOS, including tho races of the National meot. In the opinion of the Meet club, war with Spain will have no effect on the meet, and it is not being considered In the The Mwrt club is re- ceiving the encouragement and finan- cial aid of tlie business men and wheel- men and sees no cloud in the prospect for an entirely successful meet In Aug- ust. CYCLER, There are some aged cyclists living in this country, but none is as old as England's oldest. This man is more than 90 years of age, and tt IB said oE him that ho built the first bicycle "driven within Itself instead of by kicking against the ground" (as the hobbyhorse was Ills name is Adam Sludo and ho lives In Twick- enham. When a boy he rode a hobby- horse. Concerning tho first bicycle, Mr. Slade recently wrote to the Cyclist as follows: "Sixty years ago I made a tricycle for a by namo carry his paclt. It was made with lancewootl wheels, ash frame, and pedal levers made to his own plan. He could ride H, but not carry his pack. An account of it came out In the Strand Magazine, with the name of Macmillan about four years ago. I saw it at the Stanley show with some others several years ago, and it is still in existence Mr. Slade still enjoys the delights of cycling, as an excerpt from his letter will show. Here it is: "Two and a half years ago Lin ley and Biggs made me a. bicycle which learned to ride, ami am still riding every day. stimmur I took it to Eastbourne, A friend of mine, fifteen years ynnngor '.han myself, rode his tricycle with me to and had to puff and blow very hard to keep pace with ray bike. I once hnri an omnicycle, kept It for two years, and sold it for and never got the money." FOR A BIG TRACK. A prize of has been offered by tho Chicago Athletic Association for the best design of an athletic fleld, 300x500 feet, including a. football field, board cycle track, cinder path, grand stands, and other fixtures necessary for a firKt-cInKs field. The Keating ca- pacity of the grand stands is to bo and the club wanta to have the cinder path outside tho football field, ami the cycle, track its the extreme out- er circle. A REVOLVER MATCH, An interesting revolver match by telegraph will be shot on Tuesday ev- ening, Uoy 2'i, by the Brooklyn aort the result will he telegraphed fcj spec- ial wiro at the galleries. ThB triTes of tho match provide for any revolver from 32 to 42 calibre, with atrictly opnn sights. The distancs wffl bb 10, 15 aud 20 yards; at thn 10 and 2B jards distances tho standard American lur- RUL will be used, and at the IS yanlfi distance a four-Inch buH'a-eyo, with tho first four rings one Inch apart antl thu others ono aud a half Inches apart, 20 seconds time for each fire shots; In tho 10 aud 20 yards one mlnuto io each bliot will bo ailcwaij, The iettrnm wiH ho composed of sU ineu each. HAMBURG'S Marcus Daly, who paid John. B, Mad- den a big sum a few months ago for Hamburg, the crack uvo-year-oH of last season, is now the owner of a colt only u few days old, a full brother to his groat racer. He hougliJi Lady Reel, the darn of Hamburg, from Capt. Sam Bruwn for not long ago, and as she was in fual at the time to Hanover, Hamburg's sire, he deter- mined that foal should ho born tm his farm. Ed. A. Tipton, Mr. DaJy'a agent, was agreeable surprised (11 Lexington, Ky., iast week to leam that the new comer was a bay coll wtth. a wbity star. AMONG THE OARSMEH. "Many rowing lays an Englishman, "have discarded old methods In favor ot tho bicycle while in pursuit of their business. Tho first coach to adopt the bicycle to his business was the well-known Fletcher, who this year for tho first time trained the Cambridge crew. He used It whlla training the Dark Blue crew at Bcrarno End In 1804. Of course, some amusing incidents have whon coaches have, becoming forgotten that they were riding on tho river bank. A funny story is told of a captain o( the Thamca Rowing Club who coachea hla men from a blrvcle. "Eyes In UIH he shouted excitedly to his crew, some of wham were no doubt watching their strokes.' "Eyes in thn and tho next moment he might have added, had ho had timo to think of It, Ts in tho for be had ridden clean over the bank into tlia river up to his neck." THE CHAMPION HURDLER A. C. Krafmglein, champion hurdler and nli-round athlete, will be one of the principal romnetltors at the Na- tional Amateur meet in liergen Point, Tlis record last year showed that ha had In him material to make him a At successor to Jordan, whoso dealt was so' recently announced. China possesses the richest coal mlnca in the world.   

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