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Fort Wayne Journal Gazette: Friday, August 9, 1901 - Page 1

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   Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, The (Newspaper) - August 9, 1901, Fort Wayne, Indiana                               THE FOM WAYNE JOURNAL-GAZETTE. ESTABLISHED FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 9; 1901. PRICE FIVE CENTS. OPPOSING FORCES IN GREAT STRIKE MOV- ING FOR ADVANTAGE. Gompers, of the American Federation, Was in Conference With Bloodshed of the Strike Recorded. P1TTSBURG. Pa.. Aug. contending sides in the steel strike are centering their energies for a show of strength on the day that the general strike order becomes effec- tive. The United States Steel corpo- ration in re-opening mills closed by the first strike call to show its in- dependence of unionism and gathering strength wherever it may to lighten the effect of the general strike or- der and the Amalgamated associa- tion bends its energies to the exten- sion of its membership and to ob- tain the support ot co-operation of the American Federation of Labor. The general strike order becomes ef- fective on Saturday night and the claims put forth on oltbur side as to the results that ,wlll accrue from It are widely at variance- Officials of the steel company admit that thousands of men will obey the or- der of President Shaffer, of the Amal- gamated association, and go out but they positively deny tbtat the tie-up will bn they point to their success in re-opening four mills that wore and say that they have strong holds at points where the Amalgamated .claims the greatest strength. The stevl offlclalf. nro in- clined to minimise the sympathetic nssliitalice which the Amalgamated will got. Onu official the mutter Dili- way: "What can the mnclilnUtH do? Have they not just been And the iDlno workvre. Did they nld the fire- President Shaffer and his assis- on the other ulde Insifct thul Uu> strike order will: be'generally obeyed and that they will obtain more than enough support to cripple the steel corporation. "We tbone people to a stiutdsllll wan the wuy that. Vice-President elect OIlMon, of t'lttsburg. voiced tho feelings of AmalgnmHted people. With both sides arming for the conflict and a gennritl strike but hours away, many ordinarily well- informed tivrftoni hold the them will yvt be a settlement of tins strike. Voryl t'rrnton cttrtio flC-re yesterday and presence started Ihu rumor to-itay that he wits hero for anolhur conference in behalf of tho stool cor- poration. Mr. Fronton dunlttd this and during tho day made no effort to see any ot the strike lenders. Some of tho men who predict, settlement Iwlleve thero will be outside Interven- tion from powerful and' a submission of the dispute to arbitra- tion. Men of national reputation, in- cluding Archbishop Ireland and Sen- ators Hannu, and Scott, have been named in this connnection but if ef- fort is being put forth in that di- rection it is being done without knowledge ot the public. President Shaffer devoted to-day to a conference with President Gomp- ers of the American Federation of Labor, who came here for a personal study of the situation before com- mitting himself or bis immense or- ganization in any manner. Tbe con- ference reached no conclusion and unless there is an alteration of plans will be resumed 10 o'clock to-mor- row morning. President Oompers came here In company with Frank Morrison, secretary of the Federation and was met at Amalgamated head- quarters by President Shaffer. Secre- tary Williams. Assistant Sccrotnry Tlghc. Vice-Presidents and Chap- pell, National Trustee John Pierce and Ben I. Davis. President Ooinp- CTB declined to state tho result of their (MIlH-'fittlons and would say nothing. President Blinder also de- clined to talk. The.strikers believe will iwcurc, the active co-opcm- llon of tho fafl'.'rntlon. Tho steel corporation succeeded to-day In get- ting Hi'- Farm mill at tin; Lindsay McCutchvnti plant and another mill at the Clark works started. They received reports dial, at Park night of tin; mills did per- fect work and nn ram'? from WellsvllK' that tlir fctriko was virtually over met with no opposition at, any of the four where hftve re-opened wills. Tile striken that there aro not chough wen >it the Lindsay and MrCutcheon oitaiillnb- incnt. (11 operhtn tin; on? mill ntnrturt atid predicted that It would clone during the day. It was kept going until night. It IK planned t.oon to optin another mill nt Mudsny ft McCiiUtlioon plant mid iti.til tho Pointer mill nut) tlm plant at Carnegie. The steel corporation Is evidently putting forth Its groatcHt at I'llUhurg. I In' of the strike, for the moral effect President Shiiftvr. when tho report of starting of tin- Undttly ftlcCiitchcnn plant of the American Steel Hoop company, said: "There la nothing in It. I have a report 'from Vice-president ClibsOn In- (Oonllnued on Page Four.) A BIG CORPORATION. Fort Wayne People Incorporate a Mexican Land and Rubber Company With a Capital of INDIANAPOLIS. Aug. 8. The Mexican Plantation company, of Fort Wayne, capital stock was In- corporated here to-day. The West Baden Springs company, with 000 capital stock, was incoiporated to- day. It will rebuild the West Baden hotel, destroyed by fire some months ago. The directors arc T-.ee W. Sin- clair. Miss Lillian Sinclair. James F. Persise and Mrs. Araminta L. Per- sise. Mr. Sinclair was the principal owner of the original West Baden hotel. Other new incorporations are the Lake City Water company, of Ham- mond, capital stock In- diana state bank, of North Man- chester, capital stock FORT WAYNE PROMOTERS. The local promoters ot the Mexi- can Improvement company an.-: H. E. Sprague. president. J. H. Orr. secretary arid treasurer. Mayor Berghoff, Ex-Treasurer L. C. Hunter and some fifty other gentle- men are stockholders in the corpora- tion. Its property consists of 600 wres ot land in southern Mexico, the heart of the rubber district and it is their purpose to promote that industry. "We have." said Mr, Orr. "our land already under cultivation, and are propagating rubber trees in orchards or divisions, and Mr. Spraguc and my- self and perhaps others will visit the plantation this winter. The land is now occupied by our agents and is the best producing soil iu A FORTUNE OF AWAITS A LUCKY SWEDE. NEW VOttK. Aug. fortune of now in the United States treasury awaits a young Pole, named Dwnbitzky. provided he can trace'his rulationship to Duron Ludwig on Ovrobltzky. who fought In lire union army and died on tho battle- Bold during the civil war. An attor- ney of this city has been retained by the young man who Is now living In The attorney who Him been In communication with Secretary j Gage said that thij records of the gov- trntnotil'H Indebtedness to the original Dombltzky has been found. Bnron according. to story furnished to Several of tho hero, left Poland in 1503 because of political troubles and came to country. bud J 100.000 In American money, iho proceeds of thy sale of his esintes. This lie de- posited with the federal government at Washington and went into the army. He was. killed In the buttle of Tbe Wilderness. In (807 his grand-nephew in Rus- sia received a communication of Joseph consul of the United at Warsaw, Uussla. Informing him of the monoy left by tho old sul- dicr in tho government's care and asked for proofs'ot relationship. sum. with compound Interest, now to Conslderfthto dimctilty was encoun- tered in establishing the relationship becatine of records' In churches and voflri houses In Poland destroyed by fire by Kumlun troops. Not inter than a month ago a containing family tree wan found which. It IN nnld. Hi'' (be neplmw. BATTLESHIP WISCONSIN ORDERED IN READINESS TO PROCEED TO PANAMA. LUTHERAN SYNOD DISCUSSES SOCIALISM. The Rev. Katt, of Terre Haute, Delivers a Scholarly Argument Against It. Thursday's session oC the Lutheran synod meeting at St. Paul's church opened with a prayer service, followed by hymns by 'the congregation. There a full attendance of delegates. The chief feature of the day's pro- gram was the paper read by the Rev. Katt. of Torre Haute, on the subject of This paper dealt at length on the question and was alto- gether a comprehensive and scholarly definition of socialism as it exists. In the course of his address the Rev. Katt said: "Socialism is essentially commun- ism. Socialists all have this in com- mon, that they are all opposed to the individual ownership of property. It their ideas of revolutionizing affairs were carried out we would have a new state and the classes worth! be ar- rayed against each other. The danger of socialism liqs not so much therein that they seek to ulloviale the suffer-' ings of two poor labor but in this, that they tell him to abolish' and destroy the present order of things. They ad- vocate little work and few hours of work; more games and more amuse- ments. Yet reason tells us that labor is necessary, yea, almost a condition of life. Socialism carried out in prac- tice would not only destroy labor but also reveionee and regard for the scriptures and the government." The second paint of tho Rev. Knit's argument was t.o show that the doe- trlno of socialism could not be carried out Men are not equal but, unequal, therefore there is no greater difficulty than that ol making .unequal things equal. This might do if all men were exemplary Christians but they would needs be exemplary without passions or human nature. So- cialists claim to be better Christians than most orthodox believers. They appeal to the Bible. Yet thei question with them i snot whether their posi- tion be just or right but whether it is profitable. They call Jesus a great socialist and claim that the first ehurch in Jerusalem was a commrin- istic society, but on looking closer we find these statements to be a great perversion of facts. When Christ speaks ot the poor He does not mean those j poor in worldly goods, but those spirit- ually poor. For His gospel is for all creatures. Socialists say "Thine is mine." Christ says "Mine is thine." The afternoon session was taken up with'a report from the Rev. H. Wesoloh, of Cleveland, a member of tho mission commission of tho Mis- souri synod for the middle west. In i general the report showed that the I progress of-the mission work in this j field, including the states of Indiana, Ohio and a part of Kentucky, was en- jcouraglng. It was decided to drop j New Albany from the list ot stations, these being considered an unsatisfac- tory point to work from. Tho sum ot appropriated to carry on I this work the coming year. Last regular church services were held and to-day the subject of "Labor and Trades Unions" will be discussed. Tho meeting of the synod will last until next Tuesday and much import- ant work is yet to be done. WASHINGTON. before lilts navy (teitfti-littont rlosed to-tlity mi (tent to Oeofge C. of the ttttilftthlji w' NOW ot AmicortcB, nenr tluj Soiniil naval ntiulon. to yrocooil to 8mi Prnncltto. from which point Hi" will bo ilUpaiehod to r'ntw- mn. In caw tho ktnlo dopartmont re- tliioiHM tho prt'Hcneo of n wnralilp on the I'ltcliic Hldo of the isthmus; This Action taken sifter Acting Secre- tary MacKctt rueelvod from tile department a communication from Mr. .1. Edwanl SlmmoiiH. of New York, prettldont of the Panama railway pany, sotting forth the of tho Bltuutlon on the lalhtniin or HIIK- gostlng that the warship be sent both to tho Atlantic' and the Pacific, sides. The acting secretary of state replied to Mr. Simmons that the gunboat Machias hnd been ordered to Colon, on the Atlantic side, but It was. the view of ofllci.ils during the early part of tho ddy, both at the state and navy departments that there was no present necessity for Sending a ship to the Psclilc Hide, for thia rouson Mr. no njqiieut. for nnotHcir Khlp. but 08 A matter of information he trntuunltlDil the of Mr. Slm- to (lie nrtltig head of mtvy department. in view of Mr. Simmons' letter, whleli conMrtMd to he ft for the' protection of American Intel- It WUB ilcemod to have the battleship Wisconsin nt San, Fran. (Isco, where she ciin proceed without delay to the Isthmus in cane she Is needed. Tho Wisconsin is one of the finest ships of the new imvy, and If she should be sent, tlita will be practically her Itrat active duty, as she lias been In commission only a short time. She hns a displacement of tons, is heavily armored and has a main bat- tery Of four 13-Inch breech-loading rifles and fourteen 6-lnch guns, which with her second battery, makes her one of the most formidable ships afloat. Her complement is about SOO ofn.ccrs and men, including about 75 marines. WORTH OF DIAMONDS RESTORED TO AN ANDERSON MAN THROUGH THE CONFESSIONAL ST. JOSEPH, Mich., Aug. confessional has been the means of saving worth of jewels to an Anderson, Ind., firm of jewelers. Wil- liam Washburn, president of the jewelry company, came here to-day from Chicago, bringing with him the tray of jewels returned to him by a Catholic priest who had received them from the penitent thief. The thief and his whereabouts are known, but Mr. Washburn thinks the man' fully penitent and will not prosecute him. On July S last tho jewelry house of William Washburn Co., of An- derson. Ind.. was entered by burglars in the night and a. trap of expensive diamonds was taken, along with other plunder. There were absolutely no clows. The police of Anderson, worked falthfuly on the ease but could not gain tlic slightest inkling as to the burglars. They worked on the case j the message came from Chicago I solving the problem. rewards were offered hut Ihoy brought forth no results. TtiCfidriy evening Mr. WnHh- biirn received a strangely worded cpistlo from a Chicago priest, Father j A. Murphy, paslor of St. Mary's church,   tho In There fKlnt when the time wan Mr. iCtii-htun to the OHIO LOAN ASSO- CIATION IN TROUBLE n.. Augr, s -A the V'lolti ttentor from .iftyR iliHl K. J. Mauck. ln- tif iniliMhiir ;ind loan tlunti. hurt ihiit thr- nrtUTtH (hi? Gunrrttt- "My horm did the Deist If eoitM un- ilor rlrcumfcttiMCM. nltlivUfh the lime nrcniB slow. wag I recced Oifcn he hax bpcti after ntiy mite In- thlx "Neither th'; Uai'k nor the weather tvnis favomtale to recora-breaHluif The former wan soft nud 1 obliged t.ti idlse the fecona po- xltlon all 'the way, the pole being tw badly eut up (o follow. "Ths ftlr wan fit prentlitgly muggy attd lacking In thOBi! Wmlitk'S OC drynett iiili] heat tlmt are etMtmlltU to ftint trotting. "THe time IS 111 (M> A reltetitlon my hoMpV condition t think he will hi> At lilrt l.ujst when It" The Abbott nt iti-txhioh tteach next Thuvn- y." THE BUFFALO heat of which was won on Wr entrant Silver, a Buftjilo honw. also ;i good content. In the drat Mit to-day nnd the second of the rtM, Cornelia ivlle the nccoiid choice In UM pooling Onward Silver ran 1IU team from quarter to the ter ling. Swinging Into the stiver went Into the At tbe time SUter Alice came up with Cornell.; Jtelle winning, by only Mlt length. The UutMlo hone third heat by half it length apparent effort, never whip, while Belle out. The latter won fourth Ml (Jnn'-ird Silver, the tilth Mid bent in a whipping flnlnh. Dun 1'stch hi. AeM ill IM pace. After winning the IM anil getting M the tternlce, brown mwt by IV. K. (Smith, of a, tliiwn In the third mile to cjumo why it Mot or thi rtrt In Ohio, Tlir tlttOM UiiU CrtMpMtiy lioiH-Inuwly JttHoUviit, UHI! i( now IH uit'l Tor Home tlino f'lWt htln irtdnuged in .'tit uhhurtihcMMllUt? rmintift4 ftiid liinl all authority into the tuindrt of A, ot the com- pany. iK-UHon fnrlhcr dlttfe that the fratichtan of the company taken mvay and Hint. Its affairs be wound up In "as speedy man JIH 
                            

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