Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, April 22, 1901

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

April 22, 1901

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Issue date: Monday, April 22, 1901

Pages available: 8

Previous edition: Sunday, April 21, 1901

Next edition: Tuesday, April 23, 1901

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Publication name: Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana

Pages available: 158,389

Years available: 1899 - 1922

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All text in the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette April 22, 1901, Page 1.

Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, The (Newspaper) - April 22, 1901, Fort Wayne, Indiana THE PORT WAYNE JOURNAL-GrAZETTE. i MONDAY MORNING, APRIL 22, 1901. PRICE FIVE CENTS. A DAY OF ALARM THROUGHOUT THE OHIO VALLEY. The River Palling at Pittsburg, But Rising to the Danger Line in Southern Ohio. Storm Mas Cost the Pittsburg District and the Story of Destruction Cannot be Had in the Other States Until Communica- tion is Fruit Crop Ruined and Other Crops Damaged. THuBATENED. RESERVOIR MAY BREAK AND FLOOD WINSTED, CONN. Floods Weaken the Banks and a Break Would Cost Many People Ready to Fly to the Hint! O., Reservoir in Dan- gerous ''Condition. WIFE TELEGRAPHS THAT 81 IS DEAD. i -__________ i i j MESSAGE BRINGS GARRETT MAN FROM MONTANA TO CHICAGO. GRAPHIC WORD PICTURE OF THE WORST SPRING STORM ON RECORD. WINSTED. Conn.. April safety oC this town and the lives ot many inhabitants arc seriously threat- ened to-night by the condition of High- land lake, which is now so swollen by the recent rains that overflow is imminent. Notices have been issued to the dwellers along four streets to take to the hills as soon as a general alartu is given and guards are posted at fre- quent intervals on the- lakeside to give warning it any overflow occurs. The lake is situated at an elevation ot nearly 100 feet above the town proper. A natural dam between ad- j jacent bills forms the boundary which holds the mass of water back and along the top of this is a roadway. The water, usually several feet below the level of the road is now separated from it by but a few inches, and a stream runs fourteen inches over the stile-way at the outlet. Rain is still falling. Instead of Grandmother the Husband Meets With an Embrace and Troubles Are All ation Made in the Course of a Meal. CINCINNATI. April has been more alarm throughout the Ohio valley to-day on account ot floods than at any period since February. 188-1. when the Ohio river reached its high- est stage of 71 feet and Inches at this city. Most ot tlin Inhabitants of the valley spent tho night In anticipa- tion of the worst flood ever known in tin: valley as they will not know until to-morrow that the water has begun fulling at Plttnlmrs. Until thin news reached the river men here to-night. It was fenrod that Hie record of 188-1 might be broken but now It Is gener- ally believed tluil the river will not exceed Ihe floods of February, and of March. 1898. when It reached feet nf'Olnclhnnti. The prevent flood Is the worst- that been Known no Into In the spring. Tim first week In April. 13SC. tho river reached tin fool, ami Inches In Mils city that was the highest water ever known late In the spring. There hits been no flood In tho Ohio valley since March, isns. and these floods havo rarely occurred late as March, usually In Kebruary. The Hood will ilo much more damage HOW than It wotild have done nne or two months ago, "While the close ob- serving river men to-night are confi- dent that tin; record uf 1881 will not he broken unless another mountain Hood soon reaches Pittsburg, yet. it is now evident ttlat much damage will bij done beforo the present Is ex- hausted. While the water bus begun to fall at Plttsburg. both rain and snow have been falling heavily last night, anil to-day and lo-niglit all along the Ohio valley. Tlije danger line has already been reached at points above Cincinnati and It will be reached here to-morrow morning. The merchants and manufacturers in the lower part of the city have been working all day and night preparing for the worst. The Sunday excursion season was to have started here to-day, but naviga- tion was stopped because the boats could not pass under the bridges. Early this evening the weather bureau here announced heavy snows and rains along the Ohio valley, es- pecially in southern Ohio. The uni- form rise during tho day was 4.10 of n 'foot per hour, but the average Is high- er to-night. The weather bureau an- nounced that the danger line had been reached nt all upper sub-stations to- night and that it would be reached in Cincinnati to-morrow noon. The stage Av-as 4-1.7 feet at C o'clock here to-night and the danger lino is 80 feet. The mayor ot Portsmouth, O., tele- graphed that the danger line had been reached there and that a heavy snow was falling to-nlghU Similar reports have been received at tho weather bureau from all over southern Ohio and'us far north as Springfield. Owing to the general prostration of, telegraph and telephone wires it is Impossible to hear from many points. The trains arc late on all the railroads and some trains that were due last Might from the cast have not yet arrived. It is generally conceded that the fruit crop throughout the Ohio valley is gone and the dhnlttgc to the crops is very great. While the danger line is placed ut 50 feet here, considerable damage has been done to-night since tho stage ot tho. Ohio.river passed -15 feet. The stage at U o'clock was 4fi feet and two inches. Tlte crest of the flood will not bo hero till. Tuesday morning. When the rultts came earlier, cold weather followed them so that the snows did not. melt suddenly in. the mount.nius lull nt this season n nocond flood is tonral if wnrm weather fol- lows tho clearing weather that began before midnight here and elsewhere along tho Ohio valley, Tho worst of the flood will roach here to-morrow night and Tuesday. The hack water to-night has inundated all the liottoins of Mill Creek valley and the most of the Utlle Miami valley. The base ball park Is on the west side, and it will be under water when tho stage of feet is reached. The race track at Newport. Ky.. will be under water at 58 feet. When the stage reaches, 53 feet, to- morrow, Ulg Four. 0. K. O. South- western. C. O.. Queen Crescent roads and other lines that use the cen- tral station will be unable to get into their depots. PITTSBURG DISTRICT SUFFERS Railroads Alone Suffer to the Extent Of the Fort Wayne Line It Well Subtitling. April and Allegheny are slowly emerging from the murky flood. At 8 p. m. the rivers wore receding nxuri? a foot an hour. The highest point reached nt Davis' Island dam was -fi.s feet at 8 p. m.. which means US feet til tin- junction of (he Allegheny .anil MOIHIII- gahnla rivers. The water remained stationary until about 'I m. when It began to fall. Conservative estimates of the total damage In this district Is between and Fifty thousand workers are suffering from enforced idleness. While there have been greater floods at this point, there never one that cailsed so much financial loss and discomfort. This was due to the dense popula- tion caused by the recent rapid growth of the two cities and to the fact that all the manufacturing plants on the river banks' were In active op- eration, most of them were working night and day. until the rising water put out the fires and drove the work- ers to higher ground. The loss to tho railroads entering Pittsburg from flood, land slides, wrecked bridges, heavy snow ami the interference with traffic is estimated at Oh the Fort Wayne the worst trou- ble was a snow blockade betwoen: Sa- lem and Massillon. O. This began Sat- urday morning and tied np the road for 24 hours. At fl o'clock this morn- ing the track was cleared and trains began moving. The same trouble kept the Cleveland trains on. the Plttsburg Lake Ei-lo late, five trains haying been blockaded at WIndom, near Lca- vittsburg, for 25 hours. This snow fall did not extend east of Now Castle, but at Youngstown it was two feet deep and drifts In the cuts north of that city were up to locomotive headlights. Tho wreck of an Brie train blockeft the road so that deep drifts formed. Water was two feet deep on the Lake Brie tracks at Sawmill Run but trains got through. Big landslides occurred on the Pitts- burg Lake' Erie, the it. O. at Skobo, on the Panhandle, on the. south side, the Bessemer at several points, and tho Allegheny Valley nenr Frank- lin. The slide above was about IfiO feet long and it required fourteen hours' work to clear one track. Through west, bound trains were loaded at Thirty-third street, passengers being transferred by street cars. At Skobo, iKitween. Monaco and Ali- qulppa, the Lake Erie received its most serious landslide. One hundred foot of the west bound track was car- ried fifty fuel down tho stoop bank, tho whole face of tho bank slipping down in the river. On the linos of the Pnnnsylvanla and Baltimore to Wheeling great damage is reported and both lines wore tied up several McKINLEY. ROOT AND WOOD TO RECEIVE DELEGATION THIS WEEK. Congressman Platt is al of Islanders to Accept Amend- ment Means Continued Occupa- for Insular Decis- ions. RESERVOIR THREATENS TO BREAK. UEIJ-EFONTAINB. O.. April Lewigton reservoir has not yet gone through Its banks but fear still ex- ists that it will, and vigilance has not been relaxed by the people In that vicinity. The break of eight years ago that devastated the country below ami ruined farms and'swept away bridges Is still fresh In tlio minds of the peo- ple and they are keeping up tho vigil to see that all small breaks arc quick- ly repaired. The Intensity of the sit- uation Is partially relieved since last night by the falling of the wind. (Cont.lnuort on Page Five.) BROKEN DAM LOOSES DEVAST- ATION. CHESTGU. April Flood Hollow dam In MlddU'flelrt gnvo way about.

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