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Fort Wayne Daily Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 30, 1881 - Page 1

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Publication: Fort Wayne Daily Gazette

Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana

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   Fort Wayne Daily Gazette (Newspaper) - August 30, 1881, Fort Wayne, Indiana                               A; VOLUME XVI1I.-NO. 39. TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST SO, 1881. PRICE FIVE CENTS. '0 THE LADIES VIXASS OAIJ., AT And examine the unusual variety of CHTWS j IMPROVING. Every Indication New Points the Recovery. Tke laflamed Gland Dimin- ishing in Size and Doing Well. The Patient's Hind Perfectly and Absolutely Clear. In wbite and fancy eolon, Ju.st Heceived. Child's extra Knee Panto in all ages. that the Work Repair will Go On Rapidly. -1 THB OHIiY LADIES' RECEPTION ROOM AKD CHIIDRES'S DEPffiBNT IK THE CITY. OWEN, PIXLEY 4 CO., Court, tc. 68> eocilnton Stt. to Caption room on Clinton WAJftS, HTC TTf-inted-A cash Mergenthelm'i. nonto ifl A'UnnBTiui 'maBiggsasrJ f _ Inquire of 0- AND] EB3OS. nor (or Inquire at: this oBpf. the oarthMit cor- lor otoBipar, o. 8. B. SWEET, ping piper." o. trade tor horns mndbi J? or family on.Manmee Whlte'a addition. Addran 8. thU office. ._____ August winds'-> mqsjtlyp-.easterly, stationar; and Ohio val winds, raostlj stationary temperature aDd pressure; A officer furnishes the fQllowihg" special bulletin: Tjhe hurricane 'wMicte; on" Saturday "fore- noon entered ;the south Atlantt states near Savannah, has pursued with a-eonstant diminishing energi a is now Leaven worth. -Its path .has been" genera rains, but at this report fair weathe BEAVEB Aug.' A fire broke out here this morning between 12 o'clock, by -which Mellons Thorns steam grist mill; one large building of the Pittsburg hinge works and one large building.qf the, Beaver Falls .steel, works jvere consumed THe fire is supposelcfro' 'Have' origina- ted by' a s'parke frorfi'S locomotive o the Pittsb'urg Aiiake Erie rba< alighting roth to-day, and another piece of milk toast, and seemed to enjoy and elish them both." "Do you think he is better to-day ban at the same time "Yes, certainly I do; --His progress has been'miieh more even than The expression of his face ,nd the character of his pulse have urther improved, and he has thus far lad no fever whatever. His present condition is more favorable than at his your yesterday. VBBT About 5 p. m. Dr. Boynton came rora the sick room and said the presi- lent was improving and all were now of his ultimate recovery. He was quickly followed by. Dr. Bliss, who said everything was very prom- ising. "The president's said Dr. Buss, "is now 104 and is as soft and. natural as could be desired. He s sleeping quietly. His skin is moist and his face looks bright and pleas- ant." You regard this recent change as one of the most miraculous in the his- iory of surgery; I dare observed a reporter; "Yes, sir; he weit down as near to death's' door on Saturday as I ever expected to see a man go without dy- ing but since then "he has picked up I consider he has now point where he enters upon the plane of 'convalescence, and ir new -yon will he; surprised "tiy the rapidity with which repair will go pn in'his system." Hatters of Interest From All Parts of the EWorld. THE PRESIDENT. ____.......y'Augtist morning dressing" of the president' parotid was found to have diminished sensibly: since yesterda; morning; There nad been aplentifu discharge during the night from the three openings. .Another yellow spo was discovered, off %he side of the fac rehensions of serious blood poison- ng grow less every hour. [Signed] BLAINE, Sec'y. BULLETINS. Executive Mansion, August a. president's symptoms are as favorable at this hour as the corre- sponding hour yesterday. He slept ,he greater part of the night, awaken- ng at intervals and taking fluid nourishment. His mind is perfectly iljjar. Pulse 100, temperature 98.5, respiration 17. Executive Mansion, August 29. the morning dressing of the president an additional amount of supperatioa was recognized in his swollen face, which, being incised, gave exit to some healthy pus. The other openings on the exterior of the swelling are likewise discharging. But though less tense, the tumefaction lias not materially diminished in size. Nothing new has been observed in the condition of the wound. The usual daily rise in temperature has not yet occurred and the general condition has not materially changed since morning. Pulse 106, temperature 98.6 respiration 18. 'Executive Mansion, August daily rise of the presi- dent's temperature began later this afternoon than yesterday, but rose eight-tenths of a degree higher. The frequency of his -pulse is now the same at this hour as yesterday. He has taken willingly the liquid fooc prescribed during the day, and had besides during- the morning a small piece of milk toast. At' the: evening dressing; a pretty free discharge o minlshed in size, "and theTpiis pocket: are; together. ;We Jshal probably.make incision, to- morrow and release another eonsi'der quantity of pus which will b ready at" tha.t .time to "come "Do you look for a speed; improvement in thecbnditioja of the 'I think it will look a good dea better tomorrow, of course, it wil be several days, .before we oease tc feel, anxious about it." "What is the state of the "The wound' is doing, well. I usually shows the most improvement in the morning, but it is ter even to-night." -I don'trttiink tha now the president's life is in any di rect dainger' from 'the wound." "It is reported the ball has chaiigec its location. -Is such the 'Yes; we think the ball is rnakinj its way down deieper into the cavit; of the probably in the direction of the rectum." "Hpwdo y6u know this "We don't know it, but we thin! so, and we base our opinion parti; oh the "evidence of touch and parti; on the patient's own sensations." "Do .you regard this down ware movement of the ball as an unfavora ble STptatall; rather the contrary. I is very likely that the ball will hav to come out some time, and we eai get at it in the part of the body towarc which it is going as well as we could in the original location." "There seems to be_ some differene of opinion? doctor, with regard to th president's present weight.- Seere tary Blaine and Dr. Boyuton esti mate it at 125 pounds'. Dr. Agnewt, on the other hand, is reported to hav said he did not believe the presideu had lost as much flesh as tniswoul indicate." 'I don't know how much the presi dent weighs; but he has not reachec a dangerous limit of emaciation. A man can lose two-fifths of his, weigh before life in endangered. The presi- dent has not yet lost as mnch as that." In conclusion Dr. Bliss said the president had not an unfavorable symptom to-night, unless the slight- ly increased fever were taken as such, and 'that he looked confidently for more improvement to-morrow. All the members of the cabinet were at the executive mansion to-night, but all now m.) have gone home. The president rested quietly throughout the evening, sleeping most of the time, and his fever has subsided. Dr. Bliss reports his pulse at this hour at about 108 and his tem- perature normal, or nearly so. HOPES CONFIBMED. The evening bulletin is generally accepted here as a confirmation of ;the The patient's fever, little higher to-night healthy place from the pa- rotid swelling, which' is: perceptibly diminishing in size. The wounc manifests no inateria' change. Pulse 110; temperature 100.5, respiration 18 ;DB. HAJOLTON. NEW YOKE, August Frank HI Hamilton, who just returned from Washington; 'was found this evenini In his library :by an Associated Presi reporter. The 'doctor said been'i-sd nrisreprese'nted'iri an inter- C3oncierriing -the presideht tha' 'hejshould every re porter-a copy of what- he rthe-latter left. ;He had found sayings that-he-hadTieyer uttered; anc if -he, found..-that the reporter use' of any-expressions beyondihe :eopy He not accord him a second interview; The reporter then "Are you -reported correctly in an evening paper to-day that you- had Jn< doubt whatever but that the pfesiden would recover "No, not nay that o any patient, and much less of the president, in whose case it is peculi arly difficult to make a safe prognos tic. The reporter misunderstood me I said I believed he would get well but that belief is not an absolute as surance. It is simply my faith." A DRAMATIC SCENE., NEW YORK, August Post's Washington special says: "As hope returns more is learned in detail o the terrible anxiety of the last few .days. It appears that the surgeons after the alarming symptoms of the morning, decided that it was useless longer to continue the struggle, anc two of their number were selected to wait upon Mrs. Garfield and, inform her that medical science, could do nc more; that she must prepare forth- worst. The interview which oeeurrec between these surgeons.. and Mrs Garfieldwill, if reports, are true.be regarded as one of the most dramatic incidents in this. extraordinary case Captain Henry, marshal of the dis triet, and a friend.of the presiden and his family, says that Mrs. Gar field heard the news, and smothering her emotion, she arose and said "Gentlemen, you.shall-not give, him up; he is not going to die, he is going to live, I feel, I know it; go back- to your post, and leave it not until every remedy is exhausted, until death itsei has set its seal upon him, for I wil' not believe that he is dying." The late gain in the president's eon dition is apparent in four importan symptoms. The pulse is lower anc stronger, the stomach works better the inflamed gland is throwing pffiL disturbing contents, and the origina injury has again resumed its healing process. In a word, the president ha successfully passed another crisis. Executive Mansion, August 29, mid about the white house is quiet at this hour. Ther has been no change since 10 o'clock The Jennings apparatus was kep working until that hour, the presi dent- having complained of the exces siveheat. His temperature is now reported to have decreased sensibly and his pulsation is down to 108. Drs Bliss and Woodward are watchin to-night. Executive Mansion, August 30. a. is quiet in the sick room, with no ind; cations of any unusual change i the president's condition. The phy- sicians are dosing and the members of the president's family have all retired. hopes to-day. which was a than last night, has begun to subside, and all his symptoms continue to be satisfactory. Dr. Agnew, as he was leaving the mansion to-night, was asked what he thought of the bull- etin. "I he said, "It is a very TERRIBLE HURRICANE. Che Atlantic Coaat fcy a Terrlfle Wind Storm. Blown Vessels ana Property Generally 'orty lives lost at Port Koyal. all of Whomi Were Colored. AUGUSTA, GA., August ter- ific hurricane visited Savannah Sat- rday night. The velocity of the rinds was about eighty miles an hour Sarly in the evening the signal ser- ice office was unroofed and the in- truments destroyed. A portion of tie roof of the Morning News office was blown off and the building flood- d. The city Exchange was- badly amaged. A number of firms on Jay street lost heavily by dam- age to goods. About fifty private dwellings were more or less njured. The sheds on the new wharf jf the Baltimore steamship line were blown entirely down. Several flour and rice mills were unroofed and the lontents flooded. A large portion of he city was under water several hours. The Central railroad wharves were badly damaged, and the public parks shorn of some of the finest ,rees and otherwise injured. The de- struction to shade trees was very great. The Georgia infirmary was wrecked and the patients barely es- caped. A number were buried by ailing brick and plaster. The Ger-. man brig Mary Louise, Capt. Mink, had her stern badly mashed, and her rudder, bowsprit and jibboon broken. Her sides were also injured. The boat Maid of bhe Mist collided with a schooner and sunk. Several other tugs were injured. The steamer City iad a hole punched in her sides; A louse was swept down the river and three of its occupants, Mrs. Stokes and her two children, drowned. Mr. Stokes barely escaped. Engineer Richard -Fitzgerald was drowned. The loss of life among the colored: people occupying little: huts -the- nce plantations and along the river is very great. On TTybee island .the, house of i Henry Soloman was blown down ruins caught fire and. three persons perished. The family of. David- Bowers comprising seven persons, were all drowned.. A colored :woman-and; four children were .washed away in their house and Several other persons are... known to have perished at Fort. Pur; laakiv The; officers: quarters were ;flooded: lines to Savannah are all: down... warnings of the approaching some vessels along rthe ne.ws.of disasters will be'? received during the week.- The. storm lias been very severe and particularly dangerous fact that the wind shifted frequently and blew with equal severity from the north, east, northeast, -northwest arid west. At Beaufort the water-house wharf ashore 'and1 two--sloops: were washed-under the bluffs. The- streets are filled wittr water at Port Boyal. The bridge connecting the wharf with the cotton compress is washed away and part of the railroad track is destroyed. Ten negroes of the Coasaw mining company, who were returning home, on Saturday night, got in the ferry house at Port Eoyal ferry, ten miles from town, for protection. The house was washed away and the men drowned, the only loss of life reported. Several pilot boats and a United States tug were washed ashore. PORT BOYAL, S, C., August The hurricane announced by the sig- nal service department passed here Saturday. At Beaufort the damage was considerable. Forty lives were lost, all colored, at Port Boyal ferry. It seems that on account of the storm the fe ryman could not convey pass- engers across the river. The passengers gathered in the ferry house awaiting the abatement of the storm, when the house was carried away by the high tide. Seven bodies were recovered to-day. The number actually drowned is uncer- tain, but the rumors vary from twen- ty to forty. One washer and one dredge of the Coosaw minisg com- pany, in the Coosaw river, was sunk. No lives lost. Considerable damage was done to the wharves and lighters of the company. Postmaster-General York. All KtLiter in Trouble. MILWAUKEE, August edi- tor of the Manitowoc, Wisconsin, Journal, named Christie, was arrest- ed to-day for stealing money from his landlady. He plead guilty and was sentenced to thirty-six days in the county jail. in Mew YOBK, August 29. Postmas- ter-General James paid a hurried visit to this city, Saturday evening, and almost as quickly returned to his post of duty at Washington. Various rumors were afloat as to the immedi- ate cause of his visit, the main belief being that in behalf of other members of the cabinet, General James had been sent with a personal request that Vice-President Arthur should pro- ceed to Washington and be prepared for any emergency that might arise in consequence of the fully anticipa- ted death of the president. Colonel Geo. Bliss, who was present at an in- terview between General James and Vice-Presideni Arthur, said to a re- porter this afternoon: His presence here had no connection with General Arthur going to Washington, either to see the president or to assume the duties of his office, as has been before intimated. General Arthur takes his own counsel in regard to this delicate matter, and I koow full well that he will not visit Washington for any such purpose, unless asked to do so by the president. Hoisting House Burned. YoUNGriTOWN, O., August The hoisting house and a number of cars at the Leadyille coal company's shaft burned Sunday. Loss, fully insured.   

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