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Elkhart Democrat Union: Friday, May 9, 1879 - Page 1

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   Elkhart Democrat Union (Newspaper) - May 9, 1879, Elkhart, Indiana                                 ì  "Zi  ^he ^emocratiß ^niotf  1 A)(UÌ«UEIJ IN  PUBLISHED EVERY FßlDAY,  T«'>■»»»'•; a \'f»r. in Artvnrn'c.  C3-- F. SHLXJTT, i  j i'irm; \M> I'Uoi'IÌIKTOI!.  K»r 1.1) " Ji-c-'iiiiiiiM-l "ii'il '<(1 Hi-i.-ar-ariM'n! i  ini!«-.--, ili l.'i'- .•(" ti,.- pr.'iTi. i.T.  <>FKI< 1' ^l 'i" . "'•■r f. A'" I'"»  A^OLUMB XII.  ELKHART, ELKHART COUNTY, INDIANA, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1879.  NUMBER ,19.  EATES OF ADVERTISING.  I On." .■..Iiinni -.»M i Oue-lia!i .N'iiiniii ; "IllC-ilWrlf^r .•■limili  tiO  .. 4.'. (K,  ,. Hli C".!  u<.i),-(>¡.. l'I iiti.> r.i,- ti:-M ms.írtiini. an''  Ü cetile fcr iti!->'nfti  Bii>iiie>s Ciirii^, nut i.' tv[;-c. $5.1X1 por yoar.  -i ifiii huo-. Uil^ ^i/.■_Hi  Ten Uni-^ of thi^ i\i.i; c.Minitiii. s.o'^'r.i, jimI ):)r bij<!nç-ç r^r,!- Hll..vr() ih;it üímcI. -j.». ••  M. V  li  ! >  r  HI.kh., .1!., Altor  Attorneys at Law  Mil  rio  <•1, i:i!iliiiit. lud. t'omplotr .•iilv ¡il'^ír.i. t.^ in til« i-ilv.  WATKR líOÍ^TOR.  JOHN HORTON. M. D.,  Eîitriish Physiciau and Surgeon.  Tr.vilf '1 l.it(-i -il I'rosroi'iit  111.: Ilio-O  .^e.-oiifi I!  iitin.-  I,  Willi iiTiiiar.-ill.>lcil ■ n  !o--iitl<--. flmgnofc'Mi on tin.'  <.-t!<l or iTÍii;-' Urini' lii>t pas-eil ui i.iiltiiti.iii ro.Miif oviT Shuiiiwa.>'s N". HG Main flr'jct.  BOOK BINDERY.  Vio-.l,«.. HiiMc. I'i4inr'hl"li. ItlanU H.'oU^. .-I... Iwiin.i tood n\!<■;)! ira-.inalilo fi-iir.'^. nld W.oUs n'K;\ir i'lank of Mil Uinils mud.' t" •■rdc'ron Hhort noli.  ir.!..!.. t.y hi.iil |.ioi,i(i!lv  r  ;,Ilf.nd.-.l I... i i NK A; IU!(i.,  Klkart. !i..J.  .bîOJVlIEl  . H. THOMAS,  0'JP-A.TI3:iST-  lífíi.v »1 Kli.ii ilied.'(«'l. All. lon.i'-d I"  r,l... li.  fi .-i'l.  of Main Mrpfi. II .nnlr.v vroiiij.ltv  Justiceof the Peace.  FAfTW AÎVÏ» KAXi'IKH.  A B!jllwart1r»rap minn-ii «1 Ihmloor  At earlv morn: Uy IrHvifl iiiaineci. foot-wwwy. Mir«; Hi-s clot-hlnK torn.  !Ñom« wiiter cold, a crust of «ir»a<t.  3ll he»ftn?(I:  l'Hot bUDK«r won. this rnoal. he wilil. .MtKbtl»« hlHlntrt.  Thii "Indy of the house" (•«» l>v  Hfo uorltiona lool«!. Hp had Ihmîo trt^al^ teodprl.v Uy .livi'rsr.iok!..  Hi» w«M|inptv", too. sho quickly ».av  Was all «^»i:nied, I hat hr hoped » .on lo fill hi« mn« . Hut hp doomed.  To di>.»in)OintiiifnVs cniel «lioiî.  No cofTe«! hot. No no cake, nor nn.vthint: ^i'oiild 1m< hiK lot.  ■"Il i-ii-v*.-. ine inui'h. poor man." ..aid vIm  '*Yon are po low ; K'cti lí'n.lcr .®ÍHki'and ho' roffer Would nevi'r lio  "A chickon fri*.aHM»e or liroil«'*!  Wi-njtd fit nuitc llRhl Vo.ir ^loma^•h on ; Imf (hen i.^ (•[.oiled  Vonr appetite. • S't l.road filfin»' yon earn to lake  A mi nothinp hot V IVrhap? if yon ran'l oat a slake. You'd like a chop."  H*' ..aw the wood pile and the aur.  lier laufthter heard. IVoci edwJ .olraljjbt <« "inaklus i mok.-, .Said not II word.  THE PRODIGAL BOY-  i.n., 1.1 11  .tod M'.-i li-.  Koal .'dtale tiiiu-f  rtii-li .Mi.nt .Mark't. ioniei Miiin  aii.i .file, •Í.S Irain^n.'l' ..lóvl  li-'lis atteii.lc.l t. '.I piitiRract.iril.v.  I One liiu; aiiuiinniil aliiTiiooii ¡ts ;i coiiii-Ì Iry gi.'iitlriiiun, iiîtinc»! J.oiiis Dni^rhl. u;i> ; oil! for .'in liDiir's liti«' in his vehiclf, lie • oitnic upoii a fii-niiji (if iircliius sporthiic i» i the WMil. and amon};; Ihtjiu saw Iiis son. a l)oy ol" U-ii. flying hi.^ kite. The novel IhonjrJii siriiok Jiiin o) giving hi.s son a ri(]r."\vhilt! still tlying his Uilr, ami so iiy : his (k'sin- liifiliil'l timlc :i srat l>y his siile. ' llie liorsti trotti ti Oll, aii'.i tlie kit«'.strine:, n It n • i» . thnuisííi the li:i<-k "(■ Ih«' uügon, still hi.iil  yMITH (feHOÜöKINS, Propriet's ,,v,i,.':p¡,..-,..e.¡yonnAslcr. nn.in.aine.i th.-  Pacfiic Restaurant,  13« Hnin Siiovt.  W.l'Ili iiinal; U..ar.i '.I ren ovuert. i.iin  V all tio.iiK. ■ Díilde r!i(.--.. l.-e Cl.'ain  tnivrlinii Ulti- in ilic i:oi Ion:; ln-t'orc Itn-till- siiek, iipnii « Ilic  air. It «as, however. I'ov lost his hoh! ol" h Ihc kite rajiidl.v (If-  Silin  attitmli'. ■ tri'es.i'.  mil "lisap il ¡111.1 :t  AÜGTIOKTEEIH.,  h:i.i{¡íAiiT. /y/'/.i,v.i.  Wili attend pr.iiiiptl.v nil tlie low'.-M rate". A'l.lr.  ..II re at 11.^- oflii-O  ;kIIb l..r piit-li.-  1» Klklillll. 111.  iV.in.-.  «eo. i'- Barney,  AtJorne.v-at-La w. Insurance and i Collecting Agent «iHc 1 its MniTt Str««c<.  KLKIIMir (XrifAXA.l  n. PROfTOR, GITY ENGINEER, i  I- n<.iv pr.'ratofi I" «t.. w..-k in (be .leparinK-nl of l,»mlK»>»-ve.vliig. (iritöiav- H.rrtrHull«-«-1  M i'iideil IVoin it jiearinf; In'hin sw.ninp lit;yon<l.  To rojiain what was n-.i nilleli prized liy Ills son. i! iiossilile. niihoiit loo nineh etVort. the tatln'r ilrovc I'aek, .•iii'l now saw that on«'ol" the group of children had already started in i)nr?<iut of ihe missing toy, and was wending lii.-i diftieiili i'7>iir.<e through the swamp, froni wliieh in .lin-time ill' mude his way l>a< k, with a .^hout iif iiiy. bringing tlif unhiirnie'i kiie .•iiid its roll of twine, whieh, on reaching !lie road, lit; inesenli'd « ith .^iniiiiig grari' to tlifir ■ nvni'r.  "Yon are a gallant and unselfish Inn," saie Mr. Dwight, giving him a handful of pi neo: 'what i.s yonr Dann".'"  ••Herbert Arehlev." said t.hf youlh. blushing at iheroiTH>rniienl and lifting his e«p in n^eognitioii of it .md tiien. turning to iiis playmates, hr divided among them wliai he had received by to.ssing the ei.dns into the air and saying:  "Come, boy.s, here's for a serüiuhle!'" ííis eoiupanions jn'o\e<I theinselvcs not low tj> acf-ept the otfer, and young Arch  Kt. Orrtei Main an'1.1:  . <-Xll.'.l!lioll.-l "ki.'n i-troot-  alleiide  Elkl'uri,  I to. o liidwi).  his scant portion with the  ^ew Restaurant  -\NIl  Boarding Hall,  ir-  Ft  fndcr P.Í Main  J f.rornili. .  ri!> iiM'als si'i'ved  ■rs i;  at  •t. ValLlerlip'« HlorU.  riiol'h'l HT<)H.  It all hours. r.o;in;-nini'i.lat.'d at rrasonabli A luneh eonnter will njijdieUat hours with hot. eotr<'i'  and liineh at I'l asonaijle J>riee^.  iKiied. Kr.i^h Ovi-tei'.'. I.y the .-¡in .  Ill  li'ie in  dii-ti.  R. .1. HAOOKRTV A «»N,  Pli^sicians  .A NP  Surgeons^  F.LKÍIAIÍT. INDIANA.  May be conMiIlo'l at their oftice, 'imp Fior.', No. 00 JIaiii utrwt. Saturdays from S lo 11 o"cK..'k ¡i. i  p. in., ííBfred. Iti'. 11  -Ü.'els.  iin.l at all lioura lyheK not .'rty'i- roi.li'iK'o, corner  ler Hill .II- Millers II Wedijewl.'i.v.i nii.l .. and t.i ó ■ "clock profe.-si.»niiI|_\- «'n-  i anil Vninktin  L.r  OR. WM. KIPLifiCEg»,  ! I' Ti I'ISC m Y SI CÍA  "ñiei'oi) líarison ^ítreel. rear of Ma-eiiine .sli'ip. Oj)en all bunrs, .'ind will an-swrir all calls in eity or eonntry. Cancers and Tniviors treated sue.eessfnily willionl i lie use of the knife. Reinemliei-." ilarri-.-.11! slr.'ci, Klkhart, Ind.  FâMiirsïppiTsm  loi main í^t.,  Eikhart, - - Ind.  C. T. Greene & Oo.  JOHH RO0ERS,  tSt-i MAINiS^TREET, KI.KHART. fW».  Mnnufncinrcr and Dealer ix»  Breech and Muzzle  Loading Shot Guns  AJil)  IMPLEMENTS  OF ALL KINDS  ol ih.' Willi«. Jlu'i^ilu ioaiHrifc Gtias tak«» in «X-tiiinKo for Brooch I.oadom. Second littiiU muzf.li> ..¡uliiiK gun» for nalo clicnp. I Imvo o Inrg« and coni-liltfojifock of car triilfre» forBreeoli Loading Shot Guns' resuly loaded, put tip in nny number utiil wnrranted. l-U-jiicial att^Dtiou given to repairing.  The Havilantl faience has held its o^wa secret until recently. >ris8 McLaughlin of Ciiicinnftti. has cuscovered the secret of thc.famoua process of imder-glaze paintinfj, .•similnr, if not identical, with tlie Havi. litntl j.tr ..y/ss. Specimens of this lady's work nrcon exhibition" at the Art Loan iSxhibition.  Mfv  ! glee, took i others.  ! "Voii are too generous by Jia If," eMclaiiu-I ed Mr. IJwighl. adiniringthe bo^-'s lienev-olenee "■{uite as uiiu h as his good natured I service and politeness. ""Vou must iearn to h<' ni'tic rarefiil 'if joiir mean.s—when }i>u grow (jlder, at least, or you will find it a thankless iin<l very rude world to live in."  •Ah, hir," suid the boy. with a inigliter ghinee even than before, ¡mil again ilofliiig iiis eaj), "tathei taught me ise\er to be mean, and to b<' unseltisli always makes me feel hapiiy."  His looks told the truth as elot iiently as iiii; wonlsand loni', as he sti.>od t the road, his tine, open, handstnnt rosy with health and beaming with intelligence and .joy—a far more beautiful object to contemplale ihan even the dccliji-ing Sim, wlioseli.ghldi.«played liimto such advantage,  "The sun is lengtheuing your shadow, uiy l;oy," .saitl lhe,ii:entlemau", reflecting for a moment. "And ev<'U so it is with the light of exijevi<'nce. which iniireases the Hluuie ol'.sorrow tlie longer it- shines. Take my advice, mj- boj-, and hereafter never give all your sjiari- money away- lie liberal as your father taught you : but save at least half for yt>urseliT There is no virtue prevents lK»th the jKiwt-r to be.just and t») Ik! generous.'"  "1 thimk you, sir. ft>r the advice, aud 1 will irv to follow it.''  "tioiid afternoon, m,\ boy."^ •'(}ot>d-bye, .-ir."  As they rode home, which wa,s not, far from the ueighljorhoml, Mr. Dwight learned from his son that !Mr. An iiley was a poor hoy. living with Jii.s tvitiowed mother: that" h«i wsis a. forward rchol:ir, and so generally a t'avorite that itn-sents wen-Often made to him, and th«we he. aluvost as often «listributed among his comratie.s, between "wliom lie seemed to make little dis-tincliou.  Within few days Mr. JHvighl again met. young Archley, and repealing his" injune tion to "save half at lea-sl." gave him a ii)0»i«.'V-bo,\ for that purpose. And the boy. smiling, again promised, and. ap-j)lâudcd bj' his niother. did as he h:id been ad visetl, careless and thought less of how-it accumuliited, from month to month. The gentlemen who had been so intere.sted in hini often gave him small sums like otiicrs, thoufrh'debarred like others, from rendering his mother a&sistance. which an honest pride forbade her to accede, and ol which health and industry pnwented her from being in absolute neetl.  A j'enr jia.sscd, au<l chancing to be m the comiiany of <!vil associates. Archley got into trouble with thein. They coin-mitted some thelY ni which Archley did not share, and of which he was i.çnorant until he wa.s arrested, like them, and tried as their accomplicc. Information of the affair being brought to .Mr Dwight, he felt convinced ol the boy's innoccHce, and after ffu.stioning him undertook to plead his case: which influence, hcwever, only succeeded so f^ar against the false testimony of the really gnilty, that Archley was "fined for trtspa.ss while the others ■were more severely dealt with.  TThc shame of the accusation seemed to overcome the boy far more than the fear of punishment, howerer un.just; and he ■H'ept more bitterly than the young repro bates who had thought to make, him share their punishment as -(veil as their disgrace.  " "You need not shed tears my boy," said his temporary protector, soothingly, so that all could hear. i'None -who know you could think harm of yon. The best are often injured by false evidence beyond their power of oetense against law; and in this case the.penalty it prescribes for you 1 believe you can pay, without do pending on anybodj- bnt yourself."  •'My"mother is so poor," .sobbed the boy, that 1 don't like her to pay s.o much and how can 1 pay it?" '•"What have yoti done with the box ?" "Oh, I forgot that; but I don't think there can be much in it from the little have saved up in it, "Send foi it, we will see about that." The little box was therefore brought and opened In court., abd, muéhto the surprise or the boy, far more was found in it than was demanded to meet tlié penalty. This diiicovery cheered young Archley, for he  was now relieved from his mortitication and dependency by l»cing able to pay his tine with his own money, which he ditl with some pride: and, with hi-^ mother, his friend and his box, he marched out of  ourt amid the cheers of his joj'ful i>lay-mates.  'Von see, my yoiin.g friend, that by being provident, without being mean, have been able to ri'seue yourself from difllciilty." saitl Mr. Dwight, on parting with them. "Hear the lesson in mind, in future, as wi'll u.s yon have kept your ))romise, and you will tind il of service thronghout your lite, long after 1 am dead perhaps, 'fiiere is more than the ainouiU yon liave paid. I wished you to s» nd for "(he box. only the better lo 'illustrate what virliKi there i.s in provideucc. and how thouglitless iirodigality might have left you without a single friend to help or serve yiui.'"  The lesson linis hiarned had a doubly guild ell'ei't, anil tiie boy was more careful as to (he charrictcr of lii.s c(>tni>anion.« after.  The manifold chango of a few more years, transl"i.>rming tin.' boy into a m:in, involved other alterations in the condition . of his life. His mother slepr in the gryvc:  ■ liis godfi friend, Air. Dwight, had moved j awaj-, he knew ni>t whither: and he, in a I neighboring town, no less jiopular as a i man than he had been .'is a boy, had, by jdint of intelligenl enterprise, ai'i(niri'd a i thriving business, of which In- was the , head.  ; Fortune long seemed to favor the young : man, and ot'ti ii the image and couiis«'! of ; his early good ¡idviser came np before him i and the jireas-'int reinenibraiici' matle him I yearn to see him. lUit, unfortunately, the j advice which he renumbered he did not j follow, ilis benevolence ;md i-onfiding I nature, his •'agerness to oblige. ;ind his im)>ulsive synnialhy ai every signal of distress, liecainr known to all around him, i ami by slow and smx degrees the unstinted exercise of his unc.-i'lciilaling charily j annnlled the good results of his hone,st iii-i diistry. and eavried his allair?- gradually : into the background, where )irodigal gen ' cro..ii(y itfti it leat <'s a ni.'in, and wliere I debt inciirretl by helping others brings i distress and ruin upon the tl."-erted bank-' nipt.  Herbcf! .\rchiey failed, and found few l"riends lo praise. |>iiy him. or uet"end his hone.sty of lurpose, and none who were I able or darei to help liini. To him carte j now the old experiences of ihc loo bcnevo ! lent, who h;i\e le-s*. means to suMain lh;in I heart l<. ¡Mompt generous actions: and I though fortune did not so utterly torsake  ■ him as to consign the well-meaning debtor i to a jail, his freedom lo wander seemed no ' liberty to him. who. as he i'-ft tli-' town, a : poor and censured man. cuulrl not !e:ive ; iis recollections also behind.  Tin: iiniinsoiied thought was itself im ! prisonincnt, as, wlien far awa.y, Jte brood.  d, in poverty, over his follies and inisfor. i tunes.  ( '•^Vas not every ihonghlful step we lake , in this world thronged with ]iroofs of our insignilicance and ignorance, wo uiiirhl ] dare attempt to grasp at :ind. arraign the \vi<-dom of the Almighty.'' he reflected as ' he mourned. "Yet, in "what liffhl T have,  ■ it sonetimos seems unjust that charity ¡should be the cause of its own puni.sh-  ment, or be permitted at :ill to suffer. Buf,  "His sight may be poor." thoughl Ar< h. ley: "but I will test his meino'ry by a surer method. Old gcntleiniui. I was born in thi.s village, and hiive been absent many j'ears. 1 have Vieen standing hen; for some lime, looking ujion the scenes which are more interesling now* than they were wlien J played liere, thirty years ago."  "Thirty years ago'.'"'exclaimetl ohi Mr. Dwight, sta'-ing at him. "Why, I used to live here then.''  •Did you. indeed'r Tnen perhaps you niighi, be able to tell me what became of a veiy fine gentleman wlio lived here at the same lime, but went away Ix'fore 1 ditl. Ile was out riding one dàj-, and I saved a kite for his .«on: .-ind on this veiy .spot he gave me some pence for it, htuI suine very good advice into the. bargain. Mis nam. was l.ouis Dwight " "And yours is—— "Herbert Archley."  "Why," cried the ;istoiiisiied old gentleman, holdinir up his hands to heaven: ''mereifiil ¡'rovidence.' is this you, my dear young friend'r Let me give ym: a gouiriiug:'' And, laltering toward him, he gave him an embrace which was returned with interest, and then, in brief, they exch.inged h¡.stories—that of Mr-Dv.'ight bluing f:ir more nu'lanclioly tliHii An-hley's.  His son vs.'is dealt, his property ail gone.  TELEGRAPHIC.  and he w as now a ilependent n loneliariiy, where oni e he h;id lived in at! nenee.  Arehlev heard in silence, with tears: lint he brightened them with a •~mile .-is he said:  ".Mr. Dwight. I believe that (ioil h:is ordered that we should meet litis day, ami we inecl, sir, never lo ))arl until one of us i,s dead. Vou are now |ioiir, but 1 am rich. All tliat 1 ))o.ssess I owe lo yoiir early lessons to me. 1 w ill protect ;ind comfort j ter and .1 yon wliile lit'c lasts, and repair your losses j Louisiana as well as I can."  And here Herhcil .\r<'hiey pro\i'd lru<; to his woni: :ind thus it was that good advice, in kindness given .ind with reverence obeyetl, resu.led in a rich reward to both. The bread of wl.sdom had lieeii early ca.st li|)on the waters, and il relumed "after many day^,"' in the shape of siibslantial .gratitude.  MISCELI. ANEOTJS.  .Vibauy, 3Iay 2.—Governor Seymourlias tvritlen a long and elaborately' ¡jreparod reply to ihe letter of the eommiuee of the j Belnionl conference, asking him to acce the noiuiiKilion for governor next. fall. He refuses to ac<;eiit the nomination, and in the most positive terms asserts that he has permanenily retired from politic.s. He discourses u)ion the present cimdition of the democratic partj- <.>f tlie state, pointing out the dangers, and must earnesilj- and eloquently urges peace, harmony and unity.  Harri.sburg. I'a.. May '¿.—A resolution ■•vas .adopted in the house to-day by a strict pfirts ote authorizing the aj)jK)intment of a jofnt committee to welcome Gen. (irant, upon his arrival in this country, in the name of the coniinonwealth of Pennsylvania; j)rovided there .'ihall bt! no e.xpen.se to ihe state.  Cincinnati, ALy 'i.—George A. Meller. wharfmaster at P'oster, Ky." a landin.g about twenty miles aliove this t:ity, was shot lasi night. by William Sells, a lM»y who was partiiilly intoxicated, aud who liail been ejected t'rom the wharfliuat liy Meller. ■ (t is thonght the kilter's wound's are fata!.  Vicksburg, .May 1.—The Mi.ssissippi Valley labor convention, which assembles here to-morrov,'. give.s promise of being largely altendeil. Already many dele.gate.s from the river comities of (lie 'Mississippi have arrivetl, and vwiy train and steamer is swelling ilienumbers. Among thenoteil  Cincinnati May 3.—Win. Lalluncc A George Hhixles, who were on a hunting and fishing trip, crawled into the engine house of the coal works at New Haven, near Pomeroy, Ohio, Thui-sday night to sleep. About one o'clock yesteitlay morning the house caught fire and "burned to the ground, the'sleeping young men being consumed in the fiames. Their bodies were found in the morning charred beyond recugnilion.  Poca.sset, ^lass. May —Fieeman, who made the sacreflce of his child in obedience to a revelation, has been arresletl with his wife. On the way to (iriaon both loudly |>roclaimed tha"t the death of the child was in obedience lo a devine mandate.  FretMuan, the adventists of Pocassel, who murdered his Jive j-ear old child on Thursday, was arraigned al Hanistablc to-tlay with his wife, who is held as acce.s-sory. Both insist that God will fully just-ifi' their action, and relieve ihcin froiii all human penalties. A number of advcntisl m^ighbors su.siain Freeman in his course. Sonic of those present at the meeting ,Tt Freeman's house on the day of the murder, will 1)0 arre.sted, the charge Iveing ac-ce.ssorv lo the deed.  Providenct.'. May t:?.—Calviu"s extensive stables and six cottages liurned this morning: a hostler and riftv horses perished. I.OSS, $3r>,00().  Key West. May The ship Mary  asht>ri: on up. The  venting an explosion and holding on n/itil assist.'inee came, when Hard-ing was airt>sie(i and reinaineil in eusuidy until an early hour this morning, wiien he gave bail. .It this morning he ca  tered Light'.s otlice .ind fired at him .sev eral times, missing Light, but hiuing an employe named (ierhard Losins. iiitliciing a serious wound, and Hardint: is uow in jail awaiting tlie result of that nonnd. Another employe of Light's named Kich-oiu of the second  the tiring, breaking  —.Samuel Pavey and . extensiviî dealers in and instantly killed Saturila\' nictit, bv  l>ersonages who have signified their jiur-  pose lo be jn'esent are <n)vernor Stone, Jas. Hill, of Mi.ssissippi. F. Morris Ches-Lewis, colored men from There is a diversity ot opinion i as to what the convention will reconi-I mend: some delegates favor a better under-I standing lietweeli einployerand em)>loye,ur i wages and polilieal rights, while others, j more ultra, will introdiice resolutions fa-viiring a plan for reidaciug lost lalior by Chinese and white emigrants. Another coiitlici will arise if a ri'solution which has alre:idy been prepared be introduct;d.  baring in the scramble with higii i now, how well I recollect the counsel  face \ mourn  given me by that good man in my youth— to be kind, without giving all away, ;iDd that one might be provident wilho"ut being mean. He gave ine a fatherly Ic.sson in those hajipy flays, and T was M iser, because more mindf"ul, even then : bn', grown confident, by success, 1 neglected tlie ad vice which would have spared me the trial.y 1 iio%v bear; the loss of good reymte and the ingratitude of ttic undeserving, for whom I hate injured the worthy; and the tongue of scamlal, for inability, which is tniscallcd dishonesty, oj)presses me more even than the lack of means, w ith which, if not thrown away in acts of mis-tJiken benevolence, I would gladly repay all. >But yet, to sit down thus and meanly like .loll, will never lilt me up again. 'I'here must still he time iuid op-l)ortunilics to redeem my,self. T am still young aud strong, aud may j'et prm'e wiser, if I faithfully follow liie"(-ounsel of him who understood me so well in mj boyhood. ITenceforth I ivill doso. 1 wiil stT"lve harda.gain, and the lesson of the little box shall'be my guide as I toil."  Animated by the resoUiliou he hail formed, half the load which had ojipressed him vanished. Among strangers ho eii-tered ane,w into the mazes of busines, and though his iuelaneiioly memories sometimes made his struggles less energetic than ho wished, their discouraging efrect was more Ihan offset by the .great object he had in view—the ultimate power to clear his reputation at home from all stain.  Stray .gleams of success multiplied and ;athefed, as he proceeded slowly but stead-ly toivard th(.' horizon of his hopes, and at last ripened into the inspinn.g dawn. Often, while the night of his distress was vanishin.g behind . "him, the old prodigal impulse which had caused it would le-turn upon him; but he checked it by the memory ol the little box; and while not mindh«s of the chiims of those who were, more needy than he, he learned lo feel that there was yet somefbing nobler than extravagant benevolence; "to be just first and then generous, ami that, lieside what was due to his creditors, ttiere wa.s much due Uy himself.  By this line of conduct he rose again to substantial prosperity. Experience had  "»I'li.i- atonie» .llsjiT.v.  \';iiiit,\ P:!Ìr. in ar.'eeiil issue, sa\s: Tlie <|Uestion which we considered last week. "Why Men Marry," is :in interesting one ; but if must be pronoiiiiecd inferior "in in  re .red  leresf lo ilie ijne.stiini. ' Wh.v Women Marry" in the tle.giX'c in which men arc in all respects less interesting than women. The willin.irness of women to marry is greater and more paleni rhan thai of men: and. we will add. thai it is a great dcjil more wDiulerful. Th ; '.voineii have, to use eollonual jihra . , the worst ut" it :il! Ihroiigli life we ejitertain no doiili!, and thai liie niatriiuouial slate as understood by experience, has, as a rule, fewer ai-tractiinis fur them than t'or men, we als'.> lielievc to lie (nic. ^^J! wliere there at«-man.v men who fr»iii eiii.iee abstain from marrying, and still more who pni ofT marrying tiil the last )mictic;ible moiVient. we doubt if there arc any woinen w orth mentioning who refuse the married st;ite from option :oHi deliberation and not many many who postpone marrying till a late period of life from a rcpugnance lo hav ing a husband. The women refusu ui-dividu.'il men, aud somctime.s go I'li re fusing men after men, is I rue enough : but then tiieir objection istothe man and not to the condition of life Ihe man proposes: or. no! imfreijiiently. their refusal arises fi'oni mere sUiuisluiess, from ;i t'eeling they may d" betler. or from a cheerful conviction that there is plenty of time lo "think aliout it." i\.s a rule, however, ivo-men who have the chance, of marryintr. marry, and they wtiuld marry yei niore proinpth- than Ihey do were i) not that they are fre.)Uenll.v held back from takinir a foolish stcj) wise p>areals oi' di.ssiiad-iug t'riends. How" i.s this apjiarent paradox to be explained? There is less to in duce a woman to ma.-ry than to induce a man; yet men hesitateit toman v and women .)i"imp at marriage, ^5ome will answer that man is aralional and woman an i:ra t ional animal; but over :ind abov«- the dis tinction lieing too uncomplinientar.\- lo be true, it is one of those iilausible e'xjihina-tions that explain no'hing. Again it is sometimes allirmed that, in m'an-ying, acquire it.. Bui this is an epignim easily  wliieh sets forth that the caiisr pre,sent exodus is not ailribiited to tin striclioii of ¡he political lights ol  men.  A. loUer ri.'ccived ht.si night from Terta Landing seven miles ;ibove ^■icksbu^g saying l.'liO negroes arc Kansas Ixnind on ihe bank of the river and have picketed the roads. No conflict has as vet oceure.d beiween the white.? and hlack.s.  Higgs fnim New Orlean.- is Florida Reel and is breakin; cargo, cotton, is 'oeing saved.  San Francisco, Alay •(.—Elias Lipsis. stage man.ager of Bella Union Theatre, suicided last niirhl by shootin.u: himself through the body in the ine.sence of his wife. He shot at his wife a few davs ago. but subseiiuentlt' was recoiicileil. i'ear of trial and convic'lion of attempted murder was ihet ause of the suicide.  Memphis, Tenn., May L- A cutting affraj' occurred early this mornin.g over a .game of cards between Henry Harris and Frank Price, both colored, Price's throat was cut. and he vvill die. Harris was arrested.  Milwaukee. .Mav 4.- The boa! house of  ivlllo, Tenn.. Mav :;.—I,ast days  Weather clear aud mild, track 'in  very  First o  large all  race for for two  Xa r.'ii'in,  good eondiiion, attendauci the st.'inds being crowded, the yuiin.g America, stake Ni year olds, dash of five eighths of a milt; 2-j entrances, Price Purse Association lo add .■SldO, second horse lo have $.513, there were twenty uouiinations and six starters. The race was won in a canter bv .Kimball, the favorite. Bye and Bye '2il, .Bancri.>ft 3d, Blondina. Sallie Mack aud .lim Hcott lo the rear. Time, \ The ease with  which Kimball won this race.gives prom-i.se of a brilliant future. He is eutered in the pro'oiuent two ye-ar old events of the j-ear. Second race: Belle Meade, No. 1, for tiiree year old $60 entrance, half forfeit. (k-n. "Harding (o add da.sh one mile a half. ' Lord Murphy, the favorite. won etisily with " some lenlhs to ^ sjiare Alaichwness ■2d, Jlnry \Va!tun ikl, ^lontreal 4l}i. Time, . Last race, association purse, ."1200, mile heats for beaten horses, $.50 to rec ord. F/gypt won in two straight heats, i.'lemmie (i. ¡id in the .fust heat, 3d in second lieaf: Charle.v Bush iid in the first hcjit and yd in ihesecontl. Victim aud l^unc.au F. Kenner unplaced. This ends the meeting al this place, which has been the most succe.s.sfnl held for many years, the !!ltenihii5cc daily being very large.  '" fhe i the Mitchell dub, coiilaininL'- two liarges and four or live pai)er.shell s, was destro^'ed by tire this evenin.g, together with the contents. The house wassituatcd on the ri\ er north of the dam. :ind eould not be rcached bj' steamers.  iSl. Lonis. May Will. JL Vanderl'ilt and }).irt.v arrivetl from the west about one o'clock and took quarters at the Lindell house. Tlrcy will leave for the east tomorrow.  Cincinnati, (J.. Mav ^- —W. 11. Vander-b'ill and party from St. Louis, via Indianapolis, reached this city at 8:'s'0 t(>.night. Run from Indiana)ioIis to Cincinnati over the Indianapolis. Cincinnati and Lafayette railroad, 115 miles, made in two hours aud torty-lwo minutes. The jjarty are ,it the Grand Hotel to-night.  CiNCiKX.\Ti, May H.—For some days ilie crowd in waiting iit the Sub-Tretisury for United States ten-dollar refunding certificates has been immense. The approaches to the offices has been filled by these applicants. and the line of men and boys esj>ecially the latter, has extended some  iird "Wnters. jumped story window durin.u: both ankles.  Cincinnati, Alay o. his son Taylor Pavey live stock, were shot near Leesburg, O  Jolin Link, Paver's stej) son. Link, wh'o surrendered to tlie marshal, stales that he was enga.sed in conversaiiou with his mother at the .gate of her resideuce when the Viivcys tame up, aud after.sonn n<»rd < iitlacked him with clubs, when to save his life he drew a revolver and shot both. The causc of the ditlicully wiis ill trcaliaeni by Samuel Pavey of his seeond ti ife m ho w;is Link's mother.  Galveston, May ."».--.K special to the News from Overtoil says Unit as trie con-gregation wis leavi'ng the .Mithodist c .arch yesieixiay. Col, .tared K. Kirby shot deatl John Steele, who in i/uar-rel fourteen vears :igo. killeil Kirbv's father.  .1. F. Voung and ..I to escape troin j:iil The liames sjiread burned (o death.  Bridge Preston «ell whil himself  Hud.son. N. Y.. >[ay ."").— Lewi.s tXioiis. ofToghkanic. in a tit "of jealousy cut Ids wife's throat and then his ow-i. The woman is dead Coons will live. Both young anil recently married..  Xurlh Adams, Mass.. Alay o.—The Baptist church was damatred iliis mornimr by fire^4o,000; insurance sc.Sv'V,O0<l.  Newmarket. X. H.. Alay •'».—Pag.e it Cofiins i)a])er factorv bnrned. I,, ss. 000: insurance. i-SLt'lOO.  Detroit, .May •'».- Later accounts fr,jm lie lire at Hiiisdale. Saturday uighl.  ,'hn Hiley by seltin j rapidly.  :itt!nipted it on lire, and both  )ori. Conn., May —AI ISew fill thi.s morning Egl.ieri C,'o.:is-<; drunk killed his At it'e :i¡id  [lie of this eountr}- iii interest. 11. (.100,000. .•iinee the jtresent administniiion has been in iiower, it has .saved to ihecounirv fourtee». millions of dollars. This has been ell'ect-ingalike tile rich and the pour, 'i he credit of the nation has also sieadih advjmced and there is no n.'ition in the world ttia! can liorrow nioui'y at as favorable terms as the United Stalesof Auieriea. To dav the •1 per cenis of the Kiviich Kuifiiro are worth bnt cents less iliau par; oui bonds are ipioted hi.irher ihsin any other nation's, than iierhaps ihai of Great Brit tain. This is so, bcc.'iuse this country has kept its faith w ith ihe-s^oik!. Nowtherieh are not the only bond holders. "fhe man oi" moderate mean.s Ciin purchase bonds of any denomination thai he tiuiy choose at any money order postoniee in t'he counlrv. Both the bonds aud the eertificales are eagerly sought, for thcv are lieM bv every class in the laud. The great i|"ueslio"n that is now agii.-iting the public miutl, is the attemjit of \our representatives in congress to repeiil what are known as the election laws. These members of con-pcss arc .seeking lo >'epea) the unlc laws that in many cities and some Slates give the pe.iple a l":iir :ind full voice Have yon ever ihoughl Hr.it .\our onlv voice in the national govcriiiu'eiit lies iii the election ol' members lo eungrc-s once 111 two yearsl-'ver\ 1 svo yeiirs you are called to e.leet a uieniber of congre.s-. aud licit one UKUi will' represents you is your .■igem so I'nr iis lii.- national goveninie'nt is concerned, ^"ollr only voice in ihe go\ enmieni IS when \ouv.>ie fur a inenVber of congress, in a' greai nmniier of the lareer eirK;s elcciions .ire c.irri"d by iVatul aiul unfairness. In tin: ¡¡real city '">f Ncsv York there are wards that have been carried by fraud :nul reiH'iUers for llu; hist forty .\ears. In .-ouie of ;lie southern state.s intimiihtiioj! and fraud is conducted openly at the jiolls. There are n»w nu-m bers in cougress who hold their seat.s bv fraud and iuiimidation in the state of Sonth Carolina. Thousands of tissue ba]. lots were cast last fall: lilllc ■ pieces of pavier, t'orty of wiiieh would not make as great liiilk as one of tlie tickets voted by yon here in Kichland l ounly. There was voted ;it once. and. by one voter, in South Caiolina, more votes last fall than there were men, woinen and chikireii and cats .-md 'logs in  stale thai the loss on the >laning mill and I till'city of New York. Al one election Inmljcr yard owned by K. C. Cauijiljell >fc Co. was -^T.j.OOO. No insurance. The aggregai-' loss on Ihe five dwellings liurned was .«(0,000. Insiirancc liirht. ■  ">Viieii men sacrifice what ia iberty by marrying, lliey are  .............................prosperity. .v,,.,.,  not been wasted upon him, and his second  ordeal was triumphant. The memory ol ...........................  the little box was a talismanic. ,£rnide to him. One-half of all his jirofits he uniformly put by for future days: and freed from all former indebtedness, he found him.self, in the prime i>f life, not merely commended for b(;in.g jjenerous as well a's honest, but secure a.ganist the, wiles antl wails of impostor.s, and wealthv without having been a miser.  Thus enabled. 1^3- a courageous adhcr-enne to the provident, rule; which was at first repugnant to his nature, to return in joy and honor to the town which he had left in disgrace, he revisited the scenes of his .youth, and as he wandered among them and revived their as:iociations, he thanked God that he was now as happy as he had ever been when he played there. The old cottagc was torn down, bnt the grass grew green over the graves of his parents, and he fell that their souls were in a changeless home. The natural landmarks remained unaltered, and as he  dis iosed of  cal ed their_______ _______  already tired of their liberlV, or thai par-ti(;ular form of it which bacheiorhoud enjoys, and. were points thoroughly e.vamin-eif, wo suspect it would be fonnci that they abandon a form of liberty of which they are weary for another form they have uoi ))ossessi;tI.  One ^lillion S*OHtase-$*tami)!w.  Some, time since a Philadelphia .genlie-man otTered ¡in old lady the sum of .f!200 if .she would obtain'for him 1,000,000 canceled stamps, the money lobe used in swuring for her a life-residence in :i Home t'or tin; Friendless. ,Mi.<is (."hlot; I.ankton, of New Hartford. Conn.. bec:tmc deeply interested in the measure, and on Oct. 10, 187H, b(;gau to assist the ladv in making her' collection. Others a.sssisted Aliss Lankton, packa.ges of .stamps bein.g .sent from New Haven, It art ford, Boston, and points as far awa}- as Dubuque, la. Amon.g the. liberal donors.are Mrs. T..ncy Case, of New Haven, who gave ^liss Lankton 320 .stamps, .some of tluan of thetii-sj issue all cut from her box of neatly j)ae.kcd lei-lei's. AureliaE. (.'ase, of New Haven, contributed f.<.f to the collection. The leen collected ;ind the urood work accomjilislu'd, as the. fol-lowiiig letter from Philadelphia, under date ot' Feb. ft. will show:  Afv DkaI! ]\Ij.ss I/.ankton: I send you word that the million .stamps have been collected, ;md $¡300 paid for them; a nice outfit given the old lad.y, who is now rejoicing in her comfortable home, the Alethoflist House. 1 know you :tre pleased to have been able lo contrilnite so largel.y toward the fund. Amours respectfully," Miss E. S. Fakk.  Boston, Alay 4..-- The luneral of Edith Freeman, ihe vit^tim of thi; father's icism took ))lace in '.he Melhodist churi Pocasset this afternoon. The body was brou.ghl to the church in a small casket by Aitieii P. Davis, w ho sj-inpathizes with Freeman in his deed and one of the lat-ter's chief abettors who, after depositing the casket and contents near the altar announced his intention of addres.sin^ the audience, but this he >vas preventeti from doin.^ by threats of arrest. Adv»;nlists who in their blind .superstition fully believed that the tlead chilil would be resur-reeled or else bodily tran.slaled to heaven are deeply mortifieil thai their prophesies should result in so ajiparent a non-fulfillment.  Afti'r the funeral service in the church, the body was n.-moved to the village cemetery hard V>v r.iul dejiosiled in the gi-avc. Davis, an advcntisl fanatic, mounted a tombstone and be.gan an address to the <-row<i a.s.scmbled,attiiinj)fing to prove that Freeman wasjutiiilicd by God in killing the chilli, but was prevented' by the crowd, xvho compelled him to desist, "The casket had been l overed with earth, tlie Atlventi.9ts having ihrc:iteiuil to sei/.e the both' and throw il in the water near by that the claims of the sacritice may uot Iw; interfered with. SheritPsolllcershave guarded the grave and will remain on watch till morning.  Panama, Aiiril •24.--The Star and Herald tells ;i slorj- of the aUemiiti'd révolu- __________  tion there; a 'plot to upset the .state .gov- j pjosiim of nitro gly ernment had been concerted by disaffected Trunk freight shi politicians who sought to purchase the  distance'in fhe street. Notwithstanding the order refusing banks the iirivelege of purchasing them, they have managed lo obtain lar^e amounts by proxies. One man standing in line acknowledged he had fifteen boys from factories, and who had by this means furnished one bank with .several thousand dfillars. Another has sold the banks a large amount at 1 j>cr cent, premium. The ammount given out yesterday was over §o0,000. The aggregate sales ammounts to $300.000.  Louisuille, Ky., Alay 4.—Horses from all sections of the country are rapidlj^ arriving at the Louisville .Jockey Club grounds. Jt i.s estimated that there will be 'JOO contests for the rich purges anil slakes. The free Derby day wili be the  Philadelphia, .May .'>.—The Pinkerion detective a.genc.c maiìe an important arrest here 10 da.y of a" person who is s'lppused to be one "of the ^lanhattau bank robbers. This morninga man very genteelIj ilressed offered for sale at DrexePs iS.ì.OÒ't worth of bond.s, luimbers corresponding with those stolen from the AInnhattan bank. When arre.sted he sho-.ved resistance, and the oillcers were obliged to carry him to headquart. rs. He gives tlic name of Henry Hall, but declines to say anything about ihe bonds or himself, liot even attempt in l' to ixjilain how the bonds came in his possession- He will be committed to aw.dt the rei|uisilion from New* A'ork authovii ;  St. Louis. Alay —I.cller.- are continually lieing received here from prominent persons m New A'ork, Boston and other cities east and south, asking ro w-hom mone^' can be sent for the benefit of negro refugees ff'om the south. In reply to those inquiries it w-ill be announced le.niorrow that any aid designed for these people who are arriving here almost d iil3- in a destitute condition, ma^- be sent lo Sam'l Hayes, postmaster of this city, -.vho will personally sec that ali contribmions are properly and judicially applied in aid 01 these iieople.  Terre Haute, Ind.. May ."5.—The. strike of the coal miners in Clay couuty district which began Aprili, is" about to culminate in a, coilision between tJie authorities and Ihe miners. This morning the miners al work in two of the mines were  ntliLlt ... ..1 • 1 • inii.ieis at m ujfanv.T  fanal -f?' "-'''t«"- ol the meeiing, antl primuses .n^a .top. and the union men de  luS if2 Clare their intention of ,..ix-venting furthe  free to the iinblic, and a .general holiday time is expected. The merchauls' stake, the most interesting event of the racing season, will be on the last daj', and the meeting bids lair to Ih; tme of the most brilliant ever held in America.  New York, Alay il.—-lames A. Hariolt. John C. Alaxwell, William Alaxwell and John Al. Staily have been arrested on a charge of having given applications lo dischargetl :<ok)iers for additional bounU', and with collecting the amounts. It is said the ring of ivhich the arrested are members, has defrauded out of over $100,000.  Ottawa, May 4.—^Bj- an order in council, importatifui or introduction of American cattle info the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia antl • Prince Edwards Isl.'Uid is further jn-ohiK ited till the fith of June.  'her  work until the operators will come to terms. Several ojieralors will atlempt to send miners into the shafts to-morrow, when trouble is expected. Warrants have been issued for (welre ring lea.;lers on a charge of riot.  strol led along the chief road of the vill.age, he paused awhile at the spot where, returning from the swamp with the kilo, he had first met the good man. Louis Dwight.  "He must be tjuite old uow, if alive," musetl he. "Let me sec; I was then ten, and he, perhaps, forty—my own age now. Three score and ten—the allotted' age oí man. He may be dead: or if' not, I .sun: pose I shall never see or hear of h'>m again. Htiw like a dream it all seems! Here I .am standing alive. Here is where he gave me the pence, opposite that veiy tree; and here is—why, bless me, who comes here V If this i'sn't the old gentle man himself, my eyes or my memory fail me."  It was a bowed old man, in worn and faded garments, who was approaching, walking slowly, with cane. Archley raised his hat respecfully as he drew hear. He had truly recognized him. It was Louis Dwight.  But his old friend and ativiser did not recognize him so q^uickly, though -he paused and returned hiagalutfttion.'  Osier Willow l^nlturr  \Vhile cverybodj- is looking for some new and better ])aying crops, osier willow-is coming to the front as a profitable crop under certain favorable circumstances. Ttiere are on almost evcrj' farm some low, wet places that could be planted in willow and produce more per acre than the corn .ground ajd take but little labor. It sells tor $13 to $20 a ton, green find un-peeled. The cuttings for planting can be procured of any large nurserj . They are planted two feet ajwrf, in row.s four feet apart, in well prepared soil, in spring. Cultivate same as corn for two years.— There are also large tracts of swampy lands that could be profitablj' planted in willow^ here in the west, and numerous crops of it would tlevciope basket factories, and willow would be used much more ex-tcnsiveh' for bug.^y and phaston bodies, baby wagons, besiiles many ornamental and valuable uses, if the willow were plentiful grown in the west, and thus save the expensive freight on the green willow or the bulkj' manufflcinred product. Try a patch of willow this spring; there's mil lions (of switches) in if.—fCtir. Western Agriciilfurist.  ollicers t>f the (,'ohimbia guanls on the i  New York, Alav o.—-lifuik statement: loans increase iJiS.'itiO.'.'OO: speci»; increase $288,100; deposits increase !|;»81,4.>0; circulation decrea,sed $24,5(K): reserve in-i;rcase f2,048,92o. The banks' uow hold .t4,;!73.77.'j in e.xccss of Hy^al requirements.  Wheeling. Alay -1.—The water works of the Baltimore aiid <?hio rail road machine shops of this citv iverc totally destroyed by Arc tonighL Ltiss $'i,000.  Stratford, Out., May o.—A terrible ex-eerine in the Graad Trunk freight sheds killed several men and destroyed IfiO cars ami sheds.  At a" few minutes before 10 o'clock to  isthmus. The commander of the regiment (In; whole town was shaken, as if by  After two hours' speaking under the flve-minutes rule by two dozen members ©u both Bides of thè National House, Sat urday, a vote was reacheil and the Legisla live, executive and judicinl bill passed, with political legislation attachet, by a vote of 110 to 140. The Greenbaeken? all voted with the Democrats, except Barlow and the House adjoùrned till Tvuaday.  becoming cognizant of the facts rebuked his oflii.-ers, which so incensed them that Captain AViadiah assaulted the Colonel with his sabre antl wtis shot down by the Colonel's son. aged 18, and a Lieutenant in the baitalion. The row then became general and continued until Carvajal and his son and four other oflicei-s aud several men were killed and froin eight to ten wounded. News of the tragedy -was around town antl the, adherents of the government at once decided to eheck an attempt at revolution, and to punish crimes in Cuartel. They kept up fire on the national barracks from half-past 6 o'clock till nearlj'- 9 the following morning when the troops unconditionally surrendered. There were 30 killed, anc! as many wounded, is the record of losses- The city is now quiet. Alartial law is proclaimed.  Boslo», Alay 4.—It was reported at Concord Junction to day that three officials Avho were in the second .stoiy of the shoe shop in the state prison, after the prison ers left for dinner Saturday noon, heard a loud explosion in an adjoining room occupied bj' the Warring hat manufactory, separated from them by a fire, proof brick battlement wall. Rushing to the window they saw flames issuing from the hat shop ancl '^itve the al;irni. It is believed an in-cendiarj' shell causc the explosion.  Bridgsport,. Ctinn., Alay 3,—Alachiiic shop tmd pattern rooms of the Pacific iron works burned. Loss $75,000. Insurance $10,000.  Cincinnati, Alay — An unoceupicd two storj'brick dwelling <m Pike street, fell last "evening iii^i tiring four little children who were passing. Their names are Marj' Welch 6 j'cars, ootli legs broken; Alary Flahertj', 7 years, one leg broken; Pat Flaherty,'0 years, badly bruised; Katie Do.yle, 5 years, right knee fractured.  Port Huron, Alich., May 3.:r-The steamer Kewenaw left here at 10 a. m. with a steam pump for the Propeller Benton, leaking at Tawas Oitv No further particulars.  Secretary iSht'rmau at lloiiie.  Mansfield, O., Alay o.—Secretary Slier man arrived here this mornin.g, aud took rooms at the Saint James hotel. He was visited largely in the forenoon by citizens of all parties." In the afternoon iu- visitetl the government 1 jjjg ilifferent properties in th« city and vicinitv'. on a tour of inspection. In the evening he was serenaded at. his hotel, when he appeared and made tlie following speech, a large crowd bei'ig in attendance: "lam very happt'to be again in your miilst. to .see your i'at-es and to ".greet .you as friends. Th" shaking of' your hands is inoi-¡jratef^iil to me than the music ot' bands ' "any piu-ade. I never felt before like making an apology for coming before you tui-til mow. The papers said I .-ame west. se<;kin.g llie nomination fen- governor. I came purely on private busines,s lo rci>air tlie ruined "fences and hx>k after improved in'opert.v 1 did not expect to iinakc a jio-;ilical siieech or refer ui any way to;i)olit-ical questions, iKiwcver, as you haye-t.sert;-n.a<Ie(i mo lo-ni.ght 1 .seize the opiwirtnuity of s)w,'aking freely on two . ot i'the great qiTestions now discussed fhrtjughout . the. entire hmd. There one iiuestion oi vital importance to all the people, republicans, deni ocrats aud ua-  morc than 3,5.000 repeater votes were cast this was proven by the in\esligation of a committee .)f congre.ss wlio made an elaborate report on the .sann;. In large cities there is always great danger of such things being "done. You are tree from this species of frauds. Here you tio niM know what fraud is. (_>ne of the most sa. cred duties of con.gress is the ¡jreservation of the purity of elections. There is buf one safeguard against fraud and repeating provided bv cougress antl now- an effoit is being made to repeal it. To me this que.s-tion is particularl3-important, thela^y provides for us, the people, a certain safeguard. It is sumetimes said that this la-.v is not as efiicicnl as it might be,— cungresscan easil3' change it and make it belter: but instead of making it a betler law, the3' seek to repeal it, and how do  passin.g a bill, e. TÍiej- pre-  anJarthquake. Windows were bl<íwn iii ! tionals. Yôiiifâoxv, f^lwv dtizens, that  and the .sidewalks .so moved that [icdes trians were thrown down. The t^usc was a car laden with dvnamite exploding at the Grand Trunk freight 3-ard. The wreck beggarn description: LTndcrn^ath the dynamite car a hole several feet tleep was scooped out. The end of the brick freight shed and a [lortion of the roof were blown down, several frame buildings were leveled to fhe ground and several .strings of freight cars in the yard were utterly destroyed. The business part of the town is nearly a mile from the scene of explosion, but it shared in the disaster. Valuable pliite glass windows were broken, and many others were blown in, frames and all. The dama.ge done to prisperty is e.'sfimatcd at many thousand dollars.  The railroad employees. Frank Lemaino, of Montreal, aud "rhomas Dolan, or Stratford, were blown into fragments. The foot of one was found two hundred yards off. Alany other persons were injurctl, but the extent of the disaster cannot be known for some time.  The car upon which the explosion occurred was fieighted at Alontreal for Amherstburg, and contained thirty packages which were entered as blasting powder. They were shipped on account of Vanderbillv to be used in blasting at the Detroit tuiinel. "\\Tienthe explosion happened the cars were being shunted into the yard. The damage will exceed $2.')0,000. Geo. Hawkins, a car dealer, had both eyes put out by a splinter, aud is not expected to live; Joseph Humphrey is badly cut about the head and face, but maj' recover; .¿yfred Lamb and Air. Flinn were badl.y injured.  Indianapolis, Alay 3.—Last evening aboutS o'clock George Harding, editor ot the Herald, entered tlie residence of Calvin A.IAght, editor of the Democnu, and attempted to shoot the latter because of ft certain publication |in the Democrat. Light grasped the pistol, getting hia fingers under the hammer, pre-  two years ag(>'w%en I had the pleasure of speaking to you on the public stjuarc, the burden of my specch-was about resumption of specie payment, stating if we could go back to gold t'berc would be fhe begin, ning f)f prosperity. Then loss follotved loss, and failure followetl failure, and gloom jjrevailetl. I declared then that if we would go back to the wavs of our fathei-s antl start afresh on a goliJ basis, supported by greenbacks and national bank notes, prosperity would again return. It hecomes my duly as an executive officer to carry oiit this policy. One year ago 1 hiid in front of this "hotel—on thi.s .same store-box, or one very much like it, to present to you ihe desirability of the result of resumption tm the first daj- of January. 1870. This imi^ortant measure was accomplished. Every dollar you had in your nockets became worth a dollar in  f)ld. Since that has been accomplished, come here to ask vou the fjuestion, arc you not satisfied with the result? Do you not think resumption has I been beneficial to you all? To-day a man may travel where he pleases; the grèénback dollar,is as eoofi as anj' nation's on the globe. What has been the result of ïbe policy of resumptions? Alany thought as the day of resumption approached, that despondency and bankruptcy would follow. It has been an atlvauuige and prosperitx^ throiighout our entire land. I am told your shops in Manstield are again in operation, antl it is so ever^'whure. The re.sull. is, labor i.s plentiful and capital finds secure and safe investment. AVhy, in ]S[cw York just the other dav I heard of ¡ill maniser of schemes being originated by capita li9t.9 for the investment t>f capita! that had been idle since the panic. The public credit is now better than in the history c>f the countrj'. Strange to say since th%' ls.1 of January there has )x;en .sold |i7r)0,0(M),000 of four per cent bonds. These were .sold at par in gold, and the last million and a half sold at a premium of one half per cent. We have saved lo the peo-  thc^- intenti to do itV B.y as laws are ordinarih'mac-sent a bill whicli provides for the p.ay of the army and congressmen. If it would .stoj) the'pa.yof the congressmen I would not object. "[Applause.] There would be no objections to the passage of this bill, but the bill calls for the repeal o the election law's, and thus they present it to the president for his signature. Some times il is just and right to add such measures to ap|)ro!jriation bills I have seen it done mau3' limes. When this is done for the purpose of «¡ding aud sustaining the independent depiirtments of Ihe go'vernnient, I agree to it. Cougress said to the president : "You consent to the repeal of the election laws, or we will make 3'oi! no appropriations." The president has .sent back one of their bills -wiHi his objections, and he has the right to do so. Now m.v countrvMuen, I do not believe there is going to "be an.y serious trouble iu regard to the appropriation bill. The gtH)d sense of both jiarties will sec thai the position of congress is WTon.g, .-ind the next election .you will make con.gress see its error b.y your vote. 1 have referred now to all lli'e 'points of which I wish lo speak, f think lioth democrats and reiiublicans wili agree with me that this .government of our, this national .government is supreme in all its power, "this great government lor the people by the people" is above the states, even above the greit stale of Ohio; it has ¡rower to tleclare war, make peiicc, make duties on imports and provides national courts, so that a citi'icn of one state can sue u citizen of antifher, and all the powers of the nation are supreme and above those of the slates. An idea pre. vailed in the south that Ihe states had a right to sce.urc Ironi Ihc nation. "Wc went to war on this qnestion; w e sjienl millions of treasure, and sacrificctl thousands i.>f lives, but'camc oui of the conflict vict.ori-011« Vou "have a judiciary lo ticcidc all question.« that may arise beiween the states. It is important thai all these powers should lie kejit distinct. The election of mt;mbers of congress, the most, vital one of ihc power, should be. kept inviolate among the states. Bv a amènerai election law the member? of the senate, are selected by the legisla turc of each slate as it may ,«ec iii. the states have great .»ower which con-.oTess cannot inferiere wñth. ^Vhile senators ami presidential electors .o-e elected by the legislatures, membersof congro.ss are elected by fhe people. The future elections question will be the passage ol a fair general election bnv by congress providegfor fhe appointment sors or marshals selected front by the judiciaiy, who will see fair election is held, and th.it casts but one vote.  The seci-etarv discussed tins question for a few minutes further, wh' ii he closed and withdrew amid applause.  Richards, the Nebraska nuir<lerer, about whom so much has been said, was hnnged at Alinden, Kearney couuf\-. at 1:17 o'clock Saturday. He mounted the sc.iffold with, a steadj'step, and stood lacing the crowd of tivc"rity-five hundred peoj-de. Au in-closure had Leen erected on the jmblic square, a pen made of pine boards sixteen feet square, in which the execution -was to bo held, the law of Nebraska making a private execution necessary-. At noon Saturday a mob tore this shed do-wn, and the execution was made public.  which will ■f supervi each party that a free, ach elector  Poverty and Snffl'erii»«.  "I was dragged down with debt,poverty  and suffering for years,-caused bj' a sick  family and large bills for doctorih.g, which did them no good. I w^as completely discouraged, until one year ago, by the advice of my pustor, I procured Hop Bitters and cominenced their use, and in one month we were all well, and none of us have seen a sick dav since, and T want to say to all poor men, you caii keep j^mr families well a year with Hop Bitters for less than one doctor's visit will cost, I know it. A. vWkingmiui."  The «reatest »le.'»»inir,  A ."dimple; pure, harmless remedy, thai cures'e\-Brv time, and prevents disease by keeping tlie blood pure, stomach i-egular, kidnevs and liver active, is' the greatest blessing ever conferred upon man. ll*n> Bitters'is that remed.y, imd its pi-oiu-ietorii are being biessed by thousands thai have been saved and cured by it. Will you tr}' it? See oth«r oolum«.  .vi-- '  "nr-«.'V 'fe   

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