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   Danville Hendricks County Union (Newspaper) - July 22, 1880, Danville, Indiana                                 ' y " " T ^ ^  : Î  VOL. n - NO 25.  SBAT, JtJLT 22,1880.  $1.50 PER TEAB.  ' ^ r»  eRAIN BAfiS By le Bale,  . .fc .....  Walker Boots and Shoes,  HARTFORD BOOJS & SHOES,  And a Job Lot of  HEADY-MADE VESTS AT COST,  1  CRABBY  Dan-ville,  'S  Indiana«  Wall Paper,  WIITDOW  ■Bii ■-€■  -^rr-  WEST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE,  DANVILLE, INDIANA  Dealer in In«iira.ixce—  ;ifir»t-ChiS5 Companies Kopreseuted. ^ DANYJXLE, - ( r INDIANA. .  "" • julyl,3tn.  ■w. nsr. Xj^iciisr,  MANUFACTURER OF  CARRIAGES. BUGGIES,  C/2  o  ÛQ  > >  Z  Agricultura! Implements  Constantly on band.  11:»  i  RECEIVED  -o-  10 Bags Prime Rio i^oftce, 15 to 20c. 10 Cases Gloes Starch, 8ic.  3 Clusts New Gunpowder Tea.  S Cases N"ew Pine Apples, iSc  3 Cases Columbia Hiver Salmon, 20c. 3 Cases Fresh Cov« Ovsters, 10 &12ic.  Lake Salt, $1.25 Per Bbl.  SALT FISH AT COST.  Come and see zne. .  EH. HALL,  MAMMOTH TEA AND GROCERY STORIt  Moore's Iron Block, Danvill«. Ind.  once -  •  —The katvdids hav«^  ^-•v-fi-t-  —The complaiot  house" grows,  —Several book ville this week.  —-Attend all the'"^«rci Normal next week. .  —The "cool" exceedingly agreeable.; i .> '-L-S "^.  —Oar grocetyxnen amiwsii^T^f fine lots pf blackbeixi<  meat dar at Central Normal.  —Before j-ou go blackbetrying,-. read the Plaintield correspondence 2'"  —Remember the gziu^^Sisjnibllcau rally at Coatsvilld ne^.'^^u^y. ..  —The County Mescal Society Jield an interestiug session last Saturday.  —Quite a number of our citizens' attended the old Salem Keunion Inst Sunday.  —The Indianapolitans begin to appreciate the location of our town as a summer resort.  —The corrected figures make tlie population of Danville 1,015, an in^^rwae oi 600 since 1870.  —A heavy rain, accompanied by heayy thunder and vivid lightning visited us laat Monday moi-ning.  —Mr. Mathews, agent for K. L. Polk & Co., i^ canvassing Daiivllle for a State Gazettee and Business Directory.  —The wood cute of .Mbert. Gti Porter in the papers do tliat gentiewan great injustice. He is good,^"look-  ing. '  —The weather for the p^ ;^veral days has been cool and pleasàixt^i^uite a relief from the last  —Tn A brief article îîiMÎÎ^Woek's Democrat, in vrhich tbe i^,ite^tMjD3pts to criticise u^ there were three ^gÎkKiig mistakes.  —A number of the pioneers of the county were greatly disappointed at not meeting Rev. Joseph Tarkington at the Salem Reunion.  —The butcher shop and fi.xlure.s belonging to the Marsh Bros., were dis-IK>5ed of last Frids»y. Joseph Li. iiellei-s purchasing everything.  —A disreputable ca->o from the country up before .Squire Nichuls for trial last Monday. The young man was bound over to court.  —Siilesville has a population of 307 ; Lizton, 300; Brownsburg, 607. The enumerators did not report the towns separately in all cases. They should have done so.  —Dr. Furnas brought to our oiKce yesterday, s<»me fine specimens of the Blood Good pear, and also some of the Osborne Summer. The trees of the Imtter, the Doctor sa}?, are blighting  badlv. «  —I.,et there be no interference ftt all in political meetings held by either party. -\li disturbance in the halls of the court house during meetings of all kindii should be promptly checked by the town marshal.  —We received a note yesterday from John M. Harrell, one of our subscribers in Ripley county, saying that J.ime.« Jackson, living near Versailles, took strychnine lasV Thursday night, îiom which he died ih«t next morning.  —A rare bird was eecn on our streets this week, namely a Hancock negro. We understand that some of our Democratic friends have taken him under their winj^ and be will isoon address the public in behalf of the MiliUry Chief-tiin. Glad of it. The Democrats are badly in need of home speakers.  —We have "been a«ked of late, why the graduating classes at the Normal go to Indianapolis for their music and their programmes? cannot t«ll.  We know that Danville bw tkillful mosicians and good printing offices, and we believe that our yoang friends could do just as well, if not better, by patron-idng home enterprMC.  —B, G. Little!, of Carteisbtufg, has btulli a new and very conrenlent grain hoi^ Trhieh we had thé pieaioire of lookÎDg thVouglT last Saturday. It is a[3>proacbed by elevated drives and the bins are high enough to load the cars ifith eMc. It ipeaks well for that town.  Such a house is badly needed .in Danville. Mr. L. b buying 1,000 bushels per day.  —^The concerts of Prof. Heine at the Court House last Fwday an<l Satui^y nights were not well attended. Their merits were fine and they deserved large audiences. Prof. Heine is a genius in music, and can Irandle any in-stsument with skill. His wife and blind daughter, and Miss Rittenhouse are all masters of their parts. Our citizens who did not-attend missed a rare treat.  —Mr. John S. Craig, of Los Angeles, California, had been visiting here some two weeks, when on last Sunday evening he concluded to capture one of Dan-ville's-belles. He accordingly did so, selecting as the person, Miss Frankie Harper, and the couple were duly married at the residence of Mr. John Mes-ler. Rev. G. P. Peale ofilciating. They will make their home if» Cidifornia. The UxioN" wishes them the full fruition of their new departure.  —A large orchestra is being organized to assist in the music at t':l^ State Sunday School Convention. Persons coming from abroad are requested to bring violins, Hutcs, cornels, clarinets, etc, and join the orchestral accompaniments. The music will be under the direction of Prof. C. Hopkins, of Kokomo, Ind., assisted by Profs. W. A. Ogden, Ohio j J. A Fillmore, Cincinnati; J. H. Rosencraus, Illinois; W. T. Giffe, Logansport; J. H. Glover, South Bend; C. C. Cline, Louisville, Ky.  —A severe smash up occurred on the Vandalia road last Thursday morning at North Belleville, five miles south of this place. The early train was passing at the rate of forty miles per hour, and the engineer, Nick Dodson, saw-that a switch was wrong, and immediately applied the air brakes, but was unable to prevent serious damage. The engine, postal car, express car and baggage cars were smashed up and piled up in an almost indiscriminate mass. The regular passenger coaches and sleepers were injured but little. A tramp stealing a ride on the postal car wiTs fataily injured. ' The engineer bad one leg badly broken, and Mr. Hollen beck, the Adams E.xpress Messenger, was badly bruised. ' The cause of the accident seems to be that a sleepy switchman set the switch wrong just before the passenger train arrived.  —The commencement e.xercises at the Normal are coming, and the young man and the maiden are busy in the preparation thereof. The merchant tailor plies his work day and night thai the graduating suit of the young Atlas, who is soon to stand before the listening multitude and say his piece and then go forth to carry the world on his shoulders, may be fault.ess in style and fitting qu.-vHties. The busy sewing machine of the dress-maker rattles away with stitch upon stitch, that the maiden fair may shine forth in gay attire as she appears in public on the stage. The anxious mother and the fond papa, too, are preparing tor the occasion, with expectations great; their parental hearts swell with pride as they think of their son or daughter receiving from cLossic hands, the coveted sheepskin. Commencement season is a happy time to students and their friends. May it be enjoyed to the fullest extent by all.  —It must have been the "brieHess barrister," as Ed. King, the former editor of the Democrat use to call him. who presided over the editorial page of that {»aper two weeks ago, when that wonderful criticism on the U-niox appeared. It was cbiirged that we had used "Nobody knows nothing." It seems that the above mentioned gentleman, smarting under a playful criticism of ours on his wonderful speech, predicting Garfield's election, determined td find something against us, and looking through our files he discovered in the number issued on the 1st day of last January, the above sentence. It was a local item all of which read as foUowii: "There is some faint talk of orange blossoms in certain directions about town,but nobody knows nothing." MiraliU t^en, what a discovery! The aforesaid b. b. had us, didn't he ? Sharp boy! The above in the connection Qs^ meant just what we wanted it to mean and was written with quotation marks,, bat through the fault of the printer and p^f reader they were left o£ Bat when a man is hard poshed for a criiieiBm, a typographical ei^ willdojiut«s well as anything dse. Hedewrree s chroeok however, mad  we have a very suiiaile one already selected. Call and get it. It is done up in the hiffhesis(yh of the art.  Gravel Koads.  Well, what about those gravel roads that there was so nauch talk about when the mud was unfathomable. Talk on that subject has quieted down. The reasons are apparent. First, the dirt roads are good and travel is excellent everywhere, and the people are adopting the philosophy of the man who s.-vid when it rained he could fix his leaky roof and when it was not raining he did not need to have it fixed.  Second, the farmers are very busy and it is hardlj- time to do such work. We hope however that the matter will not be permitted to go by default, but that the two new companies formed will put their roads through this season. Nothmg will help Danville more than these contemplatetl roads.  ~pers6nals7  Mr. Walter Allen, of Greencastle,  spent vSunday in Danville.  /  Mr Jim Matlock, of Indianapolis was in town the first of the week.  Miss Lou McPhetridge and Miss Florence Powell visiteti at Plainfiokl last Monday.  Dr. M. J. Williams, of Stiiesvillo, was in attendance at the Medical .Society, Tuesday.  Miss Minnie Smart, of Jeffer.sonville, is visiting the family of Rev. 11. L. Dickerson.  Ed. Yelton, who is attending school at Indianapolis, spent a few days at home recently.  Mrs. Orphia Todd and master Harry Todd, of Garden Grove, Iowa, are visiting relatives here.  Mr. and Mrs. Shaw returned to their home in Vevay after a pleasant visit of ten days in Danville.  Mr. and Mrs. George Harding and their frisky little son Glenn, are visiting at Bellefrttintain, Ohio.  Mrs. David Gibson and her little boy, of Indianapolis, are stopping at the Laureate House this week.  D. J. Woodward, the buggy man, was in Danville this week. Dave has to comeXack occasionally.  Mr. Lan C. Matlock, of Indianapolis, came over to spend .Suuday with his family, who are visiting here.  Mrs. Minerva Steele and son Charlie, of .Jacksonville, Illinois, are visiting in the family of Dr. H. G. Todd.  Rev. W. A. Smith, and Rev. G. W. Switzer, of Greencastle, were visiting Presiding Elder Colvin yesterday.  Mrs. M. A. Walker and son, of Indianapolis, have come to our town to keep cool during the heated term.  Dr. Geo. H. F. House, of Pecksburg, called on us this week and left his professional card for the Uniom. See it on first page.  Mr. Milton Henton and Uncle Jesse Matlock attended the old Salem reunion last Sunday, and met several of the old-timers there.  The wife of Rev. A. Fitz Randolph, of Tecumseh, Nebraska, is visiting her sister, Mrs. C. A. White. Her daughters, Beatrice, Geraldine and Gertrude, acconpany her.  We were glad to receive a friendly call from Dr. Heavenridge, of .Stilesville, last Tuesday. We knew him years »go at school and studied with him the first lessons in Algebra under old Prof. Lar-rabfc. Tlie doctor is a clever fellow and we like hiui well all save his politics.  Miss S. E. Yourjg, the f.ccomplisbed music teacher at the Normal, enjoys the reputation of being one of the best teachers in the country. At Plainfield, where she has been teaching for almost three years, she has a large class of scholars who are improving wonderfully. The people of Plainfield appreciate her work, and say she has bnilt the musical profession in that town. Miss Young b in every respect a lady, and deser^'es all the praise awarded her by those with whom she is acquainted.  INOIANAPOl^IS MARKETS.  -nre«ocwUp, July 21.  STOCK.  HOGS—»4:50 to  cattle—Prime »hipping Steers $4:50 to $4:75. Prime botcher «teer» and heifer* §4:23 to  SHEBP—120 lbs asá upward, $3:75 to $4:10; 100 lbs and BpwMTd $3:25 tof3.-T5.  OBAiy.  WHSAT—Ko. 2 aew red 93Uíe bid, asked.  For Jaly, Xo.2 aaw red 92e bid, f4e aaked.  Aacast. Ko. 2 aew red 86e bid, ftnt half Aagast SSMe bid. asked.  COBN—Ka. 2 Whita 39e bM, So. 3 SSehid.  FARMERS  Of Hendricks County,  To Danville, where the Highes Market Price is paid, and then  Bring Your MONEY  E.  -TO-  And Exchange it for Dry Goods at the lowe.st market price. "  Geo* JH, :tloii»c, >1, I>,  Physician and Surgeon,  PECKSBURG - - - - INDIAN ■•r.-r-  All cali» promptly attended to. 3t..  jQr J. JB. Harlan «Se Son,  DENTISTS.  Danvllic.lmi. Nitrons Oxid«"Gas »ilruiniatered •«>)- »n deiirv'd. OQlc« in Uoman'a buildiug up st«ir<). 7-13  Q E-.FARABEE, ]VI. D. PHYSICIAN and SUKGEON,  Estep's Block, Danrille, Indian.v  Ç^ofér ífeTaylor, Attorneys ai Law,  Dscvillc, Indiana. OjTii e over Pose OiKce. ("•. ! •ïciioiis and notorial work prutiiptly a;tend.?a to.  ^^ Xj. Stanley,  Attomey.ULaw, 2\otary Public and Collecting A^ent.  Coat».<vn)e, Ind., wil! aitenJ lo the practic ard crl> l«tions belore Juitict?.'" ot tlie Peace, and also in :J .j •wircail Court of this and adjomin;;counties. • 2-1  Qharles Foley,  ATTORNEY AT LAW,  DAN^LLE, - ES'DIAXA  Practicca in the Court» of Hendricks and ad joining coantiej, nnd the Supreme Court u the SUte. Offioe, north side Public Square.  Xov. l:}.lS7i-'.  j^/Jarshall Toclcl, .IBSTllACTOR OF TITLES,  Danviile, Ind «nn. Offcp ?n County TI<»<:«r.lpr'a t;. lie». Tb» title to aioi* than fcc-balf of tbv teal ci -t»le iu IlcaUriclis cooatr 1» defective.  INSURANCE xVGEHT.  Danrillle, Ind., represent« the British Amer • can. Western, of Toronto, and the old trica cotnpaay, THE OHIO FARMERS', of Lo Roy, Ohio, organized in 1848.  gteele & "Whyte,  MARBLE DE.1LERS. '  EMt rftle I^aare, Danville. Ind has on hands ItoJan.Tenneisset: and other Aroerlcau marW^ Tomb «tones inail© In auy tiesJgn on Kbort notice. ' .. ¿.^g.  T. N JON.ES  DEaLca tx "Watches. Clocks, Sil-Tcrware, Spectacles Jk IFiiie Jewelry. £ast Side Poblic Square, DAXTIIXE, IXD.  Btpatringof all kimdt ntatlg executed a*d lear-roMted. 5-13-1/4  i  Si   

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