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Covington Peoples Friend Newspaper Archive: January 19, 1850 - Page 1

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   Covington Peoples Friend (Newspaper) - January 19, 1850, Covington, Indiana                                 /  mm  ïttEPEO.FRIEP  ss i-UKUSHEU ìVììlY SATi;iiMAr MOKÌft.VG BT  SOLOIV TfrUiTlAN,  A.-Ìi» rURSISHSD T.; A'.'rÁ^CZ-l'ÁlVtí »LBMaU-I i:i.,-! -.T  CREDIT TER.MS PER .'hVJSZ^.H:  25 ¡r paid xvit};ir¡ three months; 1 50 " " " fix "  1 75 " " nine «'  " " twclvo "anil Ü SO will invarialilv be exacted when paynscDt is lìcgìccied uiiül the year expires.  Sixty ccnts in advance far eix raontiiB.  JL  □  The Song my IVIotbcr Sia;?«.  3t wci.-; the song :ny raolher ein^. And filfidir ¿o I list thestraiu, I never iibar it but it briaga 'J'hc vv;s;i to Luar it suag ajjain.  She broathcJ it to me long ago,  To 'üil ír:e to my baby rest. And II» g¡io inurmurud eoft «nd low, I sl";it in peuco upon her brosHt.  {)!;. f,'f ntlo f^vni^, tliou hr.Ft a throng  <.)i ûnçi'î tones within thy epull, I fpcl that I phnl! lovolh-.j l n;T, And fi'nr l lovc i))cc lur t"o wdi.  l"i>r thoiifrh Î turn to hocr thcü now.  With dotintr plance rf w^nn dylig!:», Ill aft'T yearn I kmr-v ti it iiow 'i'hy plaintive notes ¡aay diui tny Ki;,'ht.  l'iiTit m )tber's ToiC'^ --vV] then ho sill 1,  1 iiO:ir it taker dsi/ iiy i!ay— ]i Ro^iu'ietii like a ton::Mi:) ri'!,  ^ Üúilax ìlmBpafcx-^Dmocxatìc, ûîï^ "Orniti to ìltxm. ^grxntlíur^, CìUxatuxL Cfc»  VOL. 8. COVIIGTON, FOlINTAIIiCO. IND., JMUARY 19,1850. NO. 33.  building surrounded by trees, vices and flowers of exquisito beauty.  her hair raven cud glossy, and her form '.vfls thai of a licbe.  "Do you noto that buiiding," ho said, Tho former of iho two was tho gay "as iilso t.ho snriüll white cottage that est i!i company, and tho most brilliant in stands oil to tho right, and another of a similar c-haroctor standing a Utile farther to the left—for I have a story somewhat romantic to toll ycu conncctcd with ull of them, as also with their furnrjer inmutes."  My curiosity was now fuliy roused to know what he was aliout to rcvful. As  forced to joia io the general v>ico, when they saw a largo array of -nechanics upon tho ground, and tho talkd of buildings in actual progress. It was com-conversalion—but her lacguago was pleiod iu what appeared to tbem an in-evidently studied, and tho product of tho crcdiblo short space of time—and -was, brain—while tho sweet, timidly uttered i by the way. tho beautiful residence to  eve of being accomplished ; and with a thousnud fantastic visions whirling ihrough her brain, ono rose prominent above a!I others, and that was, iho beau-liful Eilen, the wife of Alvord. one of the richest, most accomplished, and hrii-iiant Uulies of the land ; nnd sudilenly  sentences of the other, lore in every syllable the unmistakable assuratice of coming direct from the heart. The one  Now,  which I callcd -«our attention, sir, comes th« romance  As yet no on« sad seen theotrner,and | spoko to nsako an impression—the other it was given out that ho would rnuke bis  "I ehall now passover the minor events, to the ere of the Kourih of July, which was to be an eventful night to the inhabitants of N--, for a frco invitation  had been extended to all; and at an early hour the groat hall of tlie limiijiion wan crowdcd with citizens of all grades, 'l'ho     Rates for Admrtisitig.      r on    ÙV>'KS    3 Mü'S    6 MO'S    1 r-R      One »quarc, Two 4t]unres.' Three «mares, Hiüf Column, Ooe Column,    t w i uo    3D  4 00  5 50 9 00  15 00    #4 Oír 6 00 8 00 15 00 25 00    lü «» 12 ÓO 25 M . 40 Ou     Forench insRrtioii o»er thre« week* ami Ie*stha'i llu-oii months. 26 cents n square will ba uddetl.  A squHve consists of 25(» em«—teo Ifne» Minion, and twelve Bou^oi». Nothing couDted lessthana tqpiarc- A fi-action ov«r a square i« » «0111016 ando half; a fraction orer a iquare & n i>»lf. 0 gquyre». andsoou.  Circuit Bod Probate Conrt, AdroiniftrBtaian »„^ other Ufcsl notices, mnit be paid in adyauce 01 thalr publication.  Forench insRrtioii o»er thre« week* ami Ie*stha'i llu-oii months. 26 cents n square will ba uddetl.  A squHve consists of 25(» em«—teo Ifne» Minion, and twelve Bou^oi». Nothing couDted lessthana tqpiarc- A fi-action ov«r a square i« » «0111016 ando half; a fraction orer a iquare & n i>»lf. 0 gquyre». andsoou.  Circuit Bod Probate Conrt, AdroiniftrBtaian »„^ other Ufcsl notices, mnit be paid in adyauce 01 thalr publication.  ^^ Oppicb on Main street, north-west, of the public eqiiare. in the buibUn^ hi>re-toforo loiown ae the "Covington House."  MR. Alvvrd:  •"Ut^rfir-. I feel most highly ii.-iiti-rc;! ijT ih«/rp-Ixiaiiùùil neti , whiTiin you it'i  , . , , . , , i 1 ■ 1 ' cr-'!iun ofIxiaiiùial net. , wlu-riin you i. |  felt what sììe Uttered, und witliout do-; appearance nml hko possession on tho i , , , .¡^ i» r. rly.Jtursir. 1  K'yjn. The one W.TV fornioJ Cot a rr.i.U ' Fourth of Jul v—the dnv appointed far ;,yot: : !h, T --U; f.iri'urau.r. .tiisa wtiich wuii a door;  ! hearted coquette—tho other for a warm ; iho marriage ofilihn Bordon and Charles l 'li ^ -i-i u-v iay-< U- to., l^.-hiy i-y r«- millionairo -a-hìì ti  ; <■! !■• iii;^ a ■■ .'i:; iVoiii  J Knt tr'jiibb.',« ere  ;! i-u;!sc? i'lay.  the stage moved on again, tho stranger  turned to me, and. after a moment's j hearted coquette—tho other for a warm ; iho marriage ofilihn Bordon and Charles pause, as of hesitalion how to bcfrin, pro-! hearted woinaa, that couid love until i Martin. A report\;£o bocamo current,. cocdcd with bi.s Story. Although 1 can-1lioath. Such were tho rival beaui:es of! that Ernest Sundeland Alvord wasRi,,,,, not Telato ilexact'v in his words, I shall tlic viiiaci'-'uf N— endouvor to j)rescrvo the spirit of it as: wiiich 1 5;sctil;. and  ¡much us po<ss!b!c~and yet 1 shall ea-;thc former of Ellen Borden, the latter j crease tho curiosity t^ soo tbis paragon; |.. .-p,, k.^ì^"  jtirely fail in giv;ng tho earliest, that ; Mury Ihiiivcrs. : particularly with tha. clns.s of females  jbcautiru! accent, and forcc of point, if I | "^Vstlii!l tiuco months after his arrival, | wljo consiilered themselves, or were con-  apartment wats splendidly decoratod with halting, sho seated bereolf al the la^u, ^ ^„j paintings, and light-  and wroto the following noie : ^y j-j^.g „rrat ciiandelicrs, suspendcd  from the crìiinp:. At tiie far end of iho hall wa« a slijihlly elevated iilatforni or y curi)cted, at tho back of throutrh which ih« ^reat millioiiairo -ivaii to n!>near, and ho introdu-i ■ yi.itrs. \f. | (.^'d tu tln.' ¡-.iiblic; and conseijuenily ali eyos  s;,ry,.nr ki;. 1 Ì!a:ì:ì!ì..u i.your tiirned in liiat diroctiofi. Ad yet no  rr:i!:!;iii n; ijj i'ii' Fourth. ;iiui li;isiC von tiiv.t I , n ___  . , .• , , . , ji . „ . , .„ . ono had seen Mr. Alvord, aithouch ali sverò  , at ilio timo 01, voung, hanosome, inmarried man—and i s.'i;iU i oms! tra- ¡n.-n. «r,;i '.t iin-soi iiic  ■ ' ' 'li  y boro the names, j this, of course, tondcî not u iütle to in- ju>!b.<-riVH- ronio^  Alió then this heart, ti "i Will faui an -t '  !i  i ir that it bad U"t i.n'd  '■ong, ' may so erqircss it, :;y v, i;;ch Ise made ov- Charles Martin began to mingle in socio- : sidered, eligible to tnier tho, to them, i-:iclî.  8atipilei ho wats uow in the building; for an elcgant carria'^o, witii tour wliiio hor-ticg ricìilv cciiiipari<)oned, had bet'n tcon l)iit " After readingthe ù)reitnìn<: some ttro j a ehnrt timo hcforo ti hall al llie duor In or three Kìlcn folded and super- the rear, and a gentleman tu idKio tlicrc-!  Upon Ellen, who trembled and grew deadly pale; "1 will not upbraid her, for if I judg« her proud heart arig^ht, sorrow and regret, enoiiirli will bo her portion. Thi.s night waa to have been our wedding nJght; but herp, in tho presence of many witnesse:<, she has again refused mo. Notwiihsland-inff this, T am not mistaken, the weddin-r will still take placo—but with another bride;" and dcsccndin<i from the platfurm, ho approached Mary Danvers, who could scarcely credit what she saw, and whispered a few words in her car.  "When you wore simply Charles Martin," she answered in a tremblins voice, "I consenlod—but now 1 feo! t urn unworthy to become your partner."  "lla! hero is iruo love," lie replied, und with gentle fnrca ho led her forward upon tho stage, whore a minister shortly nppeart'ii, nnil joined ihom in the holy bonds of wedlock, in the presence of the  T.Vill \vi<!i it coii''i ;; :ovi; U'tig.  ■t Wi:li.  Scry part tei! with wQii lorful tirert. i ty—..V r.otwithstaniHng scandal had star- ' untried state of matnmony. Even El-j "Sevorai years since," he began, "on ' ted some reports not favorable to his carli-' Ion, as sho proudly surveyed her fino I -  THE ECCENTRIC LOVER;  »jV. ,  Thp Rivai Iìeautt<'*i.  Hit.-Í.NKTT.  scribed it with great care, und j:ave it to  111! servant, wlio, with a graceful bow,  . immediateiv withdrew—-vvhilo EUeii re-afino picasunt rnjrning," in the month or history, yet his upright behavior had form and faco in 0 mirror, .sometimes ruminate on her good fortune.  of I'ccembcr, a young man, some twon-^ tcp.ded much to silence iicr lying t'lngue, fell a pang of regret that sho had thus evening of the same dav,  ty-tivo years of ngc, svas seen entering ; an ;, alniost contrary tu his expectations,; thrown herself awav, as it wore, by en- Qjj^^les Martin called 0!i E'lon, and found  the town '>f X-, wttii a srua'.l bun- , he ¡Vut/i wherever ho went a coriiial re- ' ga,.:;ng herself to apoor, hu.aiblo me-  c-.'plicn. Parties were occasionally giv- ichiuiic—andat times.1 strong lem[>lalion  I largo assembiaj^o, who, aftorthc cere  mony was over, mado the very wall.i tremble with a universal cheer of saus-faction. After this came supper, and nil niuht. The  V j.M.MEi;^  I lie under hisurm. und a [¡ack on his back i '  —the former co.'itaining his extra ciolh-!<j;i. to ^vhiC iDg—the latter, a conitiiclo set of shoc-i maker's tools. As workmen of his trade  ■ tnat  !  tn !i,  Wt' T'  t:  c : 11 ; ■ 5ly Sr ir.wii in t; n rail r nc w, ;  nnce 01- n st .:  ttif!'' wat < !  gv -M.-.U V,;.': : w ..:,', OS ; o : ih,3 í-k-. tell. í > :ia crtv ff  T". b,» • ri v\ :i'i  ¡were somewhat scarce iti -X-  an  ..nriri d onre uj-: n a tirno, ito be "11,1,1 ni I ;:,.iYciist!Cäorder for a ccrtaia kind u  1 i.ad  almost always a \vot;Id come over hcrio bronk this piedgo, guebt, and ever, apparently, a favorite : and once more to free—lo try hor pow-(iHc—in fact, if it so chanced he was not ; crs of fascinatiuti upon thia young, haad-:>re?orit, imm-.diatc inq'iiry was made as : some mechanic.  to ihc wherefore, and many a gay lass | "Poublless his heart is freo," she was soen to loo!; g'oomyvn the occasion. | would reason to herself, ".ind why may .'it one of ti;cse ¡lar'i':?, he met and rc- |l not succeed in caplivaling him ? I tim r.jüon. ! ly found cnip'oynioüt. lie was evidcf.t-; ccived an inírcijcticn to the rivai beau-i handsome in person, havo fino talents \ ily n mati of cunsi j-jral;'.' éducation and | ties—for so the l^-o 1 have nair.cJ were ■ and conversational powers, and withal  ,, v. i some talent, a!!-!, from manners. ; teriivc'J in lliO vilia^o. Of an ardent i a manner of plcnsinti tho raost fasiidi-  ïi;-' fr^jin tlic shoe had just been receivci by tho pria-  , clîi nia¡:-  c:p3¡ manufacturer tuorc, he very rcadi-  ^¡ün,*^^■hc:lcvcr bo ch'>OHe to i xcrt them,  ! ' r '!Ylf:; j:i t ; ::ntry. iMV • i.:l! ua i f.jur. tnof.g  ■s !,r \ \ !::v Cv^:; .  i'h'-r Í : ¡^.--iv::.^  ■•:!■;■ y kj frunt of me, er^ I t':_''.ir<: rvT.iC'what hi i fir tibovo liiat usually accorJ -d to one ot ,i ut tul;;- the ¡ i;,- j his Station—in other words, as sornoc::-  his Tcception colder than ever—in fact, sho would .scarcciy Kick ut him.  "\Vhcrcioro is it F/ilcn," be nskcd, "that you treat me thus cni Iiy !''  "Because. Mr. Martin." biio answered, bitterly,."your cmiipany is no longer agreeable to me. and I wish your engage-m'ent broken oil"."  "Certaioly, if you wish it," Iv» replied, "but what have I done tooirjndyou I Beware, Ellen, thtit you do notiiing rashly ! for you must bear in mind that I hnvo lov<;d vou sincere! v. and fur your-  frotn a!ul enter tho mansion. rrt.',<eatl_T i a band of muHicious app.Mveii, and struck up tho national air of Haii Colaiiibia.  "Among tlie ."pectators, and near the •tago. Blood Ellen Bordon. richlv a>ui taste-j tally habited, und jrazin- amund with a! ^«^y» ^'»e carriage and four wlnto proud look, that made her an object of re-! horsos bore awuy the millionaire and his mark to almost every ono proteiu. Near her stood Charles ."Uartin, and leaning 011 his ana, Mary Danvern. As the eyes uf  jora:; <.  some ta.cnt. a!!-!, from easy manners. ; ternicd in iho village. Of an ardent i a manner of plcnsiiig utid ratl'.ur bnliiaut p.r.vcrs of cor.vcrsa- ; tempcraniont, Charles ."^iartin had a ten-! ous—and why might I not succecd in  ior rcL'^rd f ir tlie opposite stx—particu- I winning him, wero it not for this hated 1  larly thove bearing the frn-lle stamp of; and foolisii engagement with a wander- ..j nothing rashlr," sho answered, Iseauty—and. as a conscfiucnce of this, 1 ing mechanic whom nobody knows ! And ^.¡th • "and 1 will thank vou,  bo.........................  sout) Iccainc "vi i:nt. to c'oso obsorv- j uiut ho iiad L-ocri tnuch in secieîv  bcth Eiien ani Mary made a dcep im-| then, what a triumph it would bo over | ^^ rno Miss Hordon.'un-  pression tipou hishcart; nor was it pos-• t!io inhabitants of N-. nnd what & ! ¡^ss in v namc ihouid bo changod."  I  h»: li. Ibs rt r,'.  V  I-1. '.V.  (•■il i. 1 ; '. ar.-> liirrï vv r  .. t  1  S n.: \ 1 5;  Í- 'Ì.C !;i;rt\-;.ve w;r<türs.— s'- r^thc t:.l!. u;  u:. i fri- 1 fr.'::i íu:yt!i.ng ¡r.;i.v<;'. li. " t'ves \v::v black: -a-i í:!:'»w:.-e hair—tito  ;,icy a: i ; ho-i'.í-rs. 11,s íVa-  Siiilc fur him, on u first interview, lo de-í talk it would mako both privately and in! " ¡¿ tlr.s tho girl I bava loved,"  ciJe ".viiicli óf tho two had the asccnden- ; tlio ¡aiLlic prints—und -with what ea:<c I g^rjiy cy. As a stranger in a small village is _ and splendor i could live, and look down whence ho came—and délicate hint.'; %vcro ' gcneraiiy u favorito with the ladies, par-' upon thoso who toil for ilu-ir daily  i pressed it, that he had seen bolter days. Matiy were llic '-n :airio3 among tîic i mero curious us to wiio ho was and  tiirown v>ut ::i hl'í presene that ;t would bo vcrv  agreeable  0 c;: ct  fl.r the  iiculariv if there is an air of mystery ; breaa I" and as tins gouien vision grew ar.d rcri;a!;ce conncctcd with him, so it ■ more und moro upnn the mind of this i  J, sadly, "'to whom 1 Imvo pledged my vows, and was pledged in return  persons present to know s.>inethi!;p of was ^vilh tr:0 young mechanic—and ho | vain, proud girl, it took more tlio form !iis cartv history—-but whether he un-^ found wlierever he turned, ara.mg tho , of reality, until at last, her imuginatioa  ; derstood tisem or nut, he never muJe an ^ opposite sex, bnitht eyes to grow bright- 1 to'd her,  I  t(■;•',r. atia, í^C'.,:i ¡n  tnarh'c. 1 aliusion tu the pasi--and ihtahis natno 1 or en his apriruach, and sweet voices to | ••!• v,\.s :icrc-;"i iv::i:h was ¡nt r.U n tîrram  ft:tvc ;>tyii i art-slically i"i^'^s simply Ciiaries Martin, comprised ^ u'row m-rc twecl us they gave hini a | And sho already began to deviso means  > nnr-r;;:natcly. his akin ^''--yp'ca^ w-e!come. Eut of all he saw, ' of breaking of}" wimt considered n  ' ! !  u- ;)■•. , ' .-.v d<.tr.i i. il tVom their . furiosity is n 1 usy j.-i that never leaves ! two only fixed his attention—I'.ilen Dur- , foolish ongagcijicn'. U'b kv. Motwitiistan iiuz this, liowev- anything undone wluc'i may bo couvert-, don and .Mary Danvers—and, soc:i after, j ".Alartin, wiio continued to visit her i-X'>rfr-- ion .<f h'>s coimtenanco 1 ^^d into food f^r iier gr^rcdy eppctiio--und | he commenced paying visits to cach—| regularly, Ibund, to his regret and nior-  rr.  t X ! r o nud ^ bricui  an 'ISilvU;: that, t'. ¡ncl.í '1 M  CM V < ' !.  r"íni Iv'i ■ li .-•u'- : J ¡:Í;k: W'-rr  an 1 \ - b'l-  . tv;;,a tuo t !:cf»j>f"n t;:a  •1 'U T.? was S : t ) U'.krsta!  Î  Oil. n^i.no ! there is. tlu're must be. soino nii.^tako ! Tell rne. I'lllen — I beg your pardon, .Miss Ilordon—what is tiie cause | of this coldness V  "I will,"said Ellon, with Hashing eyes, "Mr. Martin, you aro a ¡>oor, unknovi'n mechanic,'" nnd sho let her voico fall with emphasis upon the latter w.jrd— "and Ellen Bordon looks for something higher."  "And Eilen Bordon shall look in vain," he answered, in a deep, heavy voice, that  Ellen fell upon the two, her üp curli".! witti a look of scorn, und »ho was about iiiovin;x away, when Charles .Martin apjiroacliod her. and in a cahn voicc, yaid--  "Do you still refuse to marry me, Ellen!"  "I dol" sho answered, tartly. I wed no common mechanic"'  ""Vou hear:" said Martin, turning some of the bystandort—refuses me; tliid wae to have been our u-eddiii;,' night;" and retnrning^lo 5iary, he whii'i'?rc,i a few words in he- car, and diiiappcarcJ ia tho crowd.  "When tho band ccased playiug 'Hail Columbia,'a gentleman came iunvard on tho .«tace, nnd announced that Mr. Ernest Sunderland Alvnrd would siiortly make hia appearar.cc. Tiio annouDcoiuciit was yrcot-ed with thunders of apidaus^e, which was onlv silunced by a now pral of nuisic from the band. All waa noa- ¡iii.shcd us thu house of (Icalh—not a per.-iou moved—whilo ma  ny held their breath with au.-ciety, and fitrain'd their eyes to catch the fjr$l glinipao of I'.ie, to them, great personage. For soma little time they woro kept in fn«i-ponse, with their eye« riveted upon tho door, when it slowly swun^ back, end there was a general whisper of—'Ho conic.-'! JIo comet' What was their vexation and chagrin, however, when instead of tho great 31r. Alvord, the humble Mr. .Martin walked forward. Although he was a favorite in the village, yola general hie* of disap-jirobatiun greeted hid appearance on tho pre.sont occasion. Apparently without hcarii.g the murmurs of dissatinfaction, he look his elation on the extreme front of tlie platform, and rjuielly folding his arms  V ¡a tl.c l^•■.VL•r iip, and : feet to nvovc Clrarli s .M .\rt:p. to acknowl-' lercsi'; i iv.m, but in manner so opposite, pasted long, ;;:id «'as brought to a ^ Yoy Jespiso nic, not for myself, but for upon hi.s breast, stood and caiiniy gazed With tiiat -rue.' and fuilne;.-s ^^ c-ointrudict the various ri'porls fa- 1 tb.at n<.'ither scemtd perfect witliuulthe í terminus in tho following manner. nn' avocation—and because I am pof.r. upon the as.scinbly, until the music had  lliS ! vorai 1> or oil;., rv. ;se tu li.s farmer histo- ' .rualülcutions of the other—and yet ho j, ^^^ ^^^ j j rich'as this young millionaire, ceased; when tho genilenian who had ap-  Tiioc. iK^tvcvcr, rull. 1 on--the Icll if cith.:r were away, the other would ! J I i,„ow now iilis vour pcared to announce the coming of d«r. Ab  iKlc f )." t i ti.i;  n t::ai in the | i« th, prc-'-'ent instance, iiio labored hard : with wiiat liesifzn he scarcely knew him- jtiiication, a coldncss in ii-.r manner to- i almost startled her. while his dark eye un^ ¡iccuiiar-l^nd long tu satisfy it, but without sue-| s.if, lo dcciiio w hieb of the two he p:e-j wards him, and a petuhmcy wì¡c.^cv(«r | seemed to pierce her very s.)ul. "El-— wiiiic tho ^ Scandal, too, own dr.:;:!Hcr of cu-' fcrrcd—but lliis was not so ca.^iiy deci-: he addressed her, whicli grieved and | ¡g,,^ ! leave you ; I, who ofil-red you a  it, gave ' ri^sity-.-ufK-n ibrwarito nshistldcd: fir the dignifed lc..k and elegant, troubled him exceedingly—the more so, ; Jj^art as true as ever beat in breast of  tiie tic'ti.rr d:i?:v;---an Ì. 1:1 the I new : conversation of Eden, was aUvays coun-: as ho could not account tor it, and sho | nian. I leave you; but do not curso I'-ta 1, ihe d.d i;.ilf:i:l to-^rfcirm he r i tcractcd by tho swoct grace, luodcsty t wbuld givo !:!m no cx¡i'anution. Batliisjvou, for woe enough will follow, and lin e,-in, atid chin -'-cu^iome ] part: i^ut iMuthiT ha-I the ej"-, au 1 warm tidings of Mary. Both in-¡ suspense of anxiety to k:iow tho cause j .j^ys of anguish, and sleepless nights, ¡a '  ■ r-W C'.U;. Ui: Í ^v.tu  ìli;;!":)  iüt'-'loct, c:).  lovoly bride to Boston.  "Such sir," cuncUidod the Stranijer. "is my story. Is it not ft romsiniic one!"'  "It is indeed." I replied, "but what became of tho parties ul'terwardr'  "Ellen ikudon, witii all her high notions, ut last married a iKior mechanic— and what is mure a drunken one--ni)'l only a year since, he died in poverty t'c misery, and she went hoim; to her pii-ronts. .Mvord and bis lady still rosiif'« in B ,'Ston, und he has never IkuI causai to regret his union with ÄJary Dan-vors.""  "I presume from the details you have given, that you know the partios?" "1 have seen them," he answered. "By this time it was already dark, and wo wore rattling over tho pavomonts df Boston. I'resently the coach paused in a spacious street, beside an elegant >nan-■sion, and the stranger «lighttid. As ho did so, ho handed mo his curd, and bogged mo, if 1 had leasure, to give liitn a cali. It was too dark for meto rend Uio name then—but when 1 arrived at the Jlotel, I did so—and, reader, you may judge my surprise, on beholding, in clear characters, beautifully engraved,  Ernest SuNDEiiLAt^o Alvord. Ilo was, then, himself, iho eccentric hero of his ÜWU romantic story."  nv whi  very rc'ular, ''y-  wiiciiL-vc-r lio spono.  t:-V î jr some vcars 'avcc;it;un---unt;i  It was in tho nr;:iih of May, and El-1 Were I as rich as this young millionaire, ^ ^ !en v>-,is silting by licr window, engaged i whoso imngc I know now flis your  young mechanic si. adily pursued his ; content him. But all quandaries | at so;uc ncedie-work, pondering over her j thoiights, you would rash into my arms,  lai aai Ccri-_ have u terminatiin. and at la^t iiis t^^^ci-1 dream, when t^ knock Z tho door! Out you, lor an unprincipled, proud  •nnua  !■: t u Í1 V  the hu:;ian fico ;:i al! ä:s 1were torcevi to wauùur OÙ iu scardi  i  ' •a ¡n Uli gr.iüe3 ol t-ocic-  it aiK-ther victim.  cenerai 1  '■I:i ti-e two cottap'T'S I pointed out tp  rast, t-varic'.:  iv. uü 1 I iiavc töuiid it, as a (h,:!.:, î'îf litio page, or true ;:iii x ■^ei . 'u's character—but thero íü.ay  ■•V-cj.tions: or rather thero inr.y 1« those —but althou^jh ì> tii  sion was made: how properly j arou sed her, and oa looking out, she per-i ^voman ! but I will live to sec your pride  seen anon. ccivcd a servant in ricli livery, awaiting j humbled !"  I\Iart;n wns a great admirer of talent  an answer to Iiis summons. With  il-i "And I will live," answered Ellen,  t j a i V.  set n  :.,cr»irf, thai we arcai a luss where ior.o  t'.c-rc| res: ied, at tl.-.t timo, two i—nnd E.ivn, who perccivcd this, and ■ p-jtj^.mj. s,eart she flew to ihe ucor, and i ^^'i'-b a haughty, scornful look, "to seo :"ii p;ir:s--bot:i nìióut tlio age of i who was (i^-ti-rminod to make a c0n^]ucst ; j^coived a Lcautif.ii note, on scented pa-i yos^. P^'Oi"' miserablo viechanic, gladio  miuht be 1 over her rival, (for the true stato of liic ; p^r. addressed ia handsomo charactcrs, ^ ¿^^ss llie earth I walk upon."  "Eiiou^hl" cried Martin ; "Ellen, farewell !" and he rushed from the house.  "A few days from the last interview 'DCtwcen lUilen nnd Martin, tho latter  who so entirely disT'r fiom any wo havo is;.. . t? ie beautiful, yet li¡c- Ic-auty of, caso vas already whispered about the ' »¡¡s^ I'.llca Bordon. Overwhelmed  b :u resembluiscc! to that of the ^ viiia;ie, that the young tnechunic was 5^,j.priso and joy, she hurried back.  vord, again stepped forward, and waiving his hand to command eileuco, ia a voico  clear and loud, said— 1 1 . i ir -i  honor of Mussulmans, ' said 1, "oiler  Worth ol n-JTcw's Prayer.  Tho country uijound was cultivated with the grain cal|id dra, und there was every prospect of favorable harvest. "God be praisod."iaid the Kind, "for his bou n ty ; last yeaj, in truth wo had a sud prospect for tiii crop.s; and had nui tny master, ¿;oedj4Ai.n Selom E'Slowly ordered tho Jewsf God curse them! to pray for rain, 1 l^ow not what would have becumeof Gifl's crealuros." "Why  '•Ladies and geailcmen; tiio introducing to the good inhabitants of is'--, the pro¡)ietor of this mansion.  up their prayers J" "So tiiey did," im replied, "and for I'wcnty days and nights;  10 piare thcm.oT what jud^emenl to forin iotiu'r. 'uc u as fiir us tho ìily of t:;e ' strivicg to uccide betwccn the two) threw ! jj^ij ^[.¡j trembhn:^ hands, and vagua of their predominant trait.-?. Such was ) va'h y—vt t. uiil;ke tho hiy, ihcro wa:? oul uli ber powers. und Lecerne more at- ! visions of slie scarcelv kncw what, she •hi'rase w sth the individuai now before ' mi n.'t.r;:.;: nu Ll.nc.ss—cn the cont  rrjo—and nlth"d  int^vid  ghX^  now devolves upon your humblo «ervaut.—i"»^ 'y'ho banner ofeuch mosfjue was  In tho person hehio you, known among | atìiled a prayer wiitien by tho Fekeo you as Charles Martin, you behold Ernest j himself. Tho jirayors flouted in the Sunderland Alvordl" aud with a graceful face of heaven, but ell in vain ; for the  bow ho withdrew.  "Never did a simple annoui'cement thrill an assemblage as did the one just made.—  cnliro stranger, th^ro iat ,n ht-r cjiintenaucc a lo  rarv. :ractive than ever-v. hile:.hrv, who lM3- broko the seal and op.^ned it. Who can called upon Mary Danvers ; and after Men raid women stood gpeechless-dumb s okuf gan to ibel an ardent attachment lor ^icscribe the strange feelin-s which a^i-? the usual sdlutatious of the day were 1 with surprise and wonder-scarcely able ^  It r-. « it t 11 ft K f t 1 1 r>. r> SU 1 *  tbero was somelíúng that cxcitçd my CU-j tiri le, whicli se'med to say, 'I am supe- young Martin, bccamo mere timid and | ^jed iho heart of the proud girl, as she  finsity, interested my undorstanding to r;-r 1.» all r/.l.ers of my s^s'—aud yet j more reserved, whicii, ia bis inex'pcri-i read the fAllowin folu-.n. His dress was black; rich and t":;s haughty look did not ill bccomehcr, fenced eyes, left the balance io favor of ..r.. ¡;:.t f r. a::-;  -------------------li.b.<!.,farijier. and his decision was made -"lar <>;.. l r .  I I6Í0: Srs t'v.;« addrf«-  OirSnow, ice, rain, and roads have i  it;-;i>.  laioi to the State of Iowa'/f0''mTr"uY tlie"  r«d and green, which gavo st' a "rattier tiniquo appearaacQ. Cat caoagh of tho description.  As the stage rolled on over a smoqlh, dusty road, and as my fallow passengers seemed more inclined for sleep than colloquy, I determined in order to break the riuM monotony, and perhaps satify a curiosity, if possible, 10 draw the stranger siUo cooversation. A<»ordingly I ad-dre!5scd to him somo commoo^aco remarks, which ho only answered by a motiosyllablp, or slight movement of the hMd. Finding my efforts 10 engage iaim lO conversation useless, as ho appeared abstracted and buried ia profound tho't, 1 gave up in despair, and sinking back on tny sea:, let my own mind ramble far away to other days and other scenes.  About fiTo o'clock in tho afternoon we inssed througb the small, quiet Tillage 0f K-—^—; and as the coach paused a  ■____Mh. E. ; —A ;>rei>--;)fe of •of» Uuiiroad from D.ibuiU?  against our rcasv :; or inclination—even \âom caHod, and in the course of'tho cn- [-sn ¡ . ^•.■.i,-as birds flutter around, and anally sink 'suing spring, ho uiado au oiTer of his i'-'O-  "Mary, yog have heard of my engagement with Eiien Bordon t"  "Mary suddenly grew pale and her  ....... ^ , '■■'^oihiod as she answered—  suppff-.Me.; .•tt)ger & mo.-!ihc!Uioo, s>amn-; iie say.s, ■ cxc  prayers of the faithful are like music to Gild, who is worthy of all praise ; und therefore the Almighty, rejoicing in the sweet Sound of our supplication, grant-th not the desiroi of our prayers, for to credit their sense.-, until the stillness j ^¡shas us to continue still to pray, was again broken by Martin, or Alvord, as: ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^„nented with tho  I shall call hirn hencetorth.  ed Iiis font, arid hnmeiit'i! out  Ladies und gentlemen," lic began, "what you have just heard announced, is  true, I am Ernest Sunderland Alvord,  a^jfreij liie WHJ ai.'^J- ,  disgusting prayers of Jews and infidels than ho granted forthwith their petitions, in order to be freed from their importu-  ^ ;  1 uivh  into s())iie  posed the oui-bfion was add resse  it-u 10 illiil-  ----•■ —s iie'li hf> fU^v;.;! i!" iif. i/.-.:  tin, noticing With surprise the singular hear me eipjain. xjom't  s he'li  intothe iaws of sorpeats. Everv tca-lband to Elloa, was accepted, and ■ ^ a.,-5.3. ¡, w:« the effect ¡¡¡g questjoti  ^ . ' i ' I ruu; .i-:: tr:.-t:,i:t : a ¡1, ;. u hi usiir nr. r.a.iiw •  luro was nicc;y caisselled—and hand-j weddiug ^vas settled to 1« oa the coming 1 „. j ; ,p ve Mv^. r- led upon her, and si  somely turned; and combine thoso with Fourth of July. v -; v. uiv-.iityour a-i- -. . r. O:! et.-i .u.th-^t" July, contempt, and wishoi  somely turned; nnd combine thoso with sparkling blue eyes, auburn tresses, a sylph-liko form, and you havo a model  Fourth of July.  'About this period the viiiagoofX-  vv oi uivuityour r.  ii O'.tU;::;; uisf'rt ii tn t>->::;fj ihr \ lÛaCïî o:'  was thrown into a state of e.^cite.nent, before you that would not fail' to arrest ¡by tho appearance of two individuals, the allention.and even the adrairatioa ofjwho made a purchase ofa spot of ground !  a connoisseur. ¡in the heart of the place, at what tho my^^it,  "The other, as 1 have said, was of n villagers considered an enormous price,  had on Mary, "I cab she treated mo with O:! i;t.' i u.th -^t" July, contempt, and wished to be released from irrvHii, I sbaii 1 1« j Jjgj. engagement--giving, as a reason,  . J i that I was a poor, unknown mechanic, hoi! 'n .! n'ali your tc-nipany. j and that she looked for something high-  . „A.bs.urd. as tins may appear, it  T:í'í¡!«v. Tnfie, ic. ' -  PA.Y ■TKg-'By^TGHill. , ..  -, aiiu < ip>.vt to gire rj: »-ntt r Uiicou'tst hi the cvtroiiii;. at t:iy rvsi-imcc, H'here i j »¡nil he 5,i!i V' -.i ij bi'  ditTerent style of beauty. She might be likened more to the rose—for there was a gentle sweetness in her every look, that unseen and unknown, stole into the depths of the heart,giving it, as it were, a freshness and new life, oven as the night falling do«» resuscitates the day drooping flower. Her features were even and handsome—but they boro not the slightest look of arrogance and pride —on the contrary, all the divinsr attri-.  few minutes for a change of mail, the straager suddeoiy roused himselt* from ,butes wero shadowed forth—and benev  the apathy thu« far maintained on ilie Jottrney, tad with cnnsiderable earnest-Bess, directed my aueotioo toaa elegant  olence» forgirencss, patience and meek* oeas,could be traced in every varying lineament. Ber eyes wet« » mild hazel.  for the purpose, as they stated, of erecting a mansion, to be the summer residence of a young millionaire from Boston—one Ernest Sunderland Alvord. That a miilionaira 'Should select the town  of --for Kis summer quarters, was  an honor the good inhabitants had never, even in their palmiest days, dreamed of being conferred upon them; and of course there was no end to the talk, wonderment and speculation to which such an important event gave rise. Some few sceptics were found, who asserted the story waa a fabolons one, and got up for a bumbugi--bat even they were soon  >-i:RNr.ST srM)ERI..\XD ALVORD. " -To Miss EJ.IXN B<jKtK.i.N."  "As Ellen ran hor eyes o»er these few lines, she could scarcely believe her senses—nor was sho fully assured it was not a joyous dream, from which sho too soon would awi^e, until she had read and re-read tbem again and again. And then it 'Was the artist should bave seen ber, who would have had a living model of a proud—^beautiful woman. Her cheeks flushed ; ber eyes flashed; her form expanded, and she strode to and fro through the room, with all the proud majesty of an empress of kUtlf the *orld. All the drep longings of her heart were on the  er  "Is it possible 1" cried Mary, in surprise.  "It is true ! And now, to be brief; 1 will tell you my errand hither. 1 have loved you bolh--~now 1 love but you— and am come to off'er yon my hand ; will you accept it, knowing me to be what I am!"  **So sudden and unexpected was this, that Mary burst into tears, and for some timej was unable to reply. At length she succeeded in articulating,  "Charles Martin, I have loved you long in secret," end she leaned her head upon bis breast and wept.  «HZlbarles Martin went away that night a happy man.  rents,nurtured in all the luxury money could procure, I soon become cloyd with what I considered the tinsel of life; and after pa«-eiDg through collegc, which I did at an early age, I obtained the consent of my father to learn tho trade of a ehoemaker, that I might mingle and know eomething of people in humble life. It has been to me a great Bchool I assure you—ft>r in that humble capacity, I have learnt the world, &nd that their name is legion who will scorn him that toils, and yet play the cringing Bjcophant to the millionaire. This double dealing of man'kind, taught me to euapect thM« who professed to be my most constant friends; and I formed a resolve that in aelectinf a wife, I would find one who loved me, &r myself alone. Such was my object in coming to this place; and with a grateful heart, I can say, my object is ac-eompliehed—although the one on whom my affections were first centered, afler pledging me her hand, cast roe off, when she thought ibère was an '^portunity d* bettering tor fortones. I wiH not upbraid ber,** and as be «pake, he toivsd his eyes  A Fres Gospel.—The Louisville Examiner tells a story of a church member who had always been more remarkable fur opening his mouth to say amen than opening his purse. He had, on one occasion, taken his usual place near the preacher'&iistand, and was making his response with great animation. After a burst of burning eloquence from the preacher, ttii o^i^ped hia hands nud cried out in "a ki^Tof eestacy t "Y^es, thank God ! I have beieii ai|iethodist for twenty-five years, andit toisn't coat me twenty-five cents!" jrour stin  gy soul !" was tiie preacber's emphatic, reply.  It is better to be aequi^M^Vith tho history your own coB|iitry; than with that of Athens or Spart». The time is coming when ft man ni«y hold his head  bigh among the learned,although he has not received a classical educatiah, ■   

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