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Bloomington Post: Friday, February 16, 1838 - Page 1

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   Bloomington Post (Newspaper) - February 16, 1838, Bloomington, Indiana                                 ^tf isniíiJiiiiilii^itiaii ^mM  VOL. S.  FRIDAY FEBRUARY 16, 1SS8.  NO. 1©.  Ì  EÜHEU AMI rL'/!r.!S/IED VATAIV KUID.VV  BY M. L. DEAL.  OFFICE ON MAIN- CliOPs stí;í:¡;t, i ¡':-;r noor. \vkst of il a j. luiiirr's.  TIÍÍBJS.  Two (loü'ir.s i!i a'lv;u¡rp, two fiùv i:i fix mouili aii'l tlirec at tlie cnij ot'tlir \ ciiv.  A'o [>,i¡ior will Ijo (Jiscontii'.ui'il unti! all arrcarngfs arc I aid up.  (j;:^AvEUTisnMF.xTs o( ton linos or Ir^s, v. iil bo piin-lisljcil ilireo wpcks lor 0:10 dolKir, and -j cuntw lb'' eacli add it ion a! innen ion.  All ;idveitisfüif^/its /jûi.-I lir« tjiarki^d wi'h ihn nu:n t'cr of inpprtions,or they will be inyin'tcd til! iorbid and cliarçod accoi'dmp;!;,'.  The CASH must 11) vari i'!y arroinpany ndri'f.ii-''^-mpnis fi'ohi a disiance oy ili: y \vi:l not fcccive attention.  All lotti' and conniiuninaiioris aildrr'-^-J tn th editor inu. t i>i! fVi'c Ol']iosia ;f. No VM: ia-.i'i;i \v!:,>;. er nccij li;> c Vfu-c;,".! Ihmi tlu r.' t.\ ;:iH.  1  / 1  H  Ll.ST Oi' The fjilou-itio; gíMitlcim-a aicii' i' thorizcd ti) act as agents: to rccriv ; Job VVork, \ dvorii^in'.];; iV'c. and i crrÍ!) TiloiA*? Jo;i.\-< S¡iciiccr, la. II. H. TiiRoor, :\[ill Crov.^, la. ^ SAML'F.t. If. S;.iv r:{, j^owliii.^Lrr O'T) G-IMAMF.i. .Mii.i.-^.M'-, Fairl'a.\ , I 1. ^V'M. llF.rtMD, <, l.i.  G. Wav.man, .\I ii\Mi-!iur::, la. D. A. KAU-li \ X- w Allativ, I.i .1. S. luwiN, Lou¡«vu!", ivy. <îr)i;;E M.'.v, ¡'.u'kcrriljurir, Ài.i'it': Wm. y. J: iD.-.:rs, !<■',  Dr. I. P. .MAKw:;i.r., FraiiM'., î, l,i. Joti\ 1ÎAT r;:':Ti>N', < i rci'iic.isi . 1 i. (;i-ut:;r, (i. ilrdiord, indiana  .'il and aU' - cripiion -iiic same.  -.liii^ry t'c la.  la.  Tin: IJIiAZiLLl \N W iv'l'RADi;.  KUOM ::or;u: 'J.'.-; v..v;, .:;s. ^ Puy/s/i • / /r,  I have rtlrcaly iniornicfl lii-^ riM («T.^diíit wiien I cdtercd tlit; I5ay o!" I_l.'iiL;iii'la tlvic were nu loss lliiui lour sl'ivc doalors fr.iui üi a.'ii. w illing td complote their carm«'-. <J:k- dl' oí ii'uiian niisi.'ry lay at am liu- w mIi/i jit'iyj I'atlioins ol'tho Antarctic ; ami I was ti-.-.-^in^ly anno}-fîii by the sliriclv i ;i:id . w;'¡h li iidcss^iDiMate-, tlio wrcfclu'.l vicliois oMiiili.'cliü v,'av arii'i'. liiat 1 rus-olvel 10 visit t'lc vo^-.i I, ,'v ni;u>c' tin (jit'er o\' sucli mcdica! aid as iun ;,'a icndcncy lo ¡illuvialc the ot'ilic sullljcrs. ('¡Wnli this deícr-mÍDatioK I orJ'MoJ a boat to be in uuicd, and boarded the brig without ceri'innny.  I was rcct.;iv( d by tlu uí:í".'. s na deck with a r;r!iuii dc'i^rcc ol"courtesv, ):■'tii:iii)ln;4!cd with sur-jtrisc; whicii. wlicii 1 mado Liiown tiic ol.,cct (.if niy ' vijir, assninc'd an c\¡irossio;i uf dci isii.M or co:;-tc.iiji'. Firmly a 111','/in;; to luv howeviM", 1 insist(~d ii¡H)n's('i inj.' iid niiiisUjrinu; to th miII^icis '  • plaints had s(i powcrt'ully evi Tnc c;i¡);aiii gave orders llu.i in; , ci>iiiplii;(l with ; ;ind, j^racioiis ! I rib'e was presented to iny vie« !  It'the ri'adcr lias ever Ivcn on board ol'a Hudson  nli^;!lial Ptir)!L'-C, iM 1, if n< ccssary, 'ho-i: a'idibic Cou.-  I ))i\ s_\nni;«thy. demand should be I wn 1 h it a hor-  Krid.'d wi'h calv-  :r-iioil-cs, be II. I  ;r.;ili:i!i lave I ai'h side (m' 1 li'' lie • inaiieeba,..in /.-•rof llie d i I d.'ck at le e liei  s aiul slicep ; form .■-oinc A rtin^o of  ill-deek, from M il.ell W.'ic  '■•l.v  sim.ii  ad til  lb  dim  111 a line  crcctcd i.iea from ue.i d o: I a  stourd 1  poslnri <cn the  i'hi  (da;  fcclih; lollslv  v' own le 1 . I on li  \ iii|"ir.i  ', . ■. II till.' Ie:;i  ^ ilj. ir n.al; ' 1 .,1 y V lev. c aMeiilh'ii a ri lue starb' a : > ;ií - leiiei'.ei ti ■,ide of lb- dl  w lib ;.:ile.  l.imtivc of tin;  to kl  bet \\ CI  .phcatrnj; ul tears, elcly atul dii; lam, I bc-\\ oiale r. . bad nul  ììiver intulic;-; lo ^ r.r tir' '-ily sia  ii)e.i cftliis  ^^^latdiead lo  k ~ lliittcil to cona- up.»;: d'ck W ss iih tbr iiiiim h iteliw ay. il r«tlklicU(l, or p i; litMji. ihe ssiiii;, ii ; s\ 111'.' .1 ntii I to the <r;in;j;svay, abal't tin thai and tlie qiiai  'I he slaves, rows, (ore and al i.nd must of tin.' n l.hec.s, cither Uue.i!.;;!.;,; rnoiirnodly ciiaii; ;; ' i .a » fOi;^ Ol' Iheir titi i'. ■■ \ .i.'a ) fenia.'i • wi. ic of c/i; ■ m i cd, in sj,Ite of all th, ,i t_\ Ihcni quii !. !ii pa- - ; ihc.sc U'.o laii;; ^ of,', pa  coiintcrcd hill li L ua' i.ii,  pealll- Ic. ksofn,;., , v. ■ exici sieiis oi ciitiii', e,;.;( i tliat loul.iat like I 1 I , on I t.Mally iinnmniicd me. § • and the p'lor i.i ,:.c ■ • i riojiicnoii o! a '.'. hite iean (l,.'.d>;, .an 1 a ¡miran .i. 1 bc( n allowed a ra;; t.> e e, f/ Afior lia\ ni'j!; laki ti a e  l,cai tsickcnin;; se( i.e, m\  theafcr lani'c "t" 1» ^^^ Con I.'lined ab'Id! one b.'i!: ^^^ lleie. te on tin: ^^ se.M's ucic Kcpaite.l by  ci^bt fee t in Ik i^b! ; ii' ti !.: v ovidcnlly wrilhiJj;:'m ;l-e a: . from the idlici rs,,uid pv. itl;» t. i fercrs, I pathcrcd the .'ditiu.« li.l <lyin}; wictcbc:, iiad been knìo. ' ^itLi,Ilion liy ¡«"pcated appi.eat.. jaini.shir.i'iU fur liicir piteou-, . ■ inj; Wallings. 'I'liis wore i!., liai! ( lu'itcd tho-'C' shi ii k-; ami '' ics!( d my altcntioii <'ii ('(,a;d ib s.'ci i' w i V c> ami lllntbci , t bl I lorn lioiii their Ine a^' .i and tin o either to 1 crisii with hiii't;<'r aii.uin' the t'lass, or to  I ^ n t ' ^ '  liccoii c ihepicy (d beasts, or the sictim.i of seno 11,tus icptilcs Ol', p(l.s^ibiy, lo bl! preserxed ¡uid iioiiii'bcd l'V siiaie;eri. In the phI(.'ii'ii.'d parow-Miis of II.titei Hill .ninnisi), ibcy bad ctilied l'or ihi'ir ^iiiftrnt-- l'or then hiisli.ind ; - f,a tlii'ir pa ; eat ^ - - l'nr ^ ' ihe'ir II. il.t I -, ■ I tei s, and fi lends; ami l'or this nat-^ft Dilli mweiiiiiaiy < bulloK.n of fidu!.', ihcir h> dii'.^ liad b» ■ n e, m ||y biicia'cd \\ itli sti ipes, nnlil liatnrc ^H Kiink c\bae>ltd, no nane lo ie\ iso 'i'biir iin'a- i  *veic dis'ended ss uh the iindia\'. n nuli iiucnt fur ihc ^^ lack ol inch iheir helpless babes peibips vsiic ^ . jiei ishi-.g- --It w ils cpoziiig in si 11 ains l'i'oin ihcir nip-  iiifs. n.in;:lt d vsiili tlii'ir own !i!ooi|, W ^ On harning iUì'ìo fuels, indienafiua nuibled me  to suppress tho.sc soficr feelings wliich were before nearly choking ine; wliiif the hardened barbarians 'arotnid me wor(; stu'donic smiles upon their ftjco ■ The captains of two vessels were present, and se' crai oliieers. For the motncnf, 1 impiously wished to be armeil with 'he lightnings of heaven, to pun isii the guilty, ami tcininatc the sufforiiigs of their victims on the spot. Astius was not |-,racticiil>io, however, I gtivc vitnt to niy feidings in a torrent ol inveciive, pun ring upon them volleys of vituperation, I caniint recoiled wjiat I said; hnl for some tiirie I gave llirni broadside after broadside, without receiving a single siiot in return. They received my lire in silent astoniihnicnt, suiTering me (o nike thcni fore and aft, uriiil my intigazinc became exhausted, and I p.aused for lack of ammunition.  In the mean time, the two especial objcets of my compasbion were relea.'icd from their suirerings by .icath; and jiist as the visiting captain liad conin»>n-eed some observation in c.\cuse or palhuion of their conduct, our iitfcntion was itrrcs-fcJ by another object. Une of the male captives, a weil-madc, good-looking man,of about twenty-five years of age had contrived, all manaci; d as he was, to .scale ihc bulkhead, from the top of which, being unable to use his arm--, lie fell into tlie females'aiiartmcnt, where his head struck a ring-bolt with such Rirce as to ii'itcluru ))is scull. It was tho husbttnd of the youngest of the two women who had just bre ithed h'jr last. For a few moments lie lay senseless fivtu the elK>ctiofihcblow; but sooncaiiie to himselfsuHi--.,ully t;) understand what was said to him. In the ne\t mcrn JiU lie recognised tho dead body of his wile, which he franticly strove to claSi^ in his m .na-cled ;u'ni-s; and, with a yell of dcsjiair, endeavored to awaken lier with his caresses from the sleep of Icatii, while (he wound in ¡¡is head »a.s pourijjg forth a torrent of blood on the inaniiiiate object of his piteous lamentations.  The caj)taia ofthc brig now spoke, and ordered one of the oliieers to tear the poor fellow I'rom ihe corpse of his wife, and to stow him on the other side ofthc deck. He raised his mute-imploring eye to inc, ill which I read a .speedy lermination of hi.s miseries, and an ardent desire to expire on the bosom of his wife. The oliicer advanced to seize him; but this svas too much for mo to witnes.«. 1 sprang belbro the dying man, drew my dirk, and ordered the oliicer to desist on the peril of instant death.  '•Hold!" 1 e.\claimed,'*vou shall not molest him. J5<ick! i)ack! oii your life! No'man shall touch him, unless he I'ut his way through my body. You have butchcrcd the wife of his bosom; he is now (lying iVom the jlVccts of your savage barbarity; aiul they shtdl not be se[)arated, until his spirit is reniiilcd to hers, in that blessed world where liends (d" bell lik'i you can never come. Hack! or your bl'j'id shall mingle with the negroe'sl"  'i'lie ot'i'j'jr recoiled a few p'.iccs, whi!'-' tho others stoo.i ga/idga! iti(-', a:ul ciidi oilier in unite ajuaze-iiient. 1 stood fi.\ed in my purpose, however; and not one of the ciniscience-struck, guilt-appalled, cowaniiy u rctches, nor the whole combined, could muster up siiilieient courage to ojipose my .single arm. 'J'lie dying ctiptive's struggle was short. In a few minutes nion; he breathed his last, on the cold iiiaiiiujate lips oi'hej- he loved more than he feared death. I then returned iny dirk in its shcuth, and again addressed the embarrassed oiiicers:  -.Step forward, mhumtin monsters! and comtem-thc eiret'ls of your savage barbarity—your ,' 1,under. Look thereion the le^nains^d those [i(/(U' sii'lims (d,' \our iivarice and crtieliv! k too of their haples infants; which, if not IkiV-ilready gone to meet their parents in ti luttter world, tue fatdl never !<> ciijoy a ¡>aiviil\i Icuder-111' sill Ibis. Iliiw will you answer for Climes like ib" .e Ih !'oie the Cud of 'jM-tice? I donot marvel at your cow aodiee, I'or it is the iiisc(Kitable concouii-, tan! oi'guilt like yours. I do not wonder that you I turn ptilc at mv |ust rebuke, and tremble there like .'.ilprils at the uaii^way. Hut how much more will Uu.i I,e/id)!c wiieii'vouate arraigiiial bcfoic the bar uf Din me JiiMiee.at'id b.'tir that voie:j w hicli brought the univer.se into cMstcnce, proiiuunce the .awful sentencc--'ln asmuch as ye htnenot .shosvn mercy to one uf the least ofthe.-e, }e have not dime it unto  I"-" tjipl  'I'lii; filv  Mr. Prentiss' speech. The following i.s a brief and imperfect sketch of his peroration. His utterance is uncommonly rapid; his voice good; his entincia tion distinct; his manner, when e.vcitod, imprcssi*e, forcible, commanding. When about to close, he said—  '•Sir, is there a stato in the iJnion, that would submit to have her right of choosing her own rep rescMtativcs torn from her, nrnj n representative not her choice, palmed upon her, by a decision <•! this house? What .says Alassichiiscllsi From the cradle in wiiich young Liberty was first rocked; even from old Faneuil Hall comes forth i<or ready answer,—"It was for this very right of representation our fathers fought the battles of the revolution, and, ere we will surrendi;r this dear bought right, those battles shall again "become stern realities."'  '•Nv'ould Kcnludnj submit? .'V.sk her, Mr. i'peak-er ,aiid her very in;im;noth cannon will fiml .a \ o\cx to thunder in yo'ir ear her stern resj)onse. *.Vo. sooner than submit to such an outrage, our soi shall 1)3 re-baptiscil with a new claim to th< proud but nielancholy title of—the dark and b'judi groxi ml.  '•^Vhat says old 'Virginia, with iier high, stern device, her.y/t- scmprr Irjrannix, tht' proudest motto that ever blazed upon a warrior'.s shield, or ana tions arms? How would she brook such usurpti tion ? What say s the mother of States, and of S;ali right doctrines;,she who placed iiislnidion, as n guardian over rqircsciitatioii, to the proj)o-ition, lliat this hou.^e can make a ropreseatativo foe;. State, and force it upon her, against h-cr cl.oice and will?  ".■\nd where is Sou/A Carolina-, (he Harri/ Fcrcy of the Union; though there lives not the Harry <<{ -Monmouth, who can pluck from her brow the huirel. which she has so nobly won in many a well-fought iield? On which side, in this gieat controversy, docs she couch her lance and drasv her good blade I I trust upon the side of her sister Stale; upon the side, too, of the constitutional rights of tho States. And let her lend all the strength rd" her good right arm to the blow, when &ho strikes in so just and righteous a qt a rel.  •Sir, twenty-five State.s sit here in judgment upon the most sacrcd right of a sister State. Should yoin decision be against her. you tear her bi ightesi ¡ew-elfroin her brow, and forever bow her head in shame aiid dishonor.  '■Hut if this be your dclcrmiuation, I have but om-rciiuest, on her behalf, to make. When you deciue that she cannot choose her representation on this floor at the same moment blot from the spangled banner of ilie Ujtion the bright s!ar that glitters to the name of but leave thoi'.'r'y;:' behind  —a fit emblem of her degradation."  Tlie  TEXAS IN ARMS.  fuilowinti is copied from an odi,  extra Te.\t 20.  ("apt. ítalo- ill  K  pitbli-hed ;it Houston, Doc ■iu ARMS! TI) ARMS!! liiu'ie/ bu- jii-t arrived in this city, ii'j >11 tlic iiioi lung of the 20lh, abcu! nine oi'loi'n, II be.a\y 1; nog (d'niuske'ii'V w licaidui ihe diioction of Conception, and insiaaily afterwards a large body o( Aie.xican cavalry eliaige(i upon the port of He.xar, near tlie public s:i|uare. <' -lonels Karites and Wells immediately colic (;'cd tlu ii sol'.liers into a body, amounting to ab.Mit a bniidieo  .\ca¡)i)!o and those at .Me.xico. 'J lie shock,> at tho latter city ur ; invariably felt within a day or two after the ¡irst has sutrerej, all hough usually with !os.s violmee. Tho volcttnic chain appears lo e.K-K'tid froiii one city to iho other in netirly a direct line, and th:; ellect is thus gradually but certainly propa'C iK I. 'i'lie .s[)ot where Afe.xico now stands w;is f u'ir.erly great volcanic centre, and in tho imniciiiate neighL-i rhood isa large number ofextin-'.^ui.slied craters, 'i'he iamous I'apocapeti is never-tiu'less open, and smoking, and there i..' bfle doubt that this mountain is the enibouchie of tho products of those subte rraiicati comtnotioiis, which may ona day or anotlu.-r utterly prostrate the mngnificent capital of ihc Me.vican Republic."  Fro.'?! the Pcjinsi/lvania Keystone. Imporlanl decision vpm Nr^ru Suffrage.—We co-.ay the following from thc^Hoyllstovvn paper,and ire glad that (ho question of negro suíIVage ¡3 likely to be settled by ihe only tribunal that can put tho subje -t in rest. We uuders'and the question was irgucd at the supreme court at S'.inbury, and will jirobably be decided at the' next term. We havo very little doubt but that this decision of .ludge Fox will be sustained, and the principle settled that so far as government is concerned, this is a nation of '.vhite niijnt  ']'lieca-e~ of the contested election of Abraham c ret/, Coinmissionor and Richard .Moore, Auditor, >A'as argued on 'i'bursday last, in the court of Quarter Sessions, on the part of the complainants only, by 11. Cliapin.'ti, Fscp, neither Fritz nor Afoore ap-p Kired, either by themselves or counsel. Judgo Fo.x delived the opinion of tho court, at considerable leiigih, upon the ipiestion urged, whicli was, whether a negro in Pennsylvania has the right to vote.—The court decided that a negro had no right to vote—that he was not a ciiizen within the meaning ofthe constitution—and that the right ofsuf-frtigo is restricted by th;it instrument to citizens.  \\'e hope to be able in our ne.vt paper, to give the opinion of tho court at huge upon this important ubieet,as .ludge Fo.\ stated it to be his intention to educe it to writting, and file it on record in tho court. We will only say at present, that so far as sve could perceive, the reasons for excluding tho negro tVom sull'rage, appeared to be conclusive, c. ento many whoso impressions had previously Ik'CU diiferent.  THL-: i\RW SL'H-TRFASURY BILL. The ,Mtidisonian,2in speaking of the new Sub-'i'reasiiry P.ill, reported to the Senate by Mr. light of New York, nnkes the following remaks: "So far from having mitigated objectionable features ofthe former bill, the report of the Financo Com.oittee rc-asscrts the main proposition, and adds provisions i.till more objectimiable. It i» a bill, in iciiliiv, to charier a Tri'abury Hank with a ca])ila\ cpial to ll.e public levcnue, and power to invest surpluses in. stock.s, and to meet deficiencies by sale.s of stocks and issues ul notes. It contemplates a discrediting cd'all loctil curreticy. by rrjectingit after an interval from all receipts uf leu'eial revenur. 'I'lic eilec! of which, united with tho avowed policy of "grti'lually .diminishing the number ofStato Hanks,'' s\ ill be tiie ultimate destruction of all banks, 1 xcept a Trt ai tiry Jiank, which, some presume, it is i nteiidcd shall sup¡dy the only ^currency of the ( iveaitry. The idea of seiKting the Treasury into and tv.cnty men, and received them with tli ' luu.-'■ i,i .stocks, settms like a ludicrous^  detenuined courage. Just as the combat cuu tuiaic-^ „j-c^,,.tion wiih the'*15ulls and Bears" ol  d, he was despatched by Kariu's to procuiea b"'^"-; Wall street. The eonlidence e.xtended to the Banks  I'-''  la'.'ted to ie, w liieb Oil deck, ibi.' tWu  biilkliead  'art.  t'  at tl,  pr.  sent  , ( i' tl,,' la>li. a'i a  ; (,'. I Ili ait n lid laweje biiilal.lN ;ui . w liM li lii-'t ai-  v\ii'.ii( Ii('. They  iiile.iit i btui 111 en 11 upon tbegrouiid.  With illese woid.s J advanced !o !)iu g'l'Jgway, wtis about toik'jiart, s',hen the ca|ilaii» id' the brig «'.'.ptosKl a hope that 1 svonldiiot lea\e them m an-gi'i , but that 1 would w.'ilk behjw, and |oin them in a f'da-sid vsnie. 1 pronijiily decliiicd the prolll'icd cull I le~y, assii, ing bim that it ga\ e me \ ei y uiiplctis-;mt ii'i lings to In eat lie tlie same :ii r ivitli meli eiiLtag-ed in tills aboMiiiiable tiallie; but Were I to drink with ibeoi, I slufiild fei'l gmliy ofaii act of ssaiitoii impiety lluit luid stained the uutariii-)lied lustre ul' the llag 1 sailed mider.  Tík'v 1 eti^rtcd, w itb a ii.o-.t piorukmg assurance, ihatgieat niimbeiS of Ana'.lean Ses-eb; were at ihat leumi'iit engaged ill tbe siiii.e IraUlc; se-sels \Uii('h they knew w eie ow ned bv citi/eiis of the I . ."States, coiiiiiuuided bv .^iia i icall captain. , tilld IIKIII-iied by .\n;ciicaii and,linglish seamen.  1 made no lepls , but -tui-ped into mv boat, and \sa . "-. .ai on buanl ibe Antare'ic, svilii I'ood l'or reine.mu Mitili lent to Iloe ('ill tilg the passage from Al I tea to Aii.ei lea. ,\oi w as this the only ri'voltiiig eejii'l sMis ilooiiK'd to w it iiess, coiiiu'cted with this inlamoiis sy^.tein (d pi i ;u , \s bile I was tletained at Heiigiiela. Hi'ing on shore on i'"riday, the öth, of June, I satv alioui fifty ol" liiese unhappy beings handeuiled in pairs, nnd drove into tow n like so many y oko ofciittle, by .sfddiers on hm'-se back. .'\s the poor wretchcs ptisseil me, 1 could sec tho traces id'tetii i on tilniust every cheek, ami frum souk; eyes ilii y were streaming in toronts. 'i hey /lail Ix iui diiMtn Ì-0 (ill, and with so little meicy, lluit many (d'tbemwLie quiti' l.ime, thfir foot-prints being mai ki'd w iih bluod! Hut still, if any of them ful-teied or lugged u little behind tho rest, their inhu man ihiNcis would start tliom up ogflin by several -eseie cuts ol the lush on their naked bodies, with as imi( h uiu'iJiu'orn ii'^ ifihoy were driving so ina II) bullocks to maiki't.  MU. PRl.N'nsS'SPKim ~ From tho Corre.-.j nodonce ül'lhe N. Y. Cour. toEnqu. Il is imposbiblu for nie to givo you an kkw «íl  in order to convey despatches to Houst) i. W he was thus engaged, tiie eiieiny entirely sorruund-ed the city, and a heavy firing tippcared to be ke[i: up in all parts of tho (ilaccthe cotilddisiinct ly h'.'tir the two held pieces ofthe Me.xicans iiet'.r il;e public stpiare; he attempted to get iu to ic'. i uc ilu despatches fiom Karnes, but being untible to do this, h(t waited until 3 o'clock in the afternoon, to learn tl.e eviuit (d the contest, but iliing still cuiiliau al even at tb.it timet he coneludi'd to :,( t out and eun-\i'y the intelligence to this place. Hefne be loft the city il;c en^iny had brought up their t wo (.aiiuoii and (.'oimiii need di.sclitirg;ug them u|ioii the (¡uai ter occupied by our tru()¡>.-^; ¡m could distinetly hear our soldiers bii/.za at each discb.i i ge, ;is if in di li.ince and I'Miltatioii. Ho ■•itates that long alti-i' he lel'i. e\eii until night, he could hear the distant rotir uf tl'.e canno:i. The firing near l.'onception bad e« .i^-ed bcioie he leil: there were only forty of our sul-ibeii eiigag<.'d in ihiit quarter. He tbmk. thev weie I'lther cai)iurcd or reti i cd dow ii the ii\er. 'i'hc citizens (d' De.xar had previously leceued m> notice of t*- is tittaek, as all o( their spies, f.\o'pt one or two, who reached the city only a few muna nts before the .Me.xicans, were captured by the eiie.oy. 'I'his intelligence may be ri'lied on. WC I'oi! 'ar coiiintent until fi.ther iiitelligcnee shall base been iecel\ed. We will only say, t'ellow-(.iti/eiis, p:..-pare your rilles, for possibly this i'ligagen,cut Ikij maiked '-Tckfi on thu walls of Me.xico."'  Earthtiuakc in Maico.—.Me.xicaii i .npers to t ¿2(1 J/ecember, rccei\ed by the .Ncm t »liean^ lu-i', contain partieulurs uf the hlto servere e.u ibeiiakcs with which that country has been visited. The Hec sayst  'Successive shocks of an earthiiuake ha\e almost totally destroyed the town of .\capulc.i, while the gorgeous city of .Me.xico ith(.ll'wa. suiijer: to a violent and prolonged shock; hap|iily, howe\ei, m the latter instance no injury lesulted. The de tails of tho eurilKjuake at .'\capult:o am Ing'itfi.l. Repeated .shocks of e.xtremo violence and desasta-tioii havo nearly reduced the city loan.as- ul nuns. I'he houses wore overturned, and da du d to fia :-meiit.s, tho churches irrojiarably injuu il, tbe walls ut the Ctim/w Santo de.slroyed, iho whole eiiy ibrow n into a stuto ofdoploiublu consternation, arid ilie in-hubitants coni|)eiled to pass ihu niglit in the I'u lds and roads udjuuent to ihu town. W ben the iiioru-ingdawned, iiundrcda beheld them elses houseless and reduced to utter indigence. I'ortmuitely for ihe »afety ofthe cilizeus, tho dotrueiin la loind by tho shock was su gradual as to ii.l'urd ibem iuik) U> wvothomM)lvet( honcu tho loa:>o: 1 le v. l iincuii wderuble. Th«ro U (continues the Hei ) .»em itim ooiociikooe to be obaervod boiwcuu eaiUupiakca at  ol" n:akiiig them special depositories ofthe public money to he kejit by them under the lock and keyoí the tillicer depositing the same, is a stretch of liberality by which tlie.se institutioiu will feel, nodoubt,  highly cumpliuieuted.''  The Ibnttnmlrss ¡lit in the Mammoth Caveof Kea-ti.cky, issusjK'clcd by ii,nny to run nearly through the whole eaiih. Tne branch terminates in it, and ihe exploicr suddenly finds himself brought up on a ju'ojectiiig platforii), surrounded on three sidos by darkness and terror,a gulf on tho right hand, a gulf on the left, and lioforo him what .seems an in-termiii;ibl<; wid. He looks alolt, but no eye has yet rcticlied the top of the gretit ovcrreachiiig dome; nothing is there seen hut the Hashing ofthc water diuppiiig ("io.ii above, smiling as it .-hoots by in the uiiwonti (I gleam id" the lamps. He looks below, and iioihiiig there meets his glance, savedaikness as tiiick ;is lamp black, but he lietirs a wild, mournful na lody (d' w;i;eis, n wailing of tho brook for tho gK cii left in the upper world, never moro to bo le-si ili il. I'owii goes a roik tumbled overtlio cliff by the guide, ho IS of ojunioii the folks come hither to see and betir, not to mu'-c and be melancholy. I'beu' it gu s—L'lash — il has i eached the bottom. No —b.'iik, i: siiikcs iigaiii ; once i;io:e and again still laliiiig. Will It ne\c.'r stop? C'ne's hair begingt to biistli', as he hears the .sound re|»eated, growing li" s ami less, until tbe etir can follow it no longer. Ceitamly il ilie |dt of Fredeiic shall be eleven iboit -alld feet deeji, till' Hotlomless I'll uf the Mammoth ("ase iiui-t be itseip'.al; for two ininntc.* nt lea-.t, S'.e: tall bear the btolie dcsceudlllg. — MortU-  Sui'i \.'i.-Ill till! W I ' e -tiii.ated In llie (.1 ».(HU)  ■si  —'J'lie capital invested 1 ..m iiactiire in ilie I iiited Slates is P.o.wiio, ( iiiiiloyiiig ;iUU,000 hands. i..aiiiUactutc > ÖO,CUU capital and  able  tl.  tl;  woollen goods manufactured at .s.io 00J,000, and thu im-ii: J LVULWOO. 'Ihe sah'.eol'tbe c.ii'un i^.iuds e.ianutaclured last year, is L'>tiiiiti'ed ul -0,1 ¡00,000.  '1 lie value ol'ihe silk nutuufai'tuied in the Ignited Slates during the ptisl \ eai, is I'slima'e.d nt only ;y2;;0,000, while tbe impoits are sitiled at .siiC.OOO; and tlii 'i too when the home muiuifaciured article is dceidediy superior to the im|H)itw<l.  'l"be. U are tweiil V fl> e cil pi't t'lictories in the United St.iti's,e.>ii:,,inieg -£0 looms, which turned out ki>i year J.iJO.OOO yaidi of carpet, valued lit $1 pjryard. lie i.b's,'tb. i. \se.o impjrtud 530,000 y uid.', a', ubout ill'} aai..y cost per yard.   

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