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Anderson Herald Bulletin Newspaper Archive: August 5, 1870 - Page 1

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   Anderson Herald (Newspaper) - August 5, 1870, Anderson, Indiana                                 N.; <  Ttm.itmáfíSSwSSfíSS^. in^npRwmHu eiOTM  A BeUerl^iM^M  T&e Sentinel tliis w^ deTolet •ome ppaeeteeommei^ on tht refonl of Hr* Tyner to mempt . the inviU^ii of WiU C. Md^ms, ike Democratic eamlidate for CoBgreas, to make a jointoaBTMs ofthedi^ct. It does this in. a , manner intended to attract attention, vnder double head-4ine8 and with a profasion of italics and capitalf« Our neiglihor M dis-{lOBea to charge oar emidate with cowardice—a fear to defend the acts of ConCTcts.  We do not know all the no-tires tiiat may have indoccd Mr. Tyner to dootino the invitation. Certainly it was fOt bccanso he feared to discoas the issues divid ing the two parties, on qnestions of national and State policy, for ^ese he would not hesitate to discttss with any ffetUlcman, It is more probable that he knows, something of the past history of his competitor and **fcars" that creH the endorsement of a Demo cratic nomination will not be able to purge him from disgrace, or ^ranisc him into jrMpectability.  Most of our readers are not fa-toiliar with the history of the Democratic candidate^ who has been a j-esident of the district but li short time. For their ioforma-tion, therefore, we shall oroceed to call attention to a tew tacts of ^ttblic interest at this time, i>eing tareful to state nothing which can not be proven true by official documents.  Will C. Moreau twice enlisted in the military service during the late war of rebellion, as will be shown by the military records. We have reason to believe that  VOL 3.  fimw 'pò JMM J^tttm, Jmm J^taPt fAi.%  ANDEBSO.N, MADISON CO.. INDljyf|t; mDAT HOMSG; OTtJST 5, fôTÔ.  Official: E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant General.  A true copy of th e original order from the records of ti e 8d Indiana cavalry, ujion file in this office.  [Signed] J. G. GbeeWalt, Adjutant General Indisna.  Adjutant Gcnerars Office, Indianapolis, July 25,1870.  No comments ot ours could make the rccord more damaging. ^^  Nothing could make it or increase the detestation in which the Democratic candidate is held by all who are acquainted with his history for the last ten years. The history contained in the official documents we have quoted is sufficient to justify Mr. Tyner in declining a joiut canvass with Moreau, and probably it had some influence in determining his decision. If, however, they have not been brought before to his notice, their publication now will confirm the wisdom  fornatioA of •«»•«•  iX CKLCCKI IÌT&  How'  ftltililâia laíek  strong aerial currents, which,after becoming eomplicatcd, rioted « while in olose combat, and then separated, perhaps, bv deotrictl force, formed again in different quarters—two strong channels of mortng air emerging upon a common center. Approach each other, the space through which thei electricity inherent in the air was diffused became rapidly kss, »K^««»^»« manners, still less and would bo  the moving  clouds ally motio^  walls through which it could not break, and the friction caused by the mobility ot i|s own particles upon themselves, intensified the beat until it became first luminous, then lambent, then concentrated into tangible form, and  «ma tU M.  Yâi  fiNiír* «oearred wc^èi^ phon«BiMm iir ih« -liyt  night,*i%«rt)y after idne o*«lo«k.  Wf Jeay?» Arom ft  ttin the  ind resillad âit  tlM  tu iho jmntrr^ ' m^^^ tf H, irhen  ft wfts k««wfi (lNü4i mwê doftd Iho wholo voHd  parted tinllir, esreept' the leaders  In » eertahir neighborhooé iM, _ . oarparish thcr« residei ft f«ryi'whleh wm oi, inteiligènt yonng gentlemaa, ol,beauty, and #  appearance anèiand «dmiration-----— , ,, . ^ .  «"T «onths ^¡^oT^^i  caÌrioJ alonX ^^ chanis if a blooming frota « iMge locomStiVe reieetor, fw t»d wasbarn og no, K'LSìJ?*^^?^  » neiAbor,^'aM «mcs brightor Uai «^«f« ii.only one sìiaft in the  to themoving mass oti^if^^j^,______«^««-l* r.*__i^.i minA. «mi it neces^urr to  ' «om- » fldriotfi work was dono  from ^sy bf peaeefùl  goyjfrinùetttr, the offre« i^eeh« free sehools,'  ined ber Uushing tonsent to'ject fora distane e as far ar the ^c»"» no worlmew in Ih» mine »i «fre»<>08pel, theeorMiptwof J« - - - Ihathonr. The leene dtwribed P®W»omorals, wa®drifenth>mtho  damsel, and earth and every itirroanding oh- nirnac«. FortOBately  • ) !__A. JS. . _ .1* . A. m ^ ,m Ate M M A «M A A^a*.» !  orne his wife. So far, so good, and had it not been for an unfortunate incident that—  "Radelf fiiappM tb« dieri ia tWi^ Tfaat lM«ad thsir Wuis to^Émi  teroid, fading with a red horning the same might have been said of'J**^» "P J®, ^^S  eye eottld reach. The reflection, , ««  was red and glarish, and looking fSC^nd. The great Inmpi . insUntly onward, we had time to borning coal were thr^own high in see the outlines of a shooting as-  of  concentrated fire, which discolored and spent their fury on sur-  of his course. While we wouldi^, t^Ji^:^^ confidently trust the defense of^"' numerous balls  our party to the candidate of our  choice, we would not advise him rounding objects.  attended, however, by an serious  finally yielding-to the power' of its'them that has been said of thou-fTJ»«:« «!<>y<l» floating in  own explosive force, burst asund- «»nds of other foolish boys and,»'» Ticinity, and it left a track of  tha air, an^prcftenled the appear anee of a volcano in tntptton. The air waa fairly Hlominated by  the stream of nfe leaping from the vertex of the mine. Work-  of girls, namely, that thi^ s^^^^^^  of earth.  Tolk about yoor reform parties and reformers. Iler^ was a reformation wronghi ont by the Re-poblican porty tnat has nopttt^lel  Ow&tAnRft (Inly 90) Corrc8iiob(icnce ot the  "^TOÏKIÎDO AT OWATOiVyi.  two  by withdrawing from the juris-  , J , —— -----;------,diction of the tribunal author  he didn t get luto the service one'ijg^ to try him. other tinie, when he was paid for poing. He turned up, however, in 1862 as Major of the 9th Kentucky cavalry, which position he found it convenient to resign very soon, as will be seen by the following order:  IIEIDQ'U KK^TTCcar Vou,  Alkl'T OsiTBIAt.'« OrFICB, Fbavkfobt. Sept. t4, 1SS6. i  brtffoJUr Gttural W. R. U. TerrrU, Adju ^ latU Gatend of Indiam, IndiamjtoliM, imdiana-.  GE5BRAt—I have the honor to acknowled^ the receipt of youre dated the fOth instant, i From official records on file in Vnv office it appears that Mnjor W. C. Moreau, of the 9th Kentucky cavalry, resigned November 9, 1862. This is all the official information on file concerning him, but there is unofficial information based upon rumor to the effect that his conduct while connected with the army was not very creditable to him, and he wai^ fofce'i to resi;?n.  Verj respectfully,  D. W Lini.sy, Adjutant General of Kentucky.  damage.  Chlaa and the United SUtes.  American literature is growing „ , . ' ^ „-. ^ ^'»th such surprising rapiditj', it is  Fearful Storm of \\ ind with-impossible for any but a literary oat Eain or Hall — tnan to keep pace with its progress.  Trees and Fences Destroyed and it is only occasionally that we —A Brilliant Air Fiend and can give the current issues of the Its Explosion» press sufficient attention to war-  . ^ V L i . rant a review that will prove val-  Thisraornmff at about.half.pasti^^^j^,^ ^^ our readers; but we find  0 0 clock this c.ty was v.s.ted^i^ the "Oldest and the Newest  by the most tcrr.fic and dc8truc-|E 5rc, China and the United  t.ve torna.lo which it has i^tJ^s^hy m\\\am i^pcer.l). D..  known. J he round house ofi^^ gernmne to the  inona and ht. Tcter lUilroad questions of the hour, we  Company was unroofed and a large proportion of the walls dc-raoIisheJ. The en jine, Clermont was nearly buried in the debris* but sustained no serious damage The niiiht watchman was in the  courted .and were marri ed. an adverse fate had ordered erwise, and our hero was des tined only too Soon to have his cup of bliss changed into the bitterness of gall and wormwood.  As soon as their engagement had received the sanction of the eld folks, preparations were made on on extensive scale to have the nuptial ceremonies and the festivities attendant thereupon eon-ducted in a style in keeping with their elevated position ia society. Time passes on apace with the happy pair, and the eventful  Ij^J that prodaeedby the coruscationsthe «onflagration by throw-a large aized sky rocket. Its enrth and manure in the or-Jdirection was from east to west, »«ce leading to the pit. The 'and waa not heralded by the Ivast were sobdued on Sunday,  noise or report. It faded out ^^^ accounts the coat in  softly high up in the ethereal;*^« P»' ^iW bnrning, and li-vault of the heavens. It wast^»»« hrcak forth «gain in o not one of the common ''shooting C^JIJ^®' volome  tars" 10 often seen.  The Female Tea rirm.  A true copy of the original letter as on file in this office.  £>igncd] J. G. UllEh'NWALT, .  Ai^utant General oflndiana.  Adjutant General's Office, Indianapolis, July 20, 1870.  We arc siraply statin;» facts witliout comments. Hence we  arc constrained to present a brief resume of its merits to our readers. Dr. Spcer was a missionary to Canton from 1846 to 1852, and for the last eighteen years has  , , v.. r II 1 * f 1 r ¡been engaged m preaching the  houf^c when It fell, but found p^.pd ¡n their own language to refuge in the pit underneath thcl^j,^»^,,^^^^^^ ¡^ Cajifornra; he is,  treat hi3 tandingly R" exhaustively. The book is'^  refuge in the pit underneath the I ¡^  en-ine tender, fl^c >vhccl of the^^j^^^^,. prepared to w.nd-inill, on the cinincnce of thei  city was ccinpletcly d-stroycd. ¡^^^j' exhaustiVcly. Thi  Miss Susan A. King, a aingle lady, who has accumulated a large fortune in the real estate bnsi* x Ineas, carried on by her in New  morn that was to witness the hap- y^^ll city, is the pirtner of Mad-py consummation of their fondest! ^ Demorest, iVan enterprise hopes drew nigh, when, alas! the „ ^ j ^^^^ has ever  unfortunate incident occurred beeS attempted in this that put an end to their plcasantl ^hcy command a capi-  drcams and delighted anticipa-  tions. One afternoon, only ^ing ia now en route for  few ¿ays before the auspicious China (viiSan Francisco) there  hour our young friend concluded ^o begin her exploration of the that he would enjoy a refreshing purchaSe a plantation,  bath in a creek that ran within a ¿¡r^ct*-^ f^^ce ofa thonaanci short distance of his home. Act- • Celestials in their tea  mg upon the thought, he wended gatheing.  his way to where a large magnolia ® ®  This coal mine is said to be one  in the world'ft falatory^ and here waaableasing conferred on this nation that ia beyond the power of tongoe to tell.  A party that has courage enough to drive from the earth soeh a monster, a party that will take tho chains from the enslaved, and, then declare them to be citizens of ^his free government, and then to make that citizenship aeotire to them for all time, plaeo in their  This wheel was uc;u*ly three hun-  1 J r ^ • 1- A 1made up of materials  drcifcctm diameter. A ^^r^'^iatheíed by the writer iñ his in-  ico house was blown to atoms.  The checsc factory was so badly  ■/tercourse with the Chinese, under ioircumstanccs calculated tD ex-  stood near the bank of tho pal lucid stream, and divesting himself of his clothing was soon dis-orting in the limpid stream. Suddenly a sound broko upon his  ear.  Hark, 'twas tho ripple, not of the water, but of a silvery laugh,  A Singular Explosion.  The Providence Press says that on Tuesday the following singular accident took place > in the kitchen ofa gentleman'of that city : **While Uie ook was  dama;icd as to be unfit for further,,^^^^^ favoraOle points of wa  u^e without repairs, and I am^i^^j^ . ^^^^  to d that he summers accumu-i ¡^^j, ^he rehaionsi»»^ ^ female fn  and peering cautiously above the getting dinner she placed a can  lo.iiau. U.c i practically  lation ofchcc.se must be J^f «'(Jljina.  I do not know whether the disas-  andthe United States,"  .,, . the advantages ot increasing 1)0-  ter will occas^sion an interruption^,Commercial intimacy,  in t!ie inanufacture or not-  I the benefits to be derived from  Theupper i ortionoftheftonts ^,^^ introduction of the Chinese of several buildm-s were blown'-^j^ departments of  turn a-aiu to the "official in-ufl ; awnin;;s .ands.-n boards wcre^j^jj^j. ^^^^^^^^^^  ties incumbent on the citizens  was his horror to see inamorata, accompanied friend, not more than hundred yards distant, and  tilowly approaching the spot where he stood "in all his naked loveliness revealed." Here was a predicament indeed. If he remained where ho was the young ladies  .................awiiin;;s andsi  formation" of tho conduct of thejbadly dama;,'ed; trees and C^'ir-'iyes^in^umbent oirthe it ^as  gentleman (?; whose ability to "cn fences suffered severely, and^^^^ re<Tard "np<»8«ihle for him to es-  •'evi^c#rate rottenness" our chimneys and out buildings cape detection. V  Imire. We qu'to generally capized. ^omo .^ addition, there are......  Lrmy of the roofH were quite badly broken,! ^ summary account of  of tomato soup on the jrange to warm, as she had'been in the habit of doing, with live coals upon the little round cover in the top of the can for the purpose of melting tho solder. Instead of the solder metling as usual, however, the can in a few moments exploded with aloud le-  tion, and ita deatruction would fall heavily oo ita ownera, who are residenta of thia city. Had the fire occurred at a leaa on-seasoable hour a great losa of life would doubtlesa have resulted.  -ft iWf I '-  From th« Cinclnaatl UmmU«.  LVOiANA miTICS.  ot the moat extenaive in thia aoc-party tnnst ' bate in itaeir a high sense of jus  tice and moral honesty, and can not and will not pursue a policy not in accord witn the beat inter-: eata of the people.  At all events I am content with it a's a reformatory agency in politics. It is the beat we can have, and if wrongs creep into thé party let na caat them out, and ri^ht them inside of the organization. Vie can never right them by joining hands with the enemy of all reforms.  I have been faithful to the or^ ganization in times past, and I propose to continue ao in tho timo to come. I had the honor to east the first elcctorial vote that  SpcecH of Lieutenant GoTcmor jCnmliacii at Indianapolis, Wednesday Erealnff, July îltH.  The following is the speech delivered by Lieutenant Governor Cumback at the Republican Mass Meeting in Indianapolis, last Wednesday evening. Mr. Cum- Republican  back's spueeh was only preliminary to the speech of Scniitor Morton, but it contains such thorough vindication of the past policy of the Republican party and such an arraignment or the Democratic party, that we publish it in full:  to a«i the Armi  Qcighboc. seems  find him next in lue Anuy m «nc — t------------,v ' liiescntea a summary account ot  Cumberland as Captain of the 3d and others dama-ed but very lit- ¡j^^ Chinese at home, and a his-  Indiana cavalry, where "Pap .. Itory of their empire, their man-  Thomas" believed his conduct de- i^icre ""»'Ineis, arts and institutions, taken  «erved special mention, as will be bail, fhcre seemed to bo one ^^^^ authenticsiurr.es,  üeea by the following: current approaching the corrections of the mis-  from the south west and another' „„ ^ ____  H«*i»*'» D«r-Tor CiT»B«ai..Kt>, from the south cast and when I,t^'^es and misapprehensions into Chtóaooogm,Ten.. Aprilao.isw. L 7 V^ ^ compilers not we ac-' ' ' first noticed these currents thcyi , „-'.l nu*_____ i____  8tcoi»> Field Order No. 95: -re ,,ui.edi.,.nt f.o„> cach othí,?-  EXTRACT.  By virtue of the authority dele gated the M:yor General Com-jthey appeared midway manding, by the Secretary of^two currents, and at a low elcva-War, Captain Will C. Moreau, 3d I tion, a light, small at first but InditBA cavalry, having tcndcredj^adually increasing, until it his reaignation while under¡reachcd the size of a hogshead, charcea for obtaining money un*jlts base was parallel to the face <l«r ntlee pretenMs, and etherjof the earth. The sides seemed condliet onoecoming an officer to approach each o^ther at an in-and o feiktlemaa, aad having twice-dbaconded from this depart-snent to avoid a trial upon tiiesc  would be sure to see him," and ¡f port, blowing a part of it across  •room, scattering scalding soup in all directions and over everything —ceiling, walls, freshly ironed clothes, and hurling live coals about toe floor and even as far off as upon a table on the ojiposite side of the kitchen. The cook, who fortunately was not near the range, and who was tho only person in the room at the moment was severely scaldcd in the face and upon.tho neck and arms by the flying soup:''  What should he do? Ah, happy thought! there was a tree, and if he could only manage to climb that unobserved he might secrete himself among the branches where the thiek moss and leaves—  "--ii-ith (Hendlj giili»e  WvalJ bide his form from iirjingejen/'  No sooner said than done, and  mo.st accurate information on the snugly stowed away in the top of subjects treated ot in this volume, the tree, and waiting very im-whlch fihould be carefully read ¡patiently for the young ladies to  "If you do not close that window, waiter, I shall die from the draught." said a lady at dinner. "And if you close it, I shall die from the heat in this hot weather." exclaimed a stout fair  J \  by all who desire to understandlgo by. Unfortunately, howcver,ilady. Then there was a giggle thoroughly the capacities ot thcjin the hurry and excitement diners at th« dilemma  It is attractively illustrated by a large number of enp-avings, which add materially to its inter-  cluaivcly.  now Stnccrcl  clination of about 30 degrees. At the top of this cone, and appar---------- r ently just senerated from it, ap-  UuiM ^ to date from J.«- 1 jud^ frou. tea or fiftceu P-f ¡l^  lect in heiglit questionably be large. It is pub-  rhe cone beneath he blaze,,| , j the NatiLal Publish-scemod to revolve rapidly around. J Cincinnati, who sell  f,itthrouAcÎAvassin.a.ènts ex-  the air-fiend becamc constantly more intense as the currents approached each other, and its revolutions became proportionately more rapidly until tho shock caused by the colli.«ion, which occurred on cedar street, some fifty rods north of the public square—a terrific and deafening sound was heard, followed by a dispersion of some fifty fragments of electrical li;îht, in apparently solid form. They were seen ri-cochiiting in every direction, approaching the earth and withdraw ing from it in fantastic, though appalling, gyrations, Tho scene of this phenomenon was tho region of the greate»t disa.ster. The wind blew shariily but di<l not do the damage. There was a fierce and terrible force in the  Chinese and their probable influ- the moment he forgot his clothes, ence upon the future of the United which, lying on the bank, at-States.  of the waiter, when a literary gentleman said : "My dear fel  nai/1^861.  By command of  MAJ. Gcjf. Thoha£. SorrnAED HUPFJIA*,  Aaaistaot A(^atant General.  A troe copy of the original order from the records of the 3d In diana cavalry, opon file in this office.  £Si^ed] J. G. GftSBHWALT, Adjutant General Indiana.  Adjotant Generara Office, In-diaoapolia, Joly 25,1870.  The foreg^njr order was approved by the War Department, M follow«;  W-k* UnrkwtnnMt,  Atman OMSAi/t Orriea, WA9UiMvro9, Oct. 4, laa*.  BpecWarderNo. 827:  EXTBACr.  Boraoeb of Field Order No.  Apnl 4. 18G4,.from Ilead-quarterv 0<^rta«nt of tiie Onm-berU^d.^ aa dishonorably dia-miaaed Captain Will C. Moreau, 3d lodiaa* eavairy, for having i»od«r«4 kia reaicnation while oader «fc«mea Cmt okaininf non-ey ood«r ikla« oretenaea, and otker e>o4oet ooSoeoomg ao of-ieerftod »gentleman, and har-inf diNneonded tram hia dmrt-meot to avoid Ik trial oi these ehMM^ by direction of the Preside lihereby confirmed.  of tho  Wof.  To read Democratic ¿purnals one would think the one point about which they are especially anxious is to get honest men in Conjrress. This is all proper too  tracted tbe attention of the girls, low, your duty is clear; close the and with the proverbial curiosity window and kill one lady, and  of their sex, they must needs come I it again and kill the other  nearer to sec if they could not lady." unravel the seeming mystery.  Approaching the foot of the tree  An widower was recently re-  they soon discovered what the jectcd ^ a damsel who didn't mysterious bundle was, and bc-jwant affections that had been came lost in conjectures as to warmed over, how a man's clothin;; without the  man should happen to be in that sequestered spot. They gave Iree  Working woman are wanted in Colorado. Reliable reports say  play to their imaginations and.tbat a thousand could find imme-their tongues, and not a few were employment there, and at the jokes and laughs in which bigh wages. A competent girl  they indulged while submitting the garments to a critical examination.  Matters, however, did not look so funny to our "man up the — it is a correct idea. "But whatltreo," and, fearful of being dis-will be thought of such pr'^ten-'covered, he resolved to change tions when the party nominates'his base and secure a better po-notorious scalawags for such pos-jsition. In doing this ho inad-itions. And this is just whativcrtantly threw his whole weight they do. If the State were raked on a dead limb, and in the from one end to tho other a more twinkling of an eye down hel notorious vagabond than Bill came with a thundering crash, .Moreau could not be found ; yetjand lay sprawling on his back wo find him a prominent leader right between the startled girls, in. the Democratic party, and ajTliero were two piercing shrieks,! candidate for Congress. lie was'a smothered oath, and hastilyj dismissed from tho army on a ¡picking himself up, the p ' '  commands better wages than a male laborer.  there  Carriages, Bnggles Ac.  rhera are great ftdvantaffei In what i* termed horn« mana'aetaro. To this we call attentioa to the eottrie panned bj the Miller Bro'«. BiHetoataiiie, Ohio, •ad Mande, Ind., Caniaga Wurkt, who also hare a branch at Aa-lcnon, in tho hand« ofB. F-Alford. Thi« fina makM a ftriot rale to employ none bat Ant clasa mechaoict and «M nono hat ftrat clau mv terial, and therefore müke none bat first clasa work. Tho; work from thirty to mea. Work all their wood in their  fjAni* fof.'own ihops, anier their own laperTbion  tvur ici j •  the air Itself, which r othingcou^^^^ >rcten8es-as shown by a in one direction, while the young hence their roccc« In t«,«nc«. ThU  withstand, bmgle 8Uirn,i^es ,cd order of Gen. TuoMAsHadies wore equally as nimble in bnütui» an extensile andlMting  plucked from roois. un. seems to be regarded as a getting away from so dreadful a Wlin Ohio where thoy hare been in bat  was torn tüc itnce, wniic ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^ represent them in'sight in another. Returning af-;«»®»" fr^« r»"' They ate aUo  'Congress. What hi:;h hopes weUor the coast was clear, our hero,•^•'tf® t«»^®loiiana, Ilfi-  its fellows were unmoved.  e row of onions in a neigfi-from the to  bor s ffarden were torn from ground and the others left  might entertain of an honest'resumed his clothing, and straight-,"®'" •""i®**»®''Any pcwon buying  management of public affairs with a Congress 'of Moreaus ! If  way went to his home, where,¡from thi» esublUhmcnt know that they  «-----4 • ♦ K 1 a ui A.jwicaua ; xi thc shortly after, a noto wss handed «»bnjrSng a «r»t claw article, warraatod  grow and ripen unaisturoea. party wish tho people to havelto him from his fiance, decIaring>nddefenJeJ,ata«lowflsureiand at at The r"® jjany faith in their professions,'their engagement to be at an end. fair tetni» aa at any establiihment in Indl-I  tc upon which 1 oaso tiic :they ha I better select men furjlf any of our rea«lers arc spoiling »na or Ohio. Call ard see tor yourselves flo^ ingthcory: ine excessive neacr^j^^^^ jj. . that are not for a fight, tliey can easily be ac-^ ti«» »Vtory, at Bdlefontahio. Ohio  so notorious in the scalawag llne-lcommodated by asking that youn^ Mancic, Indiana or oa B. F. Alford, An  Ladies and Oentl^me*, Fellow Citizens ; I came hero tonight for the same purpose that has brought together this large and intelligent audicYice ; to hear the 8pi»eche3 of our eminent Senators and our able and distinguish- _ . cd Representative. Grovernment a littlo more than  Although invited and placed on th« bills as one of tho speakers ofi^""® ^^^^ conflict with " * ' the enemies of free government.  During all the first four years we  this, my native State, ever gave, and I regard it as the greatest honor that has ever been conferred on me. In 1860, being the first on the elcctorial ticket, my name was first called when the electorial college met, and I gave that vote for Abraham Lincoln, as the people of the State had in-structeil me to do by their vote It was be who led in this great reformation, and under bis administration this great work was brought out. We have had control of this  tho evening, I had no intention as there seemed to be no necessity of occupying that position tonight. I have no intention now of making any extended remarks.  I will take this occasion to say that 1 am a firm, earnest and sincere believer in the Bepublican party.  I found it true to the country in time of war and no less steadfast in the defence of right in time ot peacc. Every man, woman and child belonging to our party has ever been true to thecountrv. It has never furnished a single recruit to the rebel army in tne South,Tbr to the no less traitorous Sons of Liberty in the North.  It had the courage to attack and destroy the institution of slavery, an institution that had corranted and controlled every brancn of the Government under Democratic rule; and when it could rule no longer. it lifted its wicked hand to strike at the nation.  This glorious party that you and I claim as ours, when tho enemies of the country were in front and foes in the rear, and all was darkness and gloom on every hand, never despaired of the Republic, but prayed and fought and hoped on mid defeat and disaster until it had freed every slave and conquered, every rebel. I am. therefor 5, proud that I am here to-night to say to you that in my opinion no nation can furnish a political party which has so proud a history as ours, and in all coming time the organization of the Republican party will be hailed, not only by the people of tho nation, but all tho nations of the earth, as the brightest feature in the world's history.  The foul blot of slavery destroyed tho moral power of this nation among the nations of the earth.  Our claim that our countrv was the land of the free and tho homo for tno oppressed excited scorn and derision while wo upheld a despotism in our midst that for cruelty and oppression was without any parallel, except in tho daker ages of tho world and  had a most gi^^antic war with the rebels, and during the second four years we had a conflict with a corrupt and treacherous Kxccu-tive, who undertook to rule the country and assume prerogatives unknown to and unwarranted by the Constitution. lie tried to thwart the will of tho people by vetoing the laws passed by their representatives- He turned honest men out of office aad put thieves in their places, and would have carried tho country, to destruction had not a Republican Congress passed such laws as to hinoer and cripple his base ambition.  There was no peace under his administration. lie was endeavoring to fan tifa flams the dying embers of an unsuccessful rebellion. His treachery incited riots and bloodshed at the South, rendering person and property alike insecure, and tho financial policy of his administration was constantly changing, made a frequent and rapid fluctuation of values in the North, paralyzing trade and industry, and prostrating business of all kinds. Tho revenues were collected and were wnstol and stolen, and the public mind was filled with unrest and foreboding.  Under these circumstances the Republican party nominated General Grant for the Presidency, and the people indorsed tho nomination at the election.  Ue demanded peace and it came, llis very martial presence was enough to compol it. More than a million of brave men whom ho had commanded, and most of whom voted for him tor President, stood readv at a moment's warning to aid him to punish the peace breakers, and they aro ready today to do the same thing. Now we have peace, perfect peace, and what is the result?  In the South both person and  m^iirerf «wHgaanfi  . - _____tb« Tab^oa  ^WSWtei^iiNk J^ wi may thott «ea ttiif «ith tto poet—  A aalM of, apf «dM ef. Ms A mitflof 0lveiiMM«MI Mtntr;  Attsi^f hnrtsMé a ttàibn of baadi, Aia t{M Us of our Uaioa forever.  All tMf is the mult of the orgs niùfion and perpetohy of the Emttblieali Mrty.  Before 1860, (it yeartithe Dem-crats had control, yet under their dispensation of afikira scctioaal hate eonaUntiy tnereased, so that fo«tiMllî«Pf]lh£ BaUon wns tarned overtift' o» we had really bec^^mo two ^peoplet, «hating each other ^nd filed with bitterness. With "the o^wrlh^ow^o^J^emoevaey, Mid ph^ àe$trm^<m ot slavery,, iill the&e feeling of àcciional hi^o and j,c3lpnsy are rapidly passing away.- Uleiwlicy of the Democracy was to nationalize slavery or dSsmember the Union. As Tr.tU theae purposes were at war with the best intérêts of hnmanity, they were not permitted to do either, and the best judgment of the country is a^nst them, and they are and I ho|}0 ever will bo ia a Iiopeleis minority for th» great wrongs they have inflicte<l on the country. ' For their adherence to slavery tbey ought to kept out of power for naif Ik centor? at least»  I can see nothing in the part history or precont position ot tho Democracy to commend them to the favorable consideration of the cotintry. They find fault with our Cnanciiring, but si <11 I think we are doing very well. Wo are paying the national debt a& the average rate of one-quarter of a million per day, and constantly reducing the taxes.  The Bepoblican party intend to see that the I tst dollar is paid, and if they retain tho power it will bo paid at no distant day.  The Staite of Indiana, when wo took charge of it^ had, of course, under Democratic management, » debt of several millions. We have paid that debt. We" have a currency that is sound and satisfac«> tory—good alike all over tha country. You do not have to bo shaved by tho brokers as wo did in tho old Démocratie times. In fact, the whole raco of money shavers have all disappeared with the departure of the swindling Democratic banking systeu. Yoa do not fail to remember what splendid financiers ihes« Demo-" crats have been in our State. You remember/the free bank system, when they flooded the country with their bills gathering gold dollars for their dollar bills of tho people, and when the pcoplo called on them to redeem they paid them back from 25 cents to 60 cents for each in many of theso banks. Ruin and bankruptcy was the result.  You may go to any Democratic county in the State, where they have tho management of matter?, and you will find the expenses greater and the taxes higher than in tho Republican couutios. Yet in these Democratic counties I dt> not bear that they propose to dismember their par'v and organize a reform party. That policy is for Republican counties alone, that by that iort of hue and cry they may slip some hungry Dcm* ocratinto office.  If there was any sincerity in tho cry of reform they would begin it where it was most needed, anl where they had tho contrt»^ I would recommend to them thi.^ scripture: "And' why beholdci^t thou tho moto that is in thy brother's eye but considerest not tho beam that is in thine eye'f Or how wilt thou say to thy brother: "Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye; and behold a beam is ia thine own eye?"  "Thou hypocrite, first cast out tho beam out of thine own eyo, then shalt thou see clearly to cast the beam out of thy brother's eye."  All theso pretended refon» movements by the Democrats aro mere delusion end fraud. Stand by tho Republican party, and by so doing the best interests of tho country will be promoted. If wo make a mistake as a party, let us not shut our eyes to it and blindly swear that it is right, as the Democrats do, but let us acknowledge our error and go back to tho right.  We may have made mistakes, and who does not? But whether we have or not, we have saved the country from dismemberment; we have destroyed the only enemy to the nation's peace and perpetuity; and we have, as we ought to have, tho confidence of tho country. I feci very much liko  property are becoming more so- the German I met In Sontheru cure. Under tho impetus of freOjlndiana in tho campaign of 18G8. labor they have better anltnore'lle said tome that he used to bo ^^^^ I abundant crops, and the country'a Democrat, and that his wife was amon'Ttho barbarous nations" of!war had made a desolation'a Democrat yet, and that when ho the earth. Our party wiped out »^^i^^^^rness is now giving started to the Kepublican tneet-the foul blot. Wo claim that evidence of thrift and - - - .......r. .„..w. v...... ut.u..  ___________________prosperityjing his wife said to him: "John,  glorious achievement arour"s, and ^^^^^ ^^ parallel in any former you prDmised mo that when  • nono who dare disDutc'P0'"'0d of her history.  there is ___________  our claim. The Democrats stood With tho blessings of peace will  lUJi VUV-W. J . ' " - ------- •  he two prcceeding days  ■JZ mi'rt .nf w'«'«'"'''"« Standard. - ¡gentleman to g» bathin,. W.  6-WÍ-  slavery was abolished you would eomo back and go mit me mit tho Democratic party." "Vat you tinks I said to her? I said, Betsy, I know I tid, but I tell you deui iu defense of oV nati^onallcnrerpriscs wrought out by-'thi Republican fellers have done so existence, after it had divided joint Uoi; skill a^nd c tho nation and set up another South and tho North, will bind,dem all the time. Government in our taidat, yet the two together'.vith tho baadsl, [Continued on »c ond prrye.^   

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