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Anderson Daily Bulletin Newspaper Archive: March 11, 1978 - Page 1

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   Anderson Daily Bulletin (Newspaper) - March 11, 1978, Anderson, Indiana                                 Saturday, March 11, 1978 Vol. 93 No. 204 Anderson, Indiana Price Fifteen Cents  Anderson, Alex nail down semifinal wins  Bulletin Staff Story Anderson survived a scare from a dogged Lapel outfit and Alexandria raced away from a sluggish Highland crew early as both moved into the finals of the Anderson sectional this morning.  The Indians overcame an early 12-3 deficit to sideline the Bulldogs by a 61-53 count, while Alexandria bolted to a 30-16 halftime lead enroute to a 73-56 decision over the Scots in the other semifinal matchup.  Alexandria was in command from the outset. While Highland went on a fruitless search for the basket — they failed tb score from the field in the first quarter — the Tigers jumped out to a 10-3 lead after one period.  That quickly became a 15-3 bulge as the Tigers scored five unanswered points at the outset of the second quarter, and then a 9-0 spurt midway through stanza two staked the Tigers to a hefty 24-8 advantage.  It was 30-16 at halftime, and the Tigers expanded that to 47-32 after three quarters.  The Scots, who hit just three-of-17 from the field in the first half, were led by Norm  Weather  Delph with 15 points. Alexandria placed five players in double figures, paced by Mark Wright’s 18 points. Richard Semon added 13, Dick Sizelove and Earl Almack a dozen apiece and John Breckenridge 10 for the Tigers.  It took Anderson two and a half quarters to shake off the determined Bulldogs. Lyle Kirtz’ layup off a Cedric Scott pass at the 4:09 mark of the third quarter gave the Indians their first lead of the game, 30-29.  Lapel took one final lead at 33-32 on two foul shots by Scott Boles at the 2:57 mark of the quarter. Kirtz put the Indians ahead for keeps with two foul shots at 2:41.  Anderson went on to lead by as many as seven, 40-33, until the stubborn Bulldogs closed the gap to 42-39 by the end of the third quarter. That was as close as Lapel would get.  Alex 73, Highland 56  Highland (56)  N. Delph..............•......... 4*15  Wumer......................... 5-8  Richie.......................... 1- 1 *  G. Delph........................ 3-10  Simon.......................... 0-2  Lawrence....................... 3-11  FGA FT-A PF TP  7- 9 3- 4  2- 4 5  Chance of showers tonight. Lows in the mid and upper 30s. Becoming partly cloudy Sunday. High in the low and mid 40s. Probability of precipitation 40 percent tonight. Yesterday's high, 38, overnight low, 13.  Crull Redfield...  Brown.....  Jones......  Suliis......  Hughes.  3- 7 1- 1 1- Í 0- 0 0- 0 0- 1  0-0    4 0-0    2  1-2    0 1- 2    1 0-0    0 00    0 0- 0  0- 0 0- 0  Totals........................21-57 14-21 18  Anderson led 59-46 with 2:10 remaining in the game, but once again Lapel roared back to within ''six, 59-53, late in the final quarter.  Lapel gave the Indians all they could handle in the first half. The Bulldogs gave no indication of slowing the games tempo down as they jumped to a quick 12-3 lead late in the first quarter. The Indians missed their first 10 field goal attempts of the game, with John Teague’s eight-footer at the 3:18 mark finally snapping .that shooting slump.  Lapel led 16-11 after the first quarter, and by a slim 25-24 count at halftime. The Bulldogs hit only four-of-11 shots in the second quarter, and two-of-eight shots in the third quarter as the Indians climbed back into the game.  The Indians were led by John Teague’s 18 points. Lapel placed three players in double figures with Jim Baker leading the way .with 15 points.  Anderson 61, Lapel 53  FG A FT-A PF TP  Alexandria (73)  Hefner.......................... 4-5 0-1    5    8  Wright.......................... 7-10 4- 5    0    18  Breckenridge................... 3-6 4-* 4    4    10  Almack......................... 3- 5 6- 7    3    12  Sizelove........................ 511 4-4    3    14  Semon.......................... 5-7 1-2    3    11  Säubert..................<...... 0-0 0-0    0    0  Campbell....................... 0-1 0-0    I    0  Studebaker..................... 0- o 0 0    0    0  Totals........................27-45 19-23    19    73  Highland......................... 3 13 16    24-56  Alexandria.......................10 20 17    26—73  Officials — Ken Correli, Craig Martin.  Anderson (61) FG A    FT-A i  Skaggs......................... 1-6    00  McNeese.......................6-14    0- 0  J. Teague....................... 7-10    4- 7  Scott........................... 3-8    0-0  S. Teague........................3-7    0 0  Kirtz........................... 2-4    2-3  Shannon........................ 2-4    3-5  Wyczawski..................... 2-3    0-0  Campbell.......................0-1    0-2  Johnson........................ o- 0    0-0  Totals........................26-57    9-17  Lapel (53) FGA    FT-A  Boles........................... 1-6    4-6  Stephenson..................... 4-9    2-2  Baker.................... ..... 6-11    3- 4  Fields..................•........4-7    2-2  Barker......................... 4-11    0- 1  Huntzingcr..................... o- 1    3-4  Heck........................... 0-1    1-2  Turner......................... o- o    0-0  Totals........................19-46    15 21  Anderson........................11    13 18  Lapel............................16    9 14  Officials: Steve Wilmer, Jerry Petro.  Michael A. llrtnvn  15 53 19—61 14—53  John Teague (33) and Lyle Kirtz (15) rebound against Lapel’s Tom Huntzinger  Inflation biggest economic problem  By MICHAEL DOAN Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — Faced with worsening inflation, the government now sees rising prices, rather than unemployment, as the nation’s biggest economic problem.  Administration officials in public statements are moving away from their previous stance that inflation and unemployment are problems of equal importance.  The government reported Friday that the unemployment rate dropped from 6.3 percent to 6.1 percent in February. But wholesale prices rose by 1.1 percent last month, the largest increase in three years. And economists predicted that supermarket prices will keep going up.  “Inflation is the major problem,” Treasury Secretary W. Michael Blumenthal said flatly at an American Newspaper Association Convention session Friday.  He said the administration is not proposing economic programs that would over-stimulate the economy. Job-creating programs are often criticized for overheating the economy, contributing to inflation.  Blumenthal’s comments were echoed by Federal Reserve Chairman G. William Miller, who when he was nominated last fall said both problems were equally important.  At a congressional hearing Thursday, Miller said he now con  siders inflation the biggest problem and plans to give it a “very, very high priority” at the Fed.  Congress also is turning its attention to the rising prices. House Democrats earlier this week agreed to add anti-inflation language to the Humphrey-Hawkins bill, which is aimed at reducing unemployment.  Rep. Robert Giaimo, D-Conn., chairman of the House Budget Committee, said he agrees with Republicans that fighting inflation  should get equal priority with creating jobs.  The government’s new stress on inflation over unemployment has drawn fire from labor leaders, \yho maintain the twin goals of reducing unemployment and controlling inflation are not contradictory. They note that the country had both high unemployment and high inflation during the mid-1970s recession.  “Through programs designed to put people to work, we can have  reasonable controls*on inflation and still reduce unemployment,” AFL-CIO spokesman John Zaluski said Friday.  It is not clear what the emphasis on fighting inflation will mean for government programs. The Carter administration has proposed extensive tax cuts to stimulate the economy and eventually create more jobs. It also has proposed a voluntary anti-inflation program, but has ruled out wage and price controls as unworkable.  Who’s got a dime?  Some college stunts never go out of style. Who can get the most people in a phone booth is still a challenge that students at Mount Mercy • College here will accept. This team of 11 called the “squee-zeable nurses” won a keg of beer and the contest. Six teams competed.  Coal miners remain idle  Legal hassles delay state work orders  By The Associated Press  It appeared that southern Indiana’s coal mines would remain idle through the weekend after mistakes with legal paperwork Friday left federal marshals unable to serve back-to-work orders at the state’s United Mine Workers offices.  “Until I see a copy of it (the back-to-work order), we’re still on strike,” vowed UMW District 11 president Larry Reynolds at his Terre Haute office. After waiting in vain for the expected papers, Reynolds said he was leaving for his Dugger home for the weekend.  The papers are required to be served by 4:30 p.m. Monday.  Although a temporary restraining order against the 95-day strike was issued Thursday night in  Washington, by the end of working hours Friday, a required court paper accidentally omitted by the Justice Department was still being flown from Washington.  In addition, Virginia Dill McCarty, U.S. attorney for southern Indiana, said marshals still had to prepare a document for defendants to sign, certifying they had been served with the court order.  Under provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act, invoked Monday by President Carter, the back-to-work order must be served individually on each of Indiana’s 22 UMW locals, the District 11 headquarters, two mines and 10 contractors — as well as more than 1,400 other defendants nationally.  Once the court orders are delivered, however, there is no guarantee the miners will return to  work — whether over the weekend or later.  “I don’t think miners have ever been required to work on weekends, so I doubt they would go back before Monday,” Mrs. McCarty said.  William J. Watt, Gov. Otis R. Bowen’s chief energy adviser, agreed with her and added, “I expect a bit of a waiting game for a day or so eveai after the order is effective.”  Watt said miners might ignore the order in the hope that President Carter would seize the mines, although Carter has said he isn’t considering government takeover of the mines. He added that a survey 10 days ago showed that coal already mined in the state and  awaiting shipment would total about a week’s supply for Indiana utilities.  Meanwhile, Amax Coal Co., which has 11 mines with 2,500 UMW members in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky, said it was ready to resume operations.  Amax spokesman Doug Matyka said the mines were open “and prepared to receive workers immediately. We’re not going to worry about shift times. If a miner who normally works the night shift < comes in during the day, he can go right to work.”  Matyk said there is at least 1,000 tons of coal “ready to be broken out and moved” and the Amax surface mines and some of them have up to 12,000 tons awaiting shipment.  ‘Hoosier Hysteria 9  continues  By TOM WATSON Bulletin Staff Writer  AT THE WIGWAM - Virtually all of the 9,000 seats here were filled at 9 a.m. when the referee tossed up the jump ball to begin the Anderson-Lapel game.  For the second week in a row, competition in the local boys’ basketball sectional got off to an early morning start (ordained by the serious electricity shortage), but many kilowatts of excitement were shooting through the Wigwam nevertheless.  One life-long basketball fan visiting Anderson today for the sectional is Phil Eskew, commissioner of the Indiana High School Athletic Association for 14  years before he retired a year-and-a-half ago.  “I’ve got a lot of friends here,” Eskew said, when asked why he was here. But he quickly added the main reason. “I just .enjoy ballgames.”  The former commissioner said he didn’t really see the point of having the tournament games in the morning to conserve electricity.  “My theory on that is this," Eskew said. “They have to use lights to play anyway, so why not play at night?”  When asked for a comment on the almost season-long dispute about whether Richard Kriss should play basketball for Highland High School (the matter  was debated in a courtroom more than once), Eskew said he hasn’t been following the case that closely.  But referring to high school basketball in general, Eskew said, “I don’t think it’s a judge’s business. I think it’s a school administrator’s business.”  Despite his current “retirement,” Eskew said he still goes into his former office in Indianapolis at least once a week. And he still attends all the high school and college basketball games he can find. As he prepared to take his seat for the morning round of games, Eskew added, “Tomorrow I'm going to  See Page 5, Column 3   

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