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Albion New Era: Thursday, December 4, 1884 - Page 1

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   Albion New Era (Newspaper) - December 4, 1884, Albion, Indiana                                 'r  • , Ji^ ^ . ......... ........  TWO mLL:ilRS A YETIR.  to t2xe XAxie; JLtrnt t3M dkJLp« T^aOl wlxexe tSxasr  VOL XIIl NO. n.  »  ALBION, NOBLE COUNTY, INDIANA, DECEMBER 4, 1884.  NEW SERIES. VOL IX NO. 50-  — THE *  BEST TONIC. I  This medicine, combining Iron with puTe Tcgetable Cnrea r imjtare]  ""firSo^SSung remedy for Diseases of the KSdaej« mmà uVer. ^  It 1« invaluable for Diseases peculiar to tromsB, and all who lead eedenUry lives.  11 does not injure the teeth, cause headache.or produce constipation—oiAer Iron medicineê do.  Itenrlchesand purifies the blood, stimulates the apMtite, aids the assimilation of food, re-liwes Heaitbom and Belching, and stiength-ens the mtiscles and nerves.  For Intermittent Fevers, Lassitude, Lack of Energy. &c., it has no equal.  49* The genuine has above trade mark a^d crossed red lines on wrapper. Take no other.  CBOWI OUaiCAL CO, lALTMOKE.  KENTUCKY TIANSPARENCIES.  THE FUTURE OF THE NEGRO IN AMERK».  'DOWN WITH TARIFF; FREE TRADE AND A PROSPEROUS SOUTH."  "Down with Ytnkot Manufacturing nopollM."  Mo  no  More Taxes to Ponsion tbo Soldiers who Pliindered Us."  AYER'S  Ctoerfy Poefcoral  Ko other eomp'.aints are so insidions in their  Mtaek as those aiiectins tbe throat and hingst none so^riflcd witU by the majority of suffer* ers. The orJiiiary cough or cold, rcsuiting perhaps from a tililmg or uiiccMiscioos ea> posore, is often Lut tUe bcgiuuiug of a fatal •ickness. Aviir.'s Ciir.iir.y I ixtoual has veU proven its eCcacy in a. forty yearn* flgbS vith throat a:.d iung diicaircs, uuU should be takoii in all cases wiiiiout delay.  A Terrible Congh Cared.  "In 1F571 took n. sex t t c ro'.ti, v »licli r ffccted my luii^s. 1 l¡aü u ten coii¿;lu :u tl |>:ii»ed ni-^'bt flSlur uijilil w Uhoiit tlet p. i lie úuctors (;a\<;me «j». 1 uk l AvKr.'j CcEi.i v I'EC-ÏOU.VI, which relieved my luugs, im'.uced alcuik, Hiid ntfordcd me the rest ueceBsary for tlM5 iccovtry of my stienglli. iJy the continued use of tlio Pix it\UAi. a |u;rnia-»»ciit cure was cflectc«!. J i.ia now tó years Old, Imie »lid lieui ty, tuid uiii buliftüed your CUEUUV rtCTuüAI. e;ivetl inc.  lIoUACK Faií:I;UOTHEB."  Sockingham, \U, ^uly 15, iu ¿.  Crovp. —A Mother'« Trl1>nt«.  "\rhile in the countrj' Inst \vm fr my little bo^.tliree yer.rsold, v:>si;iWeii i'i iih Vroup; it Mseuied as if lie woiiKl «lie t-oii', «iniuga-lation. One of tlie fainily shvh otu-d tiie us* of Avku's Chkiiuv l^kctoi ai., .1 bottle of <irhich was alw:ty;< krjit in t!>e iiouse. This tKis tried in iiiiiull and fri-(;ueiit doses, and to our delight in Uian liuH an liour th* little pavienl v:is lin ailj iij'fwíüy. Tlie doc-tmt said tliai iliu ( lii iikv l i ('toral had HummI «►>• d:irl>i.g's iifo. Can you uuuùer at our gratiiuue? biiic< rely < c i¡is>,  w us." j ?¡ v a Gedkçy."  ue Wast 128th St., ^e\v \ ork, ilay 16, 1882.  ••I luwe ngc4 Aver's Cuj-rrv Pectoiiai.-fa niy family for scvcml yeaií¡, atid do not hesitate to inoiioiinco il tlie n ost effectuât remedy iof cuuglis and colds «e iiave ever tried. A. d. ckanb."  Lake CrysUl. Minn., March i;i, 1662.  " I suffered for eight ycnrs from Bronchitis, •ud after lr>ii.g iiiiiny rcineoi' f with no suo-eess, 1 was cured Ly the usf oí A vi m's Che»-  bv pk« tokal. j<'s!;rii waujeü."  Byhalia, Miss., April 5,  "l cannot «fv erotiph in praise of ATEB'e Chkruv I'lXTuit/I,. l>e;ievii.j: as I do that but for its use I siiOuJd luu^ »ii.ce liave died froui iuiig troubles. >'. Bkaqoos."  Palestiiie, 1 ci.is, April 22,  Ko case of an affection of the throat or  ktags exists which cannot be greatly ralievsd hVi^the use of Aveb's Chec&t Pectorai^ and.It will always curt vrhen the disease M »Dt already beyond the control of medicine.  rBni'ABED BT  DrJ.C.Ayer&Co., Lowell, Matt.  8tâd by aU Dmegists.  r tonas. A certain cure. Tîot expensive. Ttara* IS* iroKtmem in ono paokuict». Good for ~lead. HeMacbe. IKrEitiem, Hmy Fever, Sc.  PISO'S REMEDY FOR CATARRH  Has been thoroughly tested during the past five years with such unifprmly good results that the medicine is now offered for sale wiUi a certainty that it will prove to be the Branedy for Catabrh n^dli has been so long sought for  A man from the north who was at Providence, Kentucky, when a joli-fication was held over tho election of Cleveland and Hendricks, says, in writing to the Fort Wayne News, that transparencies were carried bearing the mottoes given in the head lines to this article. A speech was made by Polk Lafoon, who had just been elected to congress from that district, in whi(^ he said:  "Fellow citizens and Democrats, Kentuckyians, sons of the Sunny South, let ns rejoice and be exceeding glad; our day has come at last After a dark and gloomy night of nearly a quarter of a century, the day dawns and the clouds begin to lift and roll away; after twenty-four years of bondage the most abject bondage, the northern mudsills and abolitionists, and the southern nigger, our day of deliverance has at last arrived. By a Solid South, aided by a few northern States, Cleveland and Herdricks have been elected, and by all the gods we will not again be defrauded of our hard earned victory. Backed by every loyal Democrat, every true son of the south, Grover Cleveland, will if necepsary, march through blood to Washington; where on the 4th of March nest, he will don the purple and assume the reign of government, in spite of all the pow ers in heaven, earth or hell. Our fair land, long suffering, torn anc bleeding, too long has bowed beneath tho yoke of oppression; too long have we tamely submitted to fraud, cor raption and mitrale. Not content with robbing us of our niggers, burning and plundering our homes and desolating our land; we have for long years been bowed down with heavy burdens to enrich Yankee manufact urers, and to pay exhorbitant wages to Yankee niggers. Henceforth these fellows will find that they must labor for such wages, as the same class of beings in Europe are glad to accept, or do worse. The public domain has been given away to Yankee sol diers, Yankee railway companies, anc. to Yankee monopolists generally. This too most cease. Let us hope also; that the day is not far distant, when we will no longer be taxed to pension the hoard of cut-throats who over-run and laid waste our fair sun ny land, as did the lice and frogs of Egj'pt, while our own brave defend ers go um-ewarded."  An Editor's Tribute.  Thereon P. Eeatw, editor of the Fort Wayne, Ind., Gazette, writes "For the past five yewrs have always used Dr. King's New Discovery for coughs of most severe character, as well as those of milder type. It nev er fails to effect a speedy cure. My friends to wh(nn I baverecommendeci it speak of it in the same high terms Having been cured by it of every cough I have had for five years, consider it the only reliable and sure cure for coughs, colds, etc." Call at Huston & Molen's and get a free trial bottle. Large size f 1.00.  AesMaiBeai«^ Hotazpeashre tim iPSK toi oee pieki^ Good for Om lac^. OiaiiliM^ Uar V^er.Ae. . all Urtm^m». or IrrinalL X. T. US^TI^ Wama. «k  —fob sale by—  A L. STONM, ALBION, IND.  Or. A.  .i AMKKICAir  \ '^vnuc.  I IVIKMI; AX ^-urmrsT. I ItBlMBt II cMetod for intemsi m mB ----------clMto mofftae. folM  "SBsn  Youno ladies in Iowa who are about to entor into the marrii^ re Iati(m with mea of intemperate hab its, will be interested in the fact that the supreme court has said to one who was seddng release by divorce from a man of that character:'  "You have Tolontarily diosen drunkard for a hnsband, and you should discharge the duties of drunkard's wife. His taOure to keep a pledge of refoirmataon made bdbre marriage does not ju^fy you in deserting him. Haying knowingly mar ried a dmnksrd, you mnat nuke yonr-sdf content with the sacred religion ship.'»  Tbomas a. HxmBicata came hcnae from his xeMni pilgfiinag» to tb» Eaafr with a ir«t7 UtcIj flea In 1m ew. *1iDBiiDii8^ hm iMfoad ihaiWin't  '^ignmmtmM^Bimiti" iiiiwi  land]«failMptfi«; lloorTm^.  amOBSTIVE CORRESPONDBNCB.  What the future may have in store for the colored people of this conn-try, is- a problem yet to be solved. That this important question to that unfortunate race is now agitating the minds of the colored people of the south, is painfully evident Appre-lensions of impending evil are prev alent among them. In many sections this amounts to absolute terror and alarm. Reasoning from cause to effect, the cause of this terrorism is readily disclosed. The democratic party has been successful at t^e polls, and in a few months will be in possession of the machinery of government They are placed in that position by the votes of the solid south. i was the solid south that clung so tenaciously to the system of human slavery that to make it national it plunged the country into one of the bloodiest wars the world ever saw.  Looking to the past, and then peering into the dim and dark vista of the future, the negro sees no ray of sun light or of hope to him or his race. He looks back over the past quarter of a century in the history of this country, and that under the last democratic administration, his condition was that of a slave. To continue him in that condition, he saw the war waged for the destruction of the fairest government on the face oi: the earth. He saw vast armies meet face to face in deadly strife. He saw men dying on the skirmish line, in bloody trenches, and at the cannon's mouth. These men died for a principle. And what was the principle for which each fought and suffered and died? On one side men were arrayed under the banner of the free. They believed that "all men were created free and equal," and for this principle they met death on the gory battlefield. On the other side men were arrayed under a strange banner. They waged a relentless warfare, and for what ? For the establishment of a new government on the ruins of the proudest republic on the face of the globe, in which human slavery was the very foundation stona  Right triumphed in the end, and tibe new government went down. Its demise proved almost the death knell of the democratic party. The republican party, under which the war for the Union—for equal rights, and equal and exact justice to all men— was waged, began to shape the des tinies of the republic. It was the edict of a republican president, backed by the moral sentiment of the great republican party, that said that slavery should dia It was the democratic party that entered its feeble protest It was the operation of this edict of the immortal Lincoln, speaking from the great heart of the republican party, that caused the galling chains of slavery to fall from the limbs of the negro race in Amercia, (chains that they had leom through centaries of injustice and ymxag) and made them free men. It was the democratic party tiiat again entered its feeble protest to this usurpation of rights, as it characterized it, and said that the negro ought not to be free—that slavery was his ncnnal condition, and in that condition he onght to be maintained.  New York Tribune.  It is not generally known that the following interesting correspondence recently took place:  Indianapolis, Nov. 20,1884. My Dear Grover:—I've been thinking the matter over with a good deal of care since election, and have reached the conclusion that it is nec-essary to the success of the next ad-ministratien that our firm name should be Hendricks & Co., you to figure as a silent partner. Let me mow how the suggestion seems to strike you. Affectionately yours.  H*IiDK*CKS.  To President-elect Cleveland.  The Leading Clothing House in Indiana.  ««  LITTLE  T  • ITHE i E  JOE>  »»  01 PU G  e oooooooooooooeooooooooooooooooooooooooo o  J  iim  R!  'fi  o ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 4  Albany, Nov. 23,1884. ' My Dear Tom:—Yours of the 20th received and contents noted. In reply I would say that an evening or two since, while diverting myself from official cares with a little good poetry, I came across these lines in a poem of Dr. Holmes:  "I thank you, Mr. President, you've kindly broke the ice;  Virtue should always be the first—I'm only second Vice—  A Viet t$ iomtiktng with a $crtw ihat'$ madt to hoUiUjaw.  The singular felicity of this definition of a Vice impressed me exceedingly—its a sort of a screw, a Vice is, and it was "made to hold its jaw." Affectionately yours,  __Cl*v*l*nd.  To ti^Vice.^^^1 President-elect Hendricks.  Overcoats, Overcoats, Overcoats! Suits, Suits, and Suits!  We have just received a large line of  CLOTHING-,  made up and trimmed in very best of styles  It would be an easy matter for those papers that are denouncing Mr. Blaine's speech at Augusta, Maine, to show the falsity of his statements, if they are untrue. Snch a course would be much more satisfactory to their readers. In the states named, thousands of votes did not materialize and did not count in determining the result If they were cast, they were not counted. If they were not cast there is a reason why the voters remained away from the polls. The people are thinking of these things, and some satisfactory explanation is demanded.  Looking back upon the record the democratio party upon this qnes-ticm of hnman freedom, is there not great cause for alarm, whrai the col oared man sees that the government is turned over to the very men who sought to maintain him in perpetual Bsrvitudef The democratio party may have repented in sMkdotii and aslksa of its nn% but il is pndmA ttwl Hw mgnm of sontli are ooi eoa^ tino^ that tfae eoavenrioiiia fenaioa  ^ Womea wilh pa!«, ookrlMi Imm, «rlio £m1 meak and disooimwtd, vril ì^mmMvkàha^r  (T'a iron tiM blood, mtÍm  GENTS'  ^A very large line of:3  Tl  S  i GOODS,  Lowest Prices and best of Styles.  Our line of KC^TS dC is very larg:e.  PRICES TO SUIT EVERYBODY.  TRUNKS ^^^ VALISES IN GREAT VARIETY.  Lawbence, Kansas, is making an effort to have the citizeM of that place who lost private property in the border wars from 1854 to 1860, reimbursed. Estimates place such losses at about 15,000,000. The plan seems to be to have the state issue bonds for that amount, which are to be eventually taken up by the general government Lawrence suffered terribly in those border wars, and we do not wonder that some effort is being made to have her citizens reimbursed or snch losses.  Thomas A. Hendricks is not a popular man in Indiana. He has been defeated twice for governor and was elected to that position by a majority of less than 1,000. In the campaign of 1884, he lacked several hundreds of having as large a plurality as Isaac P. Gray, who Vas elected governor of the state. Four years as vice-president will lay away in obscurity the great American Straddler.  It is said that Cleveland looks favorably upon the suggestion that Sen-ator Bayard, of Delaware, should occupy a seat in his cabinet as secretary of state, and Senator Garland, of Arkansas, in one of the other posi-ti(m& The president-elect has great confidence in the men named, and would not hesitate to trust Uiem in shainng the policy of his administra-ti<nL  —^Pbicklbt Ash Bittkbs is an unfailing specific for all complains arising from a derangement of the fanotionsof the Liver. It purifies the blood and infuses new life into the invalid. Pains in the side, general nneasiness, loss of appetite, head aehe, biUous attacks, ke., are Biure ii^ieations that a ix>rrective is nMded. iPaicuv Ash Bitrbs is es-peeiaHy adapted frar these It •WQs^e a torpid Uvw to action and condition;  I^Fie are hound to undersell everybody in our line, because our expeims are light. i^fTe guarantee everybody a good fit or no sale. Goods warranted as represented or mon-eg will be refunded. Everything sold at  ROOK BOTTOM PRICES.  H^We guarantee to S:i VE you 25 per cent, on every dollars worth of goods you buy of us. Try us and be convinced.  i^We thank all our customers for past favors, and we hope ev-everybody will patronize us in the future. Don't Forget the Place,^^  Old Clapp Building, ^ITDiOrL, laad--  HIRSCHFIELD & PERITZ.  T. POPHAM & CO.,—Philadelphia, Penn.  phpu a tir'<\ asthma specific . rurn/iJVl o astama specific  nsiinniHiSiiiiiiiiHsiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiijiniii For the Cure of Asthma.  established  eirtbial package free  m  T. POPHiUi ft CO., Prop's., Philadelphia. INSTANTLY RELIEVEQ.  _ Do not f»ll to tr>' this splendid preparation if you have dllBcult breathing ftwrn ?eTer, or Chronic Bronchitis. It Is a pleasunt InhalingKhtnlng going at once to the _ _ disease; removing the mucus o^ phlegm, relaxing the iightning of the ebest, promotingexMrtonir  Put up In large boxes, «ncam lijr  Hay  fbe  tiou. and giving Immediate and positive relief in every ease, druggists everywhere.  oclMMne  Ms! Mo!  YOU KNOW MEÌ  liOiNilii  J  J  rS MY XAME!  ■I  Livery & Feed^Stablei  carriages FOB business ob pubisubb; sample wagons fob  COMMEBOAL IISM. AND QENTLE TEAMS FOB LADIES.  I WOML AT  - At % the X Old X School x Building.  TEfíMS REASONABLE!  Barn on Jefferson St.,  Northof Court Hoose, -{ )■ ALBIOK. IKp E3D. EnfcTGWliB, »^CO]^ f  it  Narcolinel  NarcoliRel  laatanndUvertoi xwtonaittoahealthy  IjttPQMf'"'  democrats io' presi-I ivas d  —For ths IUb1«m SxtraettoD of—  1?eot3aI "Xeetín.!  ^▼élitloli at  Gsa s. Jo^^mo2l,  tkiai  WWAIWL  mm.  mi  M   

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