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Albion New Era: Thursday, September 25, 1884 - Page 1

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   Albion New Era (Newspaper) - September 25, 1884, Albion, Indiana                                    TWO DOLLARS :>î YE:ÍR.    to tlxe Xjixie; X^et tli.e Olxips FsbU -T:(rla.ere    LY äDVA^'CE.      VOL XIII NO. I.    ALBION, NOBLE COUNTY, INDIANA, SEPTEMBER 25, 1884.    NEW SERIES. VOL. IX NO. 40.     GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. HATS, CAPS. TRUNKS, VALISBS. KTO.  L W. WELKER.  ATTORNEY-AT-UW and NOTARY PUBLIC,  Albion, Indiana.  QBt«OfHce up stairs in Glapp's Block.  AFRAID TO PACE THE MUSIO.  AN ENTHUSIASTIC GATHERING.  WOLF UKE ENUVENED BY TORCHES, BANNERS, AND A BLAZE OF ENTHUSIASM.  THOMAS M. EELLS ADDRESSES FUUY 1,000 PEOPLE.  Poit-Raiting and Torch-Light Proceuion.  The simple annonncoment of the fact in The New Eba, and tho posting of a few bills, that Thomas M. Eells, of Albion, would address the people of Wolf Lake and vicinity on the political issues of the day, brought out an immense crowd at^at place on Saturday evening of J|st week—in fact such a crowd as never before seen in the beautifiy ^fttle village of Wolf Lake at a ^l^cal meeting. In company with JoIA C. Vought, our popular candidal for recorder, we repaired to ifan^p^e in tho afternoon, and gqt; ^h^:^ just in |imo to see one of the J^e^t ^les ij< Noble county raisedf on| wEch, of ore than 100 feet from tlie | ^ound, floats a streamer beanng^ tha names of the next presidesit and ^ce-president of the United States—piaine and Logan. The polf is l^/€opt in height,  townsman, the willing L  GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. HATS, CAPS. TRUNKS, VALISBS. KTO.  L W. WELKER.  ATTORNEY-AT-UW and NOTARY PUBLIC,  Albion, Indiana.  QBt«OfHce up stairs in Glapp's Block.  piELDING PUICKETT,  •••■■•••Attorney-at-Law,--.-  Albion, Indiana.  Omce on York Street, directly West or Court House lyl  is now in full blast with an entire stock of  •pHOS. B. FELKNER,  ■•■••■: Attorney-at-Law,::::  Albion, Indiana.  Office up stairs In John D. Bliick's New Block. 22tt.  GENT  procession portion of  H  ats & Caps,:  —which comprises—  G LOT HING.  U R N I S H I * =:Trunks & ValiseS  qOODS,  O^We will sell them CHEAPER THAN ANYBODY EVER SOLD THEM IN ¡ALBION BEFORE, and we Guarantee you a Fit or no Sale.  OTJDR OOOIDS  and was rais^ by Elijah Coats, |assisi hundreds whl wen  At dark a tor<A-ligh took place, Ha whsh wer< the First Voters fef AlbJn and York townships, and/of LiAnier, led by the Wolf LakelBand, m ihe Ligonier and Albion Obrps. In this  procession pere were about 200 torches, and^^ey made a fine display as they matched through the streets wid to the stand where fully 1,000 quiet, orderly people were congregated to hear the political issues of the day discussed. The stand was tastefully decorated with flags, Chinese lantemd, evergreens, and flowers, showing that the patriotic ladies of Wolf Lake had superintended this part of the arrangements. After music by the Wolf Lake Band, and songs by the Ligonier and Albion Glee Clubs, Mr. John P. Kitt, member of the county central committee for Noble township, introduced the speaker—Thomas M. Eells, of Albion —who for more than hour held that audience spell-bound by his eloquence and masterly arguments in favor of republican doctrines and principles, and of the men who are our standard-bearers in this campaign. At the dose of his remarks, he was greeted by a round of cheers and applause. The exercises closed with singing by the Glee Clubs, wjiich also, was loudly applauded. We never saw a more orderly or well-behaved andiencei, nor a more attentive one, showing that the people are alive to the importance of the issues at stake, and the immense gathering at Wolf Lake shows that the good people of Noble township—true men and Noble women as they are—will do their duty to their country in this campaign.  Boms as Barttneters.  ••By Oeovge! I knew that raw snap was coming the (^l^r day; felt it in my bonee. Bhenmatism beata^l the btrcMnetera," he said. Bat^-romeletB are the cheapest in the end. Mwcury in a glass tabe is safer and more adaitific thanl aoid m the veins. Qet rid iof your rfaeamatinn by using Parirar'8 Tcmie, and trust the Signal Servkse umii to predict dianges in the weather. The Tonic has restrar ed the limbs of many a rhenmi^c flufreror to their natnral usea It is pleuant, pnrvadve and powerful  0SS. Tbomas Ewna, of Ohio, an oiioompnxiUBing democrat,who knows Mr. Bliin^of idioai lie is a kioamaa, WKf of the repaUicu candidate: "I don't believe H eveiir letter he ever wrote and every word he ever uttered  1 .1  iL IO «M 11  We will Save you 25 per cent, on Every  IDOUJLiJiŒÔ irOTJ  ^-^^E ^IM TO DPLEASE  VERYBODY.:  Call and see our Stock before purchasing elsewhere. You be convinced if you call and see our g:oods.  will  Men Suits, Youths Suits, Boys Suits, Children s Suits,  OVERGO ATS FOR EVERYBODY.^^ VERY LOW PRICES  REMEMBER THE PLACE—Ciapp's Building, Albion, Indiana.  HIRSCHFIELD & PERITZ.  HARDWARE, TINWARE, STOVES. ETC.-J. J. MARTIN.  AFRAID TO PACE THE MUSIO.  Bob Lowry Has 8ome Harrow-insr Reminiscences of Joint Political Discussions.  -yyiLlJAM T. GREEN, M. D-  izPHYSIClAN & SURGEON.:  E^Ofilce over Huston & Molen's store. ALBION,................INDIANA  And Will Not Toe the Mark in a Joint Debate with Ther-on P. Keator.  A Modem Political Dombey.  D  R. PICKETT.  HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN,  Special attention Riven to chronic diseases and diseases of women and cliildren. Ofllce on Main street, 3d Door East of Bank, Albion, Indiaiiii. 27yl  DENTIST  Ligonier, Ind.  ^^iLLINQ TKETH A SPKCIALTV.  Worden Post, No, 205. G. A. R.  Regular meetinRs second and fourth Satui-days In each inontii.  D. A. SCHAFF, Com.  8. R. EASTEKDAY, Adj't. WM. TRUMP, Quartkkmastrr.  J^ORTH STAR LODGE.  No. 380, ^^^^ '*  ALBION, INDIANA.  Regular meetings every Tuesday evening.  E. L. TEEQAKDEN, N. 6. .1. CoCKLKY, Sec'y.  rrootlOL I Teetl^. 1  GEORGE E. JOHNSON.  SURGEON DENTIST  .A-l"teioaa., Iixd-ia-xxa,.  Special attention given to both Surgical and Thkuai'UKTIcal treatment of aB disesesof the mouth and associate parts. Office, East Main Street. 2yl  -^^^ILLIAMS KCOUSE.  Albion, Indiana, RICHARD WILLIAMS, PropW.  lis IS CAI M Wi  and wheat is low, but our prices on  This House is entirely new—is of brick, and is com|iletely furnished througliout. Good Sample Rooms for commercial n)en.  Main Strekt, South ok Couuthousk.  v7n7vi  fatten on iiim ji «ogle act or tiioi^M of iïŒdal «omiptioa."  STOVES ;|i tinware;  will more than equal the LOW PRICES of wheat and oats.  ^DON'T LOSE ANY TIME,  but come and get the benefit offered at the  NEW HARDWARE ALBION. INDIANA.  T. T. li-C^SBTIItT.  BUQGT rOH S&LB-J. D. BERQER.  ID- SSSO-BX^ .iâJL'bioxx.  ^—  Are now prepared to do  Carriage, Buggy and W^on Blacksmithing & Horseshoeing.  If Domboy, sen., as pen-pictured by Dickens, in "Domboy and Son," was typical of the austere and aristo cratic Englishman, whose superabundance of dignity rendered him cold and indifferent to the rights and feelings of those by whom he was surrounded, so might we class the present representative in congress from this district, who, in more senses than one, is tho counterpart of tho Dombey of Dickens creation. "Our Bob," when it is to his interest to do so, can discount in assumed "dignity" that of the English aristocrat, and judging by his congi'essional record on the tariff question, his sympathies and feelings are as thoroughly English as were those of the central figure in Dickens' talo. Referring to the challenge of Theron P. Keator, for a joint discussion of the tariff question in this district, and to which Bob does not deign to reply, the Ft. Wayne Journal—"Our Bob's" organ —says:  Everbody smiles at thé presumption of the republican candidate for Congress, in challenging a man of Judge Lowry's ability to a joint discussion.  To this the Gazette replies as fol lows:  The Gazette would respectfully call the attention of the Hon. Robert Lowry, the valiant Republican bouncer, to the challenge sent to him by Mr. Theron P. Keator, which has appeared in the columns of the Gazette. Will the great bouncer pass by this challenge unnoticed, and thereby acknowledge his inability to cope with Mr. Keator on the stump? The air of great superiority and an overabundance of imaginary dignity will not fill the bill. They are an imaginary affair and exist only in the mind's eye of Mr. Lowry and have no existence in reality. The people of the Twelfth district are well aware of this fact The way to show his superiority and dignity is to accept the challenge, and Uke a man appear before the people and in the broad light of day discuss the issues now pending before the people. Mr. Lowry can explain to the people his vote on the Morrison bill, the effects the bill would have had on the commerce, industry and price of labor in this country. There is no use trying to dodge this issue. The farmers want to know of Mr. Lowry what he meant when he voted to reduce the tariff on wool still another twenty per cent The farmers would like to hear from him, when his competitor is with him on the stump, pmtting these cnotty questions squarely before him. That is the true way to answer and dispose of this issue. It will admit of no dodging or equivocation. Mr. Lowry is an artful dodger. He  That free trade would break down the manufacturing industries of this country is a proposition that the most ardent free trader will not deny. With that policy operative in this country the millions of men engaged in manufacturing would be driven into agricultur al pursuits and thus become producers, themselves, and the products of the farmers of the United States would have to find a market in other countries. With protection to American industries, as advocated by the ropublican party, 02 per cent of all farm products aro consumed at home, while but 8 per cent are exported. Adam Smith, in his "Wealth of Nations," says that "whatever tends to diminish the number of artificers and manufacturers t«nds to diminish the home market, the most important of all markets, for the rude products of land, and thereby to discourage agriculture." This is what democratic free trade would do. Farmers, do you want to see your homo markets destroyed ?  On Wednesday of last week an accident occtirred on the I. B. & W. railroad, near Farmer City, Illinois, by which the train left the track and tumbled down an embankment. A special car was attached in which were Thomas A. Hendricks, democratic candidate for vice-president, and a number of other distinguished democrats. Col. Messmore, of Grand Rap • ids, Michigan, a democrat who has spoken in other campaigns, in this county, was one who was considerably injured. John C. Shoemaker, of the Indianapolis Sentinel, was also bruised up some. Mr. Hendricks escaped with a few slight scratehes.  The free trade doctrines of the democratic party are alarming the planters of Louisiana, and many of. the most influential of them will support Blaine and Logan. Louisiana may yet be redeemed from democratic misrule.  Special attention given to  zPAlNTING and REPAIRING! Buggies, Top, Sign-Painting, &c. &c. &c.  S^^Remember the place (old ing,) Corner Hazel and  ind.  school build-Uberty streets, Albion  S, KL ICOiTICLiE.  IsTEW IBTÒXai^  Livery & Feed-Stable.  GARBIAQE8 fob BUSINESS or PLEASUBB; SAMPLE WAGONS fob  COMMERCIAL MEN, AND GENTLE TEAMS FOB LADIES.  TERMS REASONABLE!  Barn on Jefftrson St.,  Nortii of Oouit House, O ALBION, IND  Mr. Gough on Silk Hats.  "It would be no violation of the commandment," said John B. Gough, "if a man were to fall down and worship the silk hat, for it is not made in the likeness of any thing in heaven, or on earth, or in the waters which are under the earth." Besides it heats the head and cause the hair to fall off. Parker's Hair Balsam will stop that and restore the original color to gray or faded hair. Not oily, not a dye, benficial, deliciously perfumed. A perfect hair dressing. 50c. All druggists-  dodged the vote when the question of t^ing up the tariff bill was before congress. We believe he claimed he was busy at the time franking patent office reports to Democratic constituents, or something of that sort  If Mr. Lowry has too much dignity to discuss these questions wi^ his competitor on the stamp, the probabilities are that his constituents will conclude that he is entirely too dignified to represent them in congress, and will send Mr. Keator there to look after their interesta Mr. Lowry, on the whole, is a man altogether after the English heart A regular CJomishman and is a true representa tive of the English interest in the American congress. The English might hunt the empire over, and wl^e they might find thousands of men having indefinitely more ability, they would find no one more true and loyal to her interests than "Onr Bob."  Mr. Lowry has a fine opportunity presented to right himself before his constituents, to show his ability and superiority in intellect, oratory and tact as a debator, by accepting Mr. Keator's challenge. Will he come forward boldly and meet the issue, or  FIRE!  LIGHTNING! CYCLONES!  Protect Your Homes!  AGAINST FIRE, LIGHTNING«iEl  g^^ND CYCLONES, —= BY a POLICY OF ^—  INSURANCE  ^ FRANK CLAPP,  who represents the following BELLA-1 INSURANCE COMPANIES:  BLE  JíORTH áMERW:!^  Ins. Co., F'hiladeîphia, Pa.  CO.VTIXEJv'TäL^  Ins. Co., Xew York City.  SPRINGFIELD F. &  Ins. Co., Sprindfield, Mass.  Ins. Co., Hartjord Conn.  PHŒXIXj&T^  Ins. Co., Harford, Conn.  QERMîfiX âMERlCày^ Ins. Co., Xm Tori City.  Ins. Co., Indianaptm^ Ind   

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