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Mount Carmel Semi Weekly Item Newspaper Archive: May 30, 1900 - Page 1

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Publication: Mount Carmel Semi Weekly Item

Location: Mount Carmel, Illinois

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   Mount Carmel Semi Weekly Item (Newspaper) - May 30, 1900, Mount Carmel, Illinois                                 VOL. XlIl.-NO. 43  MOUNT CARMEL, PA.. WED' bSDAY, MAY 30. 1900.  mby Cabòr ••Ts Organizing ««  W •> (i «1  % AN ARTICLE WRITThN EXCLU flj SIVELY FOR THE ITEM BY I JOHN L. SHANAHAN.  PART XXI. two dollars a clay. refl. ct upon the  will be in the near or far distant future. The workingman and work-^ ingwoiriHn, the merchant and the w'ftiechanic. will be comijelled to ptiind somewhere in the battle if they do not propose to hide. Then W build the iHurel wreath of victory ® I around your convictions.  ll^i To be continued,  «>1 - _____ _____  ^ ' QR. LONGSHORE'S NEW MUVE.  Tn response to an urgent call from  Siianiokin, in which place an ex-  , tensivfe patronage is located. Dr. A. number of men in society who hold Longshore has acted on the re-ten thousand dollnrs in money "«»d I quest in such a manner as to give stocks as capital, how many such ^oth Mt. (Jarmel and Shaniokin the people are there throughout the benefit of his professional experi-nation? It is said tliere are sevf^rai ^.„ce, Xext week the doctor will hundred millinaires in New York | ij¡g famjiy to Shamokiti and  city alone. If so then l.ow I'lany ^^ of th^  naustf there be who have ten thou- ¡j^ oftíce in the building for many sand^ dollars in capital not invested occupied by Thomas, the  as is a laboring man's hcdy? Tie- photographer. on Independence fleet also, that such uf tlie^e capita- street. In the meanwhile the pre-lists as produce nothing, and yet gent dental parlors will be conduct-constanly consume, mustbe support- ^^^ present lines of ex-  tj^ire compelled to furnish pix iictRb much labor product as ihey  ed out of the toil of the capitalized laborers. It is for this reason tlie latti, tim  are allowed to get back. Lubor is the only element that can support anything. Whoever does not work must be supported by those who do work. Does it not then inevitably lift itself to this, that a part nf society are forcibly compelled to support another part, while the latter part are absolved from rendering any equivalt^nt? To get at the roi t of the matter then this bottom question must be put—by what nuinner of machinery do these countless thousands of ten thousand dolbir non-producing capitalists come to acquire 'the means by which they make labor their slave? If they all get it by their own labor tlien their case'.8 relieved of at least »me-ha If of outrageous nature. Of couise even'iiithis case they would have no right to reap wliere they iiad not sown and gather where ti^ey iiad not strewn, but half tluii' ciinie would be forgiven if by any possil)le hooyi^r crook they would siiow iiow th;;^|;heir enslaving capital had been acquired by their own htbor. The machinery by which non-producer's are armed with the pcwer to devour the substance of hibor is discriminating legislation framed to suit certain blasphemous fictions known as the rights of pioperty. Among' these fictions and fort-most is land and mineral ownnrsiiip considered as an absolute property right. Such an artificial right in natural wealth being opposed to natural right, cannot possibly be sustained except by forcible monopoly of the soil backed by the coercive machinery of the government. But b^iiiie government sustain this monopoly by force, ihen rent and royalty are inevitable and both are the prime source of capital not ac. quired by labor. Following land monopoly comes monopoly of the means of labor, machinery, ex-cha^e, transportation and com-meWI/; in short all the prime sources of equal opportunity for tlie many are monopolized to the few. and so the great mountain of artificial ca plt-al formed into trusts and gr(>at corporations is heaped upon the shoulders of laoor to oppress and ci ush it. Under the pastoral system the notion of property in tlie soil began to spring. But property was common, not exclnsivii or oi li^rw was limited to tlif poi'tiun of land which the herds wi-i'e allowed lo u;-e. AfKM' the ngrifulI ura i system as i^-sta'^-lished liind Ix cann* a.pijiopri'i 1. J exclusively. ]->nt rliis was iu all ca.sAS (iTtCted by force or fraud, for v^lT^lieople knowiiigly disinherit themselves and dosciMidant. Wiieie the country is iitw the wealth of nature is common to all; when the couiitry gets old every farm is a ga^^^reserve; but that which jiro-every t iiing—labor—hecoines the woi'se oil' as civil1 ion a(i-vances. When I say th.it uudei' these circuinstances iherf is not a remote possibility of a reconciliation between laiior and capital I will be accused of silliness by non-pro-ducing ca[)italists. 1 ask the reader if it is nor as phi in as day li;:!it that capital liy its very deiiniiioii commits a direct assault and rohhei-y upon labor wherever it is exei'cised',' Can an assaulted, robbed and insulted party be expected to go hand in hand with the party that constar.tly falls upon It with murderous inteivt? I ask the reader to scan the position I have stated as shown by tea pita liz-ing labor and then coinpaiing its means of gain witli those of ordinary capitalists. If it carries conviction then face the conclusions. Thesi issues press more and more seriously fQira settlement, and settled they  cellence. Dr. Eugene Longshore, a brother, and lor tlie past two years a student at the Philadelphia Dental College, will liave charge of the local office but will be assisted- three days a week by the doctor who will retain the proprietorship. We are sorry to see the Doctor and his family leave this community, but we wish them every success.  MEMORIAL  SERVICES  A complete programme of the services for this morning was given in our last issue. Post 02, G. A. K., Garfield Camp 84, Sons of Veteratis, the Relief Corps and the Drum Corps meet at the Gran:l Army hall Ibis morning early enough to form into line and leave there about eight o'clock. The usual ceremonies will be conducted at the several cemeteries.  Tlie Spanisli Ann rican War Vctv rans liavy been given a ulace in line, and all members of that body are re-q'lesti-d to participate.  After the decoration at oui- local cemeteries committees will repair to Locust (jap and perform the ceie mony there. In the afternoon a squad of Sons of Veteriins will drive to Hear Gap, wliere a number of old veterans are interred.  Bakiog Powder  Made from pure cream of tartar.  Safeguards the food against alum»  Alum baking powders arc the greatest menaccrs to health of the present day.  _" royal baking powDEn eo., new york.  PERSONALS.  MEMURIAL SERMON.  Sunday morning the Grand  Seward on the Coal Trade.  Anthracite producers are keeping the tonnage well under control, says the Coal Trade Journal, prices are being held firm. Soft coal is going forwartl to all the lake ports, and the movement this year is expected to be much in pxcess of last season. In the East it is said tliat the contrnct^ business is not so brisk. Hopes of a break seems to be entertained not-withstar.diiig tlie strong features. The tidewater market seems to be about as well supplied as it ever was and tiiere is an easiness to tlie situation which is quiet noticeable. There is plenty of soft coal available and when transportation facilities are good, as they are tlie buyer waits for the seller. Coastwise freights are much easier, and so far Eastern  01 Is oMio f^l; i was a \ i.-it, r Slu'iui iitlii.i Ii,  Marry Wet/,ol. of Sunbiiry cal'ed on li i( nds hiM'e Sunday.  .Misr Sadie ^^organ call'"I on fiieiu!? at CJirardville Sunday. .\,i.y Joseph ^farsil and Robert Ander-of tint ReiinM'c, t'^e Sr«ns of \'eto. 1 son were visitors to ^forea Sunday, rans and the Womans' Relief Corps ^ Michael Garner, of Ashland, was attended divine service in the | ontei tained in Mt. Carmel over Sun-Primiiive Methodist "ihurch. AIT day. three organizations were very well represented. A powerful sermon.  Our Assortment of. . . Spring: and Summer  SINGLE BREASTED SACK SUITS  is perfectly beautiful. We have some specially swell styles from the tailor shops of iMlCHAELS, STERN & Co., Rochester's foremost fashion makers. These suits are made from every fabric that has strength and character and in every style that will please various tastes. Prices begin at  $6.50  for a strictly tirst class Cheviot or Cassimere suit in black, blue and fancy patterns and up to  $!6.00  for fine imported Worsteds and Serges. You should not buy your suit until you see wh;it we have to offer.  ONE CENT  Ike Goldschmidt, |  Clothier, Tai'of, ^ 25 íuiíl 27 N. Oak Street. |  full of patrioric sentiment and Christlike advice, was preached by the Rev. Samuel Cooper. The dis course was able and learned, and the i many lofty expressions oontained in it sank deep into the hearts of the listeneis.  REPUBLICAN ¡NATIONAL CONVENTION AT PHILADELPHIA, JUNE 10, igoo.  --1 at Peiroe (,'  Special Cheap Excursion Rates via Plnli:-, cliaile-i linliins. delphia tS: Rcadinii Railway. IVa., i-^ -¡KodiiiL;  'i'o accomodate visitors to the Ih -publican National (."onvouiIon, the Pliiladelphia & Heatling Railway has .irraiiued to sell oxoursion TicK-  ports there is quite a coal.  movement of  win. BASTKESS' FATHER DEAD.  Attorney John E. Rastress was in attendance on his sick father, Milton Bastress, at his home in Tin-h township, near Sn.vderrown, on Saturday when he breatlied liis last. He had only been abed for about a week witli an acute attac.di of Jiriglit's disease. Deceased was 68 years of age, a veteran of the Civil War. was a prosperous farmer and hiylily respected resident of that section. A widow, tliree sons and two daugliteis survive. The late ¡Virs. Lemuel Parry of to\vn was a daughter. 'I lie funeral was held yesterday morning.  ALUMNI BANQUET.  Thurstlay evening the Alumni Association of the Mt. Carmel Higli School met in annual session in Kiefer's hall. After an lionr"s amusement the graduate;- disposed of an (xcellent banquet. Dancing and other entertainment folbiwed until a late hour. The attendance this year was unusually large. I Beiore adjournment the Alumni elopted ofTicers for tlie ensuing year. Edgar Slioemaker was chosen president and 'I'hon-ias York secretary and trei.' "  ets from all Ticket Stations to PhiLi-, del|diia at the low rate of Siu>;le j P'are for the Uound Trip, with minimum of oO cents. Cliildren between T) and 12 \ ears of age hall' rale. These tickets will Ix! sold aiul ^omi going June loili to IDth inclusivi . and will he good for return umii June 'Jdth inclusive.  For full inl'ormation as to rale oi fare, time vif trains, etc., (Nonsuit Ticket Agents or address Edson ,1. Weeks, Gi-nerai Passenger A;^' ni, Reading TcM'minal, Philadelphia.  Maurice John, who is visiting heie from Pittsburg, sjxmu Sunday in Shenandoah.  Mrs. Elizabeth Slohiu' left Monday afternoon for iMunc.v where slie \^ ill visit frii'uds.  David Penman left Moiiday niorn-: ing for Phi!adel|)|)ia v. Ik re he ill I make his futur(> h oio , I Frani; Mepjer i'e nri''(! Monday i morning 10 his dumi - 01 Imm.U-.ei pi r  en-e, 1'  t I  Willi b i- p;. 1 .-Ml s o;i ' !'  Kmaniiel Smmi--.i M ig^in-. w I H' \ i ol Mr-. Sii :i y <,.  ( i. . 1 >. II - C MII'' I  • I . Ills o.i w -  ■ 1 'iCi I h h I ij '.V i ■I r \ I' i,,11, lla'li-. o!  ' ' I M 11 h t, \V , hi.\s here .\ V . 1 VI-.  I  H'- I.  , 11 ■  ( ^ 1 r,v ■ I  I \\ I M 1 II!  j w...  Pl.I- ..  sii<. i;  .s! reef. Mr^,  (';i\. I-  (' I  tin \ .  r. .V  • 11  N  ih,  till I i \ -• .\ vi 11 n .  ^ . nf Wr.-t 11 11 lU'M or, l'ìrin!  .5 ...... r. r  V I i I II  lo i 'r II. (Ill 1- il li  U.r.  or M ih ini.v ! 1 n;.: hilf .M I S. 1 sire, t  i I ' s  a. A. R. ENCAMP.VvENT:  I  Reduced Rates to Qettysburii, Pa , via Pennsylvania Railroad, Account O. A.  R. Encampment.  For the G. A. R. Encampment. Department of Pennsylvania, at Gettysburg, June 2-<J, the Pennsylvania Railroad Comi^any will sell excursion tickets to from all statifuis on its  a pM ne I )ia I 111 the I ! ■ I ¡1.1 11 sc >11 Mil s, w ns the ' 111 - Ilici''. ,¡in er- Sill i ! h on  V. Il 111 SUMd.lN-.  :'M,1 M s F, I K' l bs ;.n.l Mr--.  N l-in 111 (i! b;, ,10 III;: spi lit ill" ,-i-V. I ;l 1 ,1 1 \ s 11 t t !.t' hniniA 1 f ,11 i|i 11 un X-ir; h O IÌ; sti t et..  -I!' -.1  w. >1  M r (' W  p 1st  K' r-i'\  W 1 rri ti W i. h 1 ina 11. a lormer M t. CaMiii'i In,y hin now located in I'll ibid'dphi.i. r I m •' u|i o'l Sn 111 rd.'.y Gettysburg ¡ •-'vening lo ^|lel;^l a few days will) line in the |'i¡^ palents  State of I'emisylvania at fare for the round trip be sold and good going June 2 o and to return until June 11, inclusive (minimum rate fifty cents).  Board.  Cur boroin.ili Mr' ooi P.oai'd held an adjourned ."-ession ?vlonda.v evening to close the y( ai'"s business. All bills were ])aid, ineliKling the teai.'b-er's salaries a ml t he .veaiiy sjilarii s of the board otlicers, and evio'ythiim made ready for the new Directors, who will be swoi n in next Monday,  PEOPLE TURNEO AWAY.  Pawnee Hill's c oinbined shows, historical Wild West Hi. podroine, is without any exception the l;est we have seen for many years. It is a [ileasi ng a lid ridiin d cnterta i nnien i At the iilteriioou iierroiiiialuMM tln ir I vast canvass elichised p¡i i k w.-i:-! l)acked , a nd in tin' e vein im b iind 1 en. ^ I were uiiahb' to otUaiii d in i.-sioi:.— ' WashiiiKtoiu D. ('.; Post..  'f '"ic| (i.'orgi^ John and wife, of l'utib-'!'iek"fs ti' ' vi!!r-. came ui) on S;.inid.iy i-'Veniig and spent tin' Sibl'.'U)) wiili the former's parMifs Ari bur John ,ind wife, on South Vine si it el.  ^T'liiday moriiiiig Mercha t Louis Qrcissnian left foi' New York, there to take steamer for l'ìurojje lie will be gone three months in all, and while eiitour will visit the J^iris expiisi I ion.  f  ■p  IVIASS MEfcTiNG OF I'. M. W. ON :'.OTH.  On '.Ve(;ne"da\' Memorial Day, at 2 o'clock in ! he ,'iftenioon there will be a mass meeting of the XTnited Mine "NVork'-rs mi ihe town park. Speakers I'r 1 n di-'tu'ince who, will appear aro < Harris, lieynolds-  ville; T. J. I."unon. J ickson and Michael ]«', I'liili of Scianton. 'I'he l)ublic is invited to aMend the all'air.  FOGO FOR ÍHE HUNfiRY.  .'■Miiiilay morning Rev, Harris .'iiiiiounced ilnitih" amount ahead;, coliecleil in the ('oni-U'eiia ( iena I 'I'aliei'tiacle for the famine stricken of India had n aei.eti .-¡-11 .-'v'), ami i: i-rxjiected lliat tlie snin v. ill i iin o\ri ,$.".0.110. It was free will olTi ring, a nd t 111' inoiiex will he a ( incl sen 1 to tii(> starN'irg in-opie in tliai I';ii ii land.  Do "In a>Ua" Rítrííain?  We know have pr-gain. ' will ortb.  .v.'ii do. therefore we i 1 time, not one bar-1 nv'.s o," them, as you 1 iiciiig at our windows hi J stor.' A. Stief.  AT IRVIN'S,  Carpenters IMmiday niorning under (i. W. INlorse commeiicetl ilic work of remodeling Irvin's big ().iU street store, loweri ng tlie lino;- to ;i level wilh the pavement. Willi a new front |)lacetl and the store room eiilargi d -Mr. Trvin is going to have one of th(^ handsomest and nmst substantial store rooms in town.  . 11  V 1  I !i  !üü  Pr.in br.ck oí your eyesT-' Hea'.y pressare in your And aro  yen n:-'ti:;!i.'ii fa'nv a.ri ? is you; L.>:i;'.ue coaicd? 1 ;.d in your niouih? And du-á your l'.:oa t;; . tiobyoa? Ar^) Voa r '.T-,-IIU anJ irri'.anieP Do you o.t-.n b' the iil.i-o? And are you irnu'.;. i .TÍ-out í:!o;?pin .■;? The i'»' yciirKvcr ià sill wrong. Bullhereis a c;irc. -"ru—  i'H'.YCI E PAi^f ilF;, At Ml..' .Olir of t;oing lo press scores of bic.\ < 'r' ri'ier-- v em ing for the par;'de. A ' I'l  PAWNEE BILL'S SHOW, Despite the drenching rain ly.lKiO people ttled through the doors of the monster canvas enclosed jjark yesterday, to witness Ihe performance gather- given by Pawnee Bill's Wild West, account! which delighte 1 everybody.—IM o-.i-'     ¥                            1    m          ulti j    Vi    >     will an-■  enr ne', t is.'^ne.  treal Can., Herald.  I  They act directly on the liver. They cure constipation, biliousness, hsiuiache, nausea, and dyspop.si:! FortiOVears they iiavc been ;hc •■;;n;dard Family Pi'lls. iMce cer!i3. All Drusglr.ts. " I hri' P tMUf'ii yrr's I'ills rt'eularly for liix iiuiinlis. They h.ivi' I'lui'd iiio ill' a Kcviri; hinulaolic, ;nij 1 ciin now walk from . vM) ;a tour iiiiliis wi t limit ire rrilifr tirodur • ■.•■ if liri'iith, suniothinji 1 li.ivu iiuc bueu (■ ■ Jn f-.r ii>aiiy years."  y) K. WALWOTtK,  .1 V „.If . Salt-'Ui, JIass.  •r^-* . . ... n r~ »nm^ir» J"—II IIB ■! I  SHIRT WAISTS  A8:ain the delig:htful Shirt "Wais weather is here. Where is there a I dy who ciofs not wehome this season, wh. n shi: can wear the dainty, cool and becominp; w. ists. Han.dsoax .styles and ¡¿irg': .i-sorUr...'r't colors and v/i.i;e. An (.l i ,.nt 50,: wa^s% tucked 'r.Mit. in ."oi-ors. Cth V- a': -j]., 7:., ;!>1.00 and v--:,  v:  : . h i.: :  7 ■■ ■ z ;'i  to vvi'ar v/ith \ h : wa  i-ry  oood Skirt i 1 cotton cov(:rt, colors tan an.-i blu pl.iin or triinme'ti, At 50 ar.d 'i;f.''5  Special—tm C'\,sa skin-trimmed with white at 50c.  CARPETS  Thi stock on hand we offer at much lower fig^ures than they are worth today. All carpets bought later will cost us more and we'll have to ra'se the retail price accordingly. Take advantage of the stock on hand and get your carpet at low f gur. s.  Tiipesfrit's from 55 ccnts wu-ii up. \''i'J]'i'ts at 90c and $1. Axiiiinsfcrs from $1 up. Body Brussels from ¡15 up. Ingrain and Rafi' 25c yard up. All wool extra Ingrain a specialty.  Sew and tack carpets free of charge.  iWt. Carmel, enna.  ♦ ♦♦  RICHARD IRVÍN  NORTH OAK. STREET, MOUNT CARMEL, PENNA.  •Í.'«»' -"Tv .>v --»«»v  Lord's Noveity Store  RINK BUILDING.  UÜUuí..   

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