Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Mount Carmel Register (Newspaper) - August 6, 1856, Mount Carmel, Illinois                                 hi  â /amih¡ nlMìWt ïitrrntnre,localniib itmrallíDtelliSfníe, ^oiiliiß, ügritultiire,'iìiumiion, Snìinstri), Srnpronemnit. îr^rful Sifor'Än, Imîifîrmrnt, ÄarkiV, ^f, 1  _^________—■ ■ -^-i--r-i—--:-—- .. ^ ----... i  VOL. 15....NO 31.  MOUNT CARMEL, ILLINOIS, WEDNEpAY, AUGUST 1806,  WHOLE NO 76t  THE  late. Her  MOUNT CARMEL REGISTER  Office,  la PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNGBUAV,  BY T. 8. BOWERS.  Goforth'e Building  Main St.  UTTha subscript ion price of lliis paper $1,50 per annum, iC paid within sis months o •ubsuribing. If payment bo lunger delayed f2 will invuriatile bo cliargcd. ' inri'ul'Bcribera who do not give express "no-tico to the coiitrary, are considered as wishing to continue their subscriptions.  [CTNo paper discontinued until all arrear* ajrea aro settled, except at the option of the publisher.  A Pleasius Stoi y.  M}' Duel with Captain iß lliott.  'My duel with' Captain Elliott,' said the Doctor, lit;Uling a freiili cigar,'took place during tho war of Mexico. But before I procoed I must give you a short account of uiy previous history.' • '  'Elliot and 1 had been rivals and enomiea from our very boyhood. We were educated at the Bcmo public school. Before 1 arrived, he was the jpet, hero, and Nopoleoa, so to speak, of tho »ciiool; tho leader, aliko in study., in sport, and in mischief. He was a proud, imperious, over-bearing boy, though with many generoua and endearing qualities; audjoui of school, his will wo» law to the boys, os much aa that of the teacher WHS in school.  When 1 arrived, however, being about his own nge, or>d a lad of considerable spirit, I refused to submit to his authority; ond there being many mal-coiitwits in the school who secföfly disliked him, ííiey one by one on-rolled themselves under my standiird, and wo wore thus divtdsO into separate factions. Numberless wore the pitched battles which wo had, us well as the personal coiiflicts for 8iipremacy;numhorlesg wore the 'bloody and cracked crowns;*numberless tira reprimands und even moro tangible inflictions of teachers. Elliott and 1 wero, in fact, always at variance, always crossing each other, and agreeing in nothing cxccpt in iialing oach other cordially.  When we left school he went to West iPoint.and 1 to tho Medical College, and wo lost sight of eacli other for some years*, in due course of ticAe, I commonced {vacticiog as a physician; but finding it did not pay very w ell, and being besides of a eooiewhot roving and odventurous disposition, I applied for on<j obtained the appointment of iirm; surgeon, and was immediately ordsr-  ed to Fort G-.  1 had been there but o short time, when the commnndnnt brave old Gurley, whom some of you doubtless remember, died of lever. An ofilcer of the name of Elliott was appointed to succ%<d him, and you may judge of my mortification when 1 found it wos my old enemy. Much os it gnllod my pride, i was obliged here to submit to his autboritj. but I did it 1 assare you with a •bod groco.  Elliot hnd essontiiilly clmnged since I had last known him; tho impetuous, ovorbearing )boy 1)11(1 became n grave, quiet, reserved •man, who could, if ho chose, render him->eirH very ügíeeublo conipimion, but who seldom touk thotrojble to do it. Many of the officers, howpver, and all the men; liked him, but somehow there seemed to be au ■impassoble borrier, fi.x8d betwooa him ond •me. I disliked his reserve, which I attributed to pride; and h« complained of my bois-terouuness, as he waspleosod to call it. He did. indeed, make some eßbrta to conciliate «le at first, but aeoing I repulsed thom, ho withdrew himself behind his entrenchments, find treated me over «fter with a coiduoss abiO uteiy freezing. Things wero in this stote when an uncle of his wiih wife and daughter, stopped for a «hört limo, in the vicinity of the Fort, on their way to Washington. Tho daughter, Miss Eveline, wos a charming young lady, and tivery unmarried man in the garrison immediately fell in love with hor. it would weary you to numerate the pic nics, the 'water-parties, the drivesand halls that wero given in honor of her. A good natured rivalry prevailed amoug'us for preference, and tho bets were taken as to whether David or; Jones, or tho Doctor, or the comamn-dant himsoli^ hod the best chance.  For myself, 1 was, 1 do think, seriously in lovo with the charming girl. To be sure «ho did not givo much encouragement, but 1 tried to encourage myself. 1 rode with her, (lanced with her, walked with her, and kept with her as much as I possibly could.  1 saw that Elliot scowled darker than ever upon me, but 1 did net care for that; in fact  2 was glad of an opportunity of giving him pain, and showing him that his dislike for mo was not shared by his connections.  On the evening of her intei ded departure, there had been a farewell ball. 1 hod don' ' ced with her the whole evening, while Elli> utt, who did not dance at all that night, sal moodily conversing with his father. I was NO fascinated with her, and so grieved at the thought of her leaving, that before 1 slept that night, I resolved to see her io the mor> ning, and make her a lender of my heart.  Accordingly as early as decency permitted, 1 called, and was. by the blundering servant, shown at once into her presence, where an extraordinary scone presented itself. On a sofa in the room, her face buried in the cushions, hor dress disordered, her boautiful hair, which curled oaturaily, oil io a tangle, and her attitude deDOting the very prosiratioD of dispoir, lay the charming girJ 1 had parted from last night io theexu. berance of youthful and light-hearted joy.  On a table beside hor, and on the floor, were scatterrd ioDumerablo iettera, and a portrait, a IccJcet, a blue ribbon, and a withered rose lay carelessly among them. She rose on my entrance, and would have  .(denied herself, but it was too '»yes were bloodshot wi'.b weeping, and her fair cheeks swollen and disordered. 1 look her band with much solicitude, and inquired the cause of her sorrow. A fresh burst of grief wos her only answer, and it wos some time before she wos sufficiently composed to give 010 an explanation.  It appears that she had been for.a long time engaged to her cousin Elliott; and that he hod in a fit of jealousy, returned her letters and tokens, and formally broken the engagement.  •It was my fault,' said she sobbing, all my fault. 1 did wrong to play with bis noble nature.'  •His noble nature,' said I bitterly, for, as you may suppose, I did not feel in the blandest of humours at tho discovery i had made.  'O, Dr. C-said she, 'you do not  know him. He is the best, the noblest of men; and 1 have lost hirn, lost him by my own man folly.'  Here she full into a passion of weeping again, so that I forgot my own disappoint-mcut in my solicitude for her. 1 suggested perhaps an explanation might be made.  'Impossible!' said she. 'It was my ffirt-ing with you, and iMr. Jones, and Mr. David that offended him—and how could that be explained? I am sure that it was not itiat I cared a cent fur any of jou, (fancy my feelings,) but 1 am naturally fond of admiration. I have tried to cure myself of it,  but cannot. O, Mr. C-, my heort is  broken. Here—read this note.'  'Defend yourself!' he exclai<  She gave me a piece of paper, crumpled with her burning hand, and wel with tours, on which I read aa follows:  'Madame:—In returning to you tho letters and tokens which 1 have had the honor to receive from you, I wish you to uiidor-stand that the engagernent between us is broken ofl", now and forever. You aro now at liberty to flirt with whnm you please. 1 cannot share a heart with twenty others.'  •Jual like him,' said I, with bitierness, OS 1 finished this laconic and sontenlatious epistle, but she checked me with such spirit  that 1 was fain to hold my ofiered, for her sake, to go to Elliott, and endeavor to explain the matter.  'Alas,' said she,' you cannot; he wont off t/iis morning before daylight on a three months furlough, leaving that cruel note and tiie packet of letters to be delivernd to rne'on awaking. He has gono, 1 presume, to New Hampshiro, where his friends reside.'  Here we were interrupted by the en-trn'oce of Miss Eveline's roother; and I took my leave, quite cured of my love fit, and very thank/ul that I hod not subjected myself to the pain of a refusal.  But I am spinning out my atory entirely loo long.  When Elliott returned from his furlough, he treated me with even greater coldness than before—In fact we never spoke to each other at all, except when duty compelled us to do so. This made it so disagreeable to me, that I was on the point of applying for an exchange, when the .war with Mexico broke out,, we were ordered on active service, and private animosities were forgotten in our zeol against the common enemy.  Elliott had been left in charge of a large numbar of sick and wounded, while tho rust  his sword, med.  •Captain Elliot,' said I, «although 1 am not conscious of having injured you, I am ready to give you the satisfaction you demand. But had we not better return tu the camp, obtain seconds, and conduct the affair in the regular manner?'  •No,' said he, •! will not wait. I will hold no'further parley with you. Defend yourself!'  Thus adjured, I drew my sword, but had ecarcoly done so when something whizzed past me, a sharp report was heard, and with a wild cry Elliott fell at my feet. 1 looked for an instant behind me, and saw tho dark countenances of half-a-dozen -Mexicans, as they prepared to reload their piece?, anc then fled into the chapperel, "tarrying no longer to question.'' On—on, I sped, this wny and that way, through the tangled thicket, tripping my feet on long trailing vines, scraping my hands on thorns uatil completely worn out, 1 climbed up a lofty tree and hid myself among its loafy branches. Here I renioined for several hours, and heard my pursuers crashing amongst the underwood, shouting, swearing calling to each other but gradually tho soui/ds died awny, the chase seemed to be given up, as I was left alone in that wild, unbroken soli tude.  The afternoon was far advanced when, driven partly by hunger, partly by tho droad of passing tho night in the chapparel, I ventured to descend from my loafy covort, where the musquitos had made a feast of me, ond tho monkeys had chattered nl me with their strange, mocking gestures. By the aid of my pocket compass, I found ihy way buck to the clearing whence I had so suddenly departed. After carefully recbn-noitering to see that none of my Mcxican friends were lingering near—(to this day I suspect that womon of having sent them after us)—1 advanced to the spot where poor Elliott hnd fallen. *  He was lying on his face in a pool of blood, his hands clutched the grass, hio hair  conch, he remained taciturn jind reserved as ever, and never made ony ^^^on to the subject of the quarrel. 1 felt ^i^fe piqued dt his'silence, for I could nof^J^ thinkingahat my having'soved hifi^fi'dnran ignomiaÈjMtdeath. dendrved a few BcknowlOTgement. More than o^oej^e seemed on the point of broaching thei^il^bt —but ha appeared waiting for me tp(B$gin it, and I >aited for him! H  At last he #ai9 so fai- recovered that my professional services wore no longer required. ^s I arose to take my lost leove, 1 signified as much to him, and added : '  •Ambitaunderstand, Captoin Elliot^tlmt we retuin tò the same footing that wo wore on befor«!»' #  'The  he exclaim^, with a sudden earnestness that surprised mo.  'Bacause if }ou wi'ih to finish the quarrel so inopportunely interrupted, you will find me ready at any time.'  'Do you wish to renew that unhappy quorrel?' asked he, on expression of tho deepest disappointmoot overspreading his fine countenance.  'Who? 1? Most certainly not,'said I,'but you demanded satififflclion, Captain EHioll, and, sir, until" that demand is withdrawn 1 must, of e.ouree, hold myself in readiness to grant it.'  •1 withdraw it now,' said he, spanking vory quick. 'I ask your panion for my rnsh and injurious words. If that will not satisfy you, 1 will bare my bosom to your sword, but I will never,' said ho with emotion, 'raise my band against the noble, the magnanimous preserver of my life!' Thoao were his vory words. After a pause he  added, 'Dr. C-, we have all our lives  misunderstood each other—believo me, hud I known your worth soocer, I would have aclcnowledged it. Wo have been enemies long enough, let us now bo friends. Will you try to overlook what is past? Will you bo my friend?'  •My dear Captain Elliott,' cried 1, iieeply touched by the generous speech, 'I am your friend. Since 1 carried you in my arms into that lonely glade in the chapparel, I have become so much attached to you that I would as soon shoot my own brother as lift n finger against you.'  I held out my hand to him, but he threw himself on my breast and burst into tears, for his nerves were apparently weak with his recent illness.  There was no more coldness after that, no more distant reserve—all was open ond above-bofrd between us thenceforth; and I am proud tossy that the more highly did we esteem oach other.  I had the happiness of reconciling him to his fai| cousin, to whom ho was still attached, (notwithstanding the little episode of tho senorim,) and  When wild war's deadly blast was blown, And gentle peace returning, I 'assisted,' as the French say, at their wedding, which took place at New Orleans. The very next day ofter this interesting event I was taken sick with yellow fever; and Elliott and his new-made wife spent their honeymoon at my bedside—the truest, and mo0t faithful ond devoted friends that ever a man had in the world !  ./^nd that, said the Doctor, (throwing the end of his cigar in the fire,) was the upshot, of my duel with Captain Elliott  peace. I then and uniform dabbled in blood*, and his fine  manly form (he was one of the finest look ing follows in the army) pierced with three or four ghastly wounds. "Ah ! poor fellow I poor fellow!" said I, as 1 stood and gazed upon him; for though I wa^ a mortal enemy I could not help feeling sorry that so bravo a soldier should thus perish like a dog. shot down by an unsoon foe. "But, thank God!" 1 ejaculated, with a thrill of indescribable pleasure, «'thank God! I did not kill himl" I hod turnod him over on his back, ano as I thus »rood moralizing, I thought I per ceived his bosom heave. I placed my hanc upon his heart, and found that he still lived As I knelt by him uncertain what to do, he opened his half-glazed oyes, and I saw his parched lips try to form the word "water. My first impulse wos to run to tho brook which flowed at a short distance; my next to stop short and consider. Should 1 restore to life the man who, a few minutes before hod been thirsting* h>r my blood? No, would leave him to his fate, which his own rashness ha€ provoked. I turned my back upon him; but suddenly, as if traced with a finger of firo, there was borne upon mine the words of Holy Writ: "If thine enemy hunger, give him food; if he thirst, give him  of tho nrmy pressed on .towards the Halls cf IAnd fast upon them came the  other divine sentence: '-Insomuch 08 ye did it not unto these, ye did it not unto Me." I seized his cop and ran to the brook for  tho Montezumas. 1, o( course, wi^s there with several ottondants. We were encamped in 0 picturesque little hamlet, situ  ted in a wild, romantic noigbboriiood, and water, with which I moistened his parched ' ' ' lips and bathed his gory temples. Taking  my case of instruments from my pocket, 1 then proceeded to probe his wounds. The Mexicans, I forgot to mention, had rifled him of his watch and other valuables, but on teoring open his shirt I found a small locket suspended from tiis neck by a hair chain, which had escaped their search. 1 opened it. It contained his mother's por trait. (Ho was her only son and she was a widow.)  "Thank God!" I agoin ejaculated; "fhat mother's curse will not light on me."  Whot to do with my patient after having dressed his wounds, was what puzzled mo. To remove him myself, was impossible; to leavo hirn in the burning rays of the sun, after having partially restoreg him to life, seemed cruel, however, there was no altel--nativo. Before leaving him, 1 half carried, half dragged him into the shade of a treo about n hundred yards distant, h would be impossible to de.scribo my sensations, when I found myself with my deadly enemy in my arms—two hearts so lately boiling over with malice and revenge, and all the darkest passions cf our nature, now throbbing peace fully against oach other; his, poor follow, with a motion so faint as to be scarcely perceptible.  Well, I hurried to the oncampmont for assistance, and soon had him 'conveyed thither in safety. For many weeks, he lay hovering between life and death; for the pain of his wounds, which were vory severe the loss of blood, and the exposure tu the suu brought on brain fever, and nothing but the most unremitting care ond attention saved his life. He bore hia sufferings with that noble endurance which is true heroism, and which let me tell you, Js a much rarer article than mere courage in the field. In fact he displayed during his sickness so many admirable qualities that it was a mys-  tho country being pretty quiot, we wore in the hobit of venturing some distance from ihe encampment, shooting, sketching, or perhaps flirting; for you know our follows did not extend to the Mexican senitoras the hostile feeling with-which they regarded the men. For myself, I cannot soy that 1 admired them much. Some of (hem were pretty, to be sure, but ihat abominable habit of smoking cigariois, spoiled them in my eyes. •! liked a good cigar myself,' said the Doctor, re-lighting the ono 'which hod' gone out, 'but 1 don't like to see a woman smoking. I couldn't fancy Venus herself with a cigar in her mouth.  Well, one morning I sauntered forth, portfolio in hand, tor the purpose of taking some sketches; and in the course of my wanderings, came upon a pretty little dwelling by tho side of a woter-fallyin a sweet sequestered spot; on a mossy bench by the door sat a young girl of wonderful beauty, with a guitar io her hand, the 8^«oot melody of which blended delightfully with the soft murmuring dash of the water-fall, ond tho gurgling of the stream beyond it. it was a picture of surpassing beauty and loveliness, and I immediately sat down on a fallen tree to commit it to paper.  While thu.s employed, a man wasobserv ed approaching, whom I soon found out was no other than Elliott himself. As ho near-ed the cottage, the young girl, who had evidently been expecting him, threw down her guitar and ron eagerly to meet him. He sot down beside her on tho bench, when sud. denly observing me, he started as if a serpent hod slung him. and hastily approached me. He glared upon me with a look in which all ihe hatred that hod been gathering for so many years seemed condensed.  'This is the second time, sir,' said he, fiercely,'that you have crossed my path—it shall be the last time! Follow me if you dare.'  'If by crossing your path,' said I, 'you mean an allusion to ihat young woman, I assure you I have not spoken to her nor approached nearer to her than I am now.'  •Must I call you a coward?' aaid he, 'will you follow me or not?  I threw down my drawing materials and followed him. He entered the chapperel, and led the way to a clear space near a runningbrook.  Outrages in SCaatiEUi.  A third cothpany of free Stat« enrigranis, seventeen in number, have been plundered and sent back down the river. Goods such na the robbers do not want for iminediata use, ore placed in the stores bf Aínjors ds Russell, at Leavenworth, who aré Ih« agents of the Southera or alayery pocietf for subduing Kansas.  The most atrocious outrages yet com» milted is in a teller dated from|Topek8, July 8. While a man named Richards, from Ohio, living in the southern portion of ,th9 territory on Pottawattamie crrok, was ab. sent at Westport, spme men came to his house ond asked to see him, but weút aWy  One Comes no More.  'There is no floek, however watch'd and tended  But one dead lamb is there ! There is no fireside, howsoe'r defended, But has one vacant chair!'  Three summers ago, as we passed to and from our dwelling, we used to notice two golden haired children at play in the yard or upon the sidewalk. They were pictures of health and beauty, ever-gushing fountains of childish buoyancy and mirth, and os bright os the sunshine which played around them. Each had a cordial greeting for us as we posssed, and each morn and evo wo looked for thsir bounding furma as we turned the corner. Not long since, in company with a friend, we turnod ihe same corner, and a lovely girl came to meet him, and turned up the cheek for the accustomed kiss. "The other little feet do not como to moot me any more!" said he with a quiver-ng lip. There was a shadow deeply lying in his heart. The tripping steps of the sister awoke the echoes of the lillle brother's steps down where they linger, 'mid the desolation of broken hopes. Tho other little steps moot him no more! There i& a vacant chair by the hearth, and the winter flakes all coldly upon the littio mound among the sleepers. Life has no sunshine which dispels these shadows, which linger through ife like a pall over buried treasures.  The little foet are tripping lo the music of angels.—Cayuga Chief.  Tale-Bearing.  Never repeat a story, unless you are certain it is correct, and even not then unless something is lo be gained, either of in-torest to yourself, or for the good of fhe person conccrned. Tattling i« a mean and wicked practice, and he who'indulges in it, grows more fond of it in proportion as he i« successful. If you have no good lo say of your neighbor, never opproncli hi? character by (elHog that which is false. He who tolls you the foult.s of others, intends to tell  Virginia aa it Was and as it  . Gov. Wise made a speech^ the O'til 00 the'occasion of incugUtj^lng. a rotatuie of Washington.at (hpMflitary Idali-tute of Virginia. It was, in some respedtft, a speech of «nusuol merit. ,;The Old Do-minion was lauded as she always is by those who claims to represent her, aiid the refineJ, and aristocratic society which greVv up within her elicited ncf small degree of ihe speaker's admiration. Commenting Upon this portion of Gov. Wise's speech, the N.Y. Herald obsbrves, in its characteristic way: "It was, indeed, a grand old society, that of Virginia.in the olden time, which Governor Wise so loves to celebrate; with grand  old choroctera stalking through it,. af]i^,be>,^£i;pmisiDg to como ag^iia whe iiittliBg their desSSft^iMlilii by-tha" c^irastfTTurned. AbOtt Ifen o'lUfe^'^i and grand manners, upon who.«e decay it is painful to reflect; and a grand patriarchal simplicity in the mode of living and the style of thought. Virginia was, indeed, in thoso days a breeder of heroes. Such a breed of men as Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Henry Clay, Randolph, and their compeers has hardly lived oi any lime or in any other country—men of large minds, with enough theory and enough chivalry to embrace what appeared good in matter of novelties, and yet enough discretion and caution to avoid being beyond the domain of practical realities; brave souls who never knew what it was lo skulk, or to misrepresent, or to conccl, ond who were as forward to admit error as to vindicate truth; iron men, who left their stamp on the char-acierof American institutions lull as deeply—though their -influence wos so shortlived—as that of her generation of remarka. bio men who inherit republican liberty  ter the family hod retired, a knock'was heard at the door. Mrs. Richards'asked what was .wanted. The reply was, 'wo wont to see Mr. Richards.' She replied Ihat he was not at home. They then demanded Mrs. Richards to open the door.—  "He's a G— d-d Abolitionist; we must  have him.' She again replied, he is not at home, and refused to open the door. It was then broken open, and seven or eight men entered the room ond commenced searching it for Rlchardii. Not finding him, they accused Mrs. Richards and her daughter, on intelligent young lody about 19 years old, of secreting him. The ladies completely bewildered with terror, protested that Ihey had not secreted him—that he was really gone to VVesport. Ono of them then re» plied. 'Then, G—d —n you, we want you,' ond dragged ihe daughter from the bed, and from the house into the bushen close by, and there proceeded deliberately to  from their fathers and bequeath it to us.— i violate her person. Her mother, Mrs.  Well may Governor Wise love to dwell on iheir memory; for ains! in the S-ate, whoso  Richards, was treated in the same monner, and both left for dead. How long they  chief magistrate he is, and for who«ie honor i remained in the bushes they were unable and glory ho i.« so solicitous, there is no Iraco | to toU, but they managed finolly lo reach of any su(*h now. ) the house, whero Ihey were found by one of  Virginia broods no more heroes. The ; the neighbors noxt morning. It has sinc3 race of great men whojsecured lo her the | been ascertained that the scoundrels wore control of ihe federal governmonl for so ' o pari of Buford's men, who ore armed with many years over the heads of the Franklins j U. S. muskets, and in the pay of the U, S. and the Jays and the Adamses of hor sister { marshal. Attemp s lo bring them 'o jus-states, is now wholly extinct. Whoiever | lice through the territorial authorities had has done it—whether the long possession of'oltogether failed, and the husband hod come  power has enfeebled them, or the decline of agriculture in tho State has led loa decline in the character of the ogriculturalists—it is now quite certain (hot Virginia excells in nothing but her small poliliciiv^Qs and her negroes. On these points of excellence, Mr. Wise touched happily in his last speech, showing their re/nnrkoble connection with each other, as exemplified in the raise in the market value of niggers which will follow Mr. Buchanan's elevation lo the Presidency; and no doubt it is a matter on which the Governor is a competent and well-informed witness. He knows the nigger market, and is undoubtedly welt qualified to say what will inflate or what depress it. Weoaunot, unfortunately, share his emotions, os Ihe commodity is not dealt in Hereabout»; and therefore perhaps we are unable to participate in the glee—wo had almost said the exultation—with which he unconsciously admits that the State of which be is so proud—Virginia—which was formerly famous OS a breeder of heroes, is now chiefly known to the world as a breeder of negroes  lo Topeka to endeavor to raise a company to ferret them out and punish them.  , , ,j , . , : others of your faults, and so the dish of  vvir?^''''" I news is handed from one to another, until charncter so completely. Whether utvos ,be l we becomes enormous. 'A story never 1  ow.nglo ,h.s.or to myh«v,ngdone him o anything,' is wisely remarked; but  service 1 cannot tell; but insensibly the } i  hatred all melted from my heart and in its stead sprang up a strong feeling of regard. Curious, wasn't it T  But whether his feeling wna reciprocated ur not, I knew not; for although his entire manner was peculiarly soft and gentle, and  the l \ie becomes enormous, looses anything,' is wisely on the contrary gains in proportion as it is repeated by those who hove not a very strict regard for truth. Truly, 'the tongne is an unruly evil, full of deadly poison.'  OirThe Pekin Plaindeaier says the Illi- _  , ■ J .. ' - --------—! nois river is OS Rear dried up as it gonoralv :  Here he luined and drew his eyes would light when I opproachcd ihe g^ig lo b* ot this season of tho year. ' '  Tho Dying Mozart..  Wolfgang Mozirt, the great Germon composer, died ai Vienna in the year 1791. There is somethihing beautiful and touching in the circumstances of his death. His sweetest song was the last he sung—the Requiem. He had been employed upon i.'iis exquisite piece for several weeks, his soul filled with inspirations of richest melody, and olreody claiming kindred with im-morlolily. After giving it its last touch, and bretihing into it that undying spirit of song which was to consecrate it through all time, as his 'cygnean strain,' he fell into a gentle and quiet slumber. At length the light footoieps of his daughter Emilie aivoko him. 'Come hither,' said he 'my Emilie my task is done—the Requiom—my Requiem is finished.' 'Say not so, dear father,' said the gentle girl, interrupting him, as tears ■«tood in her eyes. 'You must be better—you look bolter, for even now your choek has a glow upon it—1 am sure we will nurse yo i up again—let me bring you something refreshing.' 'Do not deceive yourself, my lovo, said tho dying father, 'this wasted form con never be restored by human aid. From heaven's mercy olone Ho I look for aid in ihis my dying hour.— You spoke of refreshment, my Emilie—take these my last notes—sit down lo my piano here sing with them ihe hymn of your sainted mother—let mo onco mora hoar those tones which have been so long my solace-mentand delight,' Emilia obeyed, and with ft voico enriched with tondurest emotion, sung the following st(\nza>: Ppirit! thy labors are o'er' I'hy term of probation is r>in. Thy steps are now bouiid for tho untrodden shoro,  And tho race of immortals begun. Spirit! look not on theftrifc. Or the pica.inres of earth with rogrot— Pause not on the thresbholdt uf liniitluss life. To mourn for the day that is sol. Spirit! no fettirs can biiiil. No wicked have power lo molnst; There the wuary like thee—Hie wjutched 8h.ill find A (leaven, a Mansion of rest. Spirit! how bright i;« the road For which thou art now on the wing. Thy home it will be wiih thy Snvior and God, Their lotiil bttllelujih losing.  As she concluded, she dwelt for a momnni upon the low, melancholy notes of the piece, ond then turning from the instrument, looked in silence for tho approving smile of her father. It was the still pnssinnlesa smile which ihe rapt and joyouH spirit loft—with the seal of d»^ath upon «lioso feaiurci.  A Bright Example.  Many years ago, in an obscuro country school in Massachusetts, an humble, consci* entious bny was lo be seen; and it was evident to all that his mind was beginning to act and thirst for some intellectual good.— He was alive to knowledge. Next we sea him put forth on foot lo settle in a remote Iowa in that State, and pursue bis fortunes there as a shoemaker, his tools being carefully sent on before him. In a short limo he is in business in the post of Qouniy sur*. veyor for Litshfield county, being the most accomplished mathematician in that section of the Slate. Before he is twenty-five years of age, wo find him supplying the astronomical matter of an almanac in New York. Next he is admitted to the bar, a self fitted lawyer. Now he is on the bench of the Supreme Court. Next he becomes >> mem-f ber of the Continental Congress. Then he ! is a member of the committee of six to frame the Declaration of Independence.— He continued a member of Congress for nearly twenty years, and was acknowledged to be one of the most useful men and wisest counsellors in tho land. At length having discharged every oiBce with perfect ability, and honored in his sphere, he died regretted and loved by Slate and nation. This man was Roger Sherman. We take particular satisfaction now and then, io chronicling the career of these self-made mes and holding them up as bright examples for th» youth of our time to follow. It is the best service a journalist can perform for the good of the rising generation. *  OCrWhen a cucumber is taken from th® vine, says the Maine Cttllivator, lot it bo cut with a knife, leaving about the eighth of an inch, of the cucumber on tho stem, then slit the stem with a knife from its end lo the vine, leaving a small portion of tho cucumber on each division,aod on each sepe-rate slit will be a new cucumber as large as the first. Those wishing to raiso largo quantities of this article for pickles, will do well lo try the experiment.  Oir A Methodist and a Quaker having stopped at a public house, agreed to sleep in tho same bed. The Methc^ist knelt down, prayed fervently, and confessed a long catalogue of sins. After he arose, the Quaker observed, 'Really, friend, if thou art as bad* as thou sayest thou art I think 1 dare not sleep with thee.'  0:!r"Two wealthy ladies. Misses Anna and Elizabeth Sherwood, Sheffield, England, have just been liberated by the inlerventioa of Iheir friends, after fourteen years* imprisonment for contempt of the court of chancery. They continued in prison fourteen years rather than produce an unimportant document in their possession.  OirA sporting young lady says, 'if tho course of true love never does run smooth, why don't they water it. and roll it regularly so many times a day, until they get the r.our8e ho smooth that any donkey could run upon it?' Thai young lady is'some.'  ipiT'Hurrnh for Fillmore!' said an old fashioned Whig. 'Hurrah for the Devi«* said lit» sour oflice-holder, to wKon» the exclamation was addressed. »Very retorted the Whig, 'you >«H-rah for candidate, and I'll hurr>vh for mino.'  Orirlf honest omni nre ihe salt of theearfiV pretty girls may be said ;o be tho sugaii.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication