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Edwardsville Intelligencer Newspaper Archive: January 28, 1938 - Page 1

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Publication: Edwardsville Intelligencer

Location: Edwardsville, Illinois

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   Edwardsville Intelligencer, The (Newspaper) - January 28, 1938, Edwardsville, Illinois                            AH of tht County, S Nation pub- It the d Speedily n d Accurately. Madison ome Daily THE WEATHER: H Mostly elondy, rising temperature tomorrow. Temperature today at 8 P. M, 40. 75th 23 EDWABDSVILLE, ILLINOIS, FEIDAY, JANUAEY 28, 1938. EIGHT PAGES TWO SUPPORTERS SILL BUSINESS Chairman S. E. C. William 0. Doufllas, Eccles, Chairman of Federal Reserve Favor Program. Queen Ailing Again PLAN DISCUSSION AT "BUSINESS" CONFERENCE This Financing Major Part of New Deals Second Recovery Program; Does Not Include Heavy Spending. Niagara Falls Bridge In Grip of Ice Jam Washington, Jan. least two high administration officials were known today to be supporters ot a plan that would allow the government to finance nmnll business loans. Chairman William O. Douglas, ot the Securities and Exchange Com- mission, and Chairman Mnrrlner S. ficcles of the Federal Reserve Board, believe that such n plan will meet the complaints of smnll business men who have complained that banks are reluctant to provide credit for expan- sion. ThU problem will be discussed at next Wednesday's meeting of "Little Business with commerce department Officials. It also appeared that financing of "Little Business" is a major part of the new deal's second recovery pro- gram now taking shape. Unlike the first ptogcam, which flattened out against the business ic- CCssion that became manifest last fell, the new recoveiy plan, uccoicling to present Indications, docs not Involve the heavy expenditure of public funds, but rather Is designed to sllmuUite private spending. The highlights of the administra- tion's business aid program aie: 1. Creation of permanent facilities tor financing smnll business. 2. Revision ot the undisti United corpoiate profits find the capital gains and losse- tnses, which business clainu aie burdensome and bar lie M to ro- Covoiy. 3 Cication of S. housing nuthor- A third operation on Queen Alex- andrine, above, of Denmark, caus- ed alarm over her health. Attend- ing physicians at a Copenhagen hos- pital are said to consider the condi- tion of their 58-year-old patient dan- gerous. Assert Anyone Failing to Obey Sentry Can be Shot; Consuls Make Representations to Jap Consul General. DEMAND FOR CODE BOOK NOW EFFECTIVE Apology Offered Allison, Cour- teous Gesture Not Implying Sentry Acted Improperly, No Apology to Briton. FIRE ALARM Wilfred "Babe" Schwartzkopf is Injured in Fall While Turning in Alarm. Ity to facilitate slum clearance, and llbeiuliiatlon of the loan policies of the federal housing aclmitmtiation to stimulate construction. Those appealed to be (lie immecl- lata objectives of the new iccuvery drive. But new clealeis behove that other steps me necessary to attain a permanent, comp.iiativcly stable form Of recoveiy. Among the suggestions advanced by vaiious administration Officialb in iccc-nt weeks were legisla- tion for strict control over monopolies and elimination of certain foims of holding companies, notably (hose In the utility and banking llcltls. Both tax rev ision nncl the new hous- ing proj-'iani nie now in the IrgUln- ttvu mill. The small business financ- ing plan Is in the formative stage. WOMAN ASKS FELL INTO POST HOLE Mis. OHIe L. Leisuie filed suit In the riicuit court here Friday against the City ot Granite City, Southwest- Bell Telephone Company ami the Illinois-Iowa Light Power Com pany. She asks damages foi Injuries allegedly suffered on June 13, 1937 through n fall Into n hole on Twentieth Street. The holu had been left unguarded tor tluee months, Mrs Leisure charged. The city was made a defendant be- cause of control over public property The hole, according to the complaint, was three feet deep and six Inches In diameter. Mis. Leisure claims her leCt leg was injuir-cl and that she also Internal injuries. ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MAN KILLED ON ROAD The popping of cans and jars ot veg- etables, fiuits and other grocery stock making a noise resembling a Fouith of July celebration, sounded an alarm Friday morning at o'- clock for a fire at the store of H. C. Duslmatm, 300 North Main street, this city, resulting in a loss of approxi- mately Fire Chief Dennis Hentz said he believed the fire had burned for only a few minutes before the heat became sufficient to cause the bursting of the cans. A ventilator in tho roof let air escape, probably saving the front win- dows from blowing out, the lire chief said. Wilfied "Babe" Schwartxkopf, h nursing two badly skinned hands as a result of his activities In helping ex- tinguish the the. After being awak- ened he hurriedly dressed and then started to run to the office of Western Illinois Oil Company to call the lire department. lie slipped on some snow and fell headlong on some cind- ers, skinning his hands. He lives at the rear of the store. When firemen arrived a large, hole had but nod near the center of tho store. Firemen weie unable to find auv thing nearby which might have started the flames. A dense cloud of smoke was rolling tiom the ventila- tor. The flames were extinguished with- out much trouble with one line of hose. Chief Hentz stated that loss to the building would piobably amount to a similar amount being esti- mated us the loss to stock, Besides loss of stock the store fixtures were damaged. An additional damage was done at the Casscns furnace agency next door. The building is owned by Mr. Cassons. Officer John Huse matie an inspec- tion at the' store at o'clock, con- tinued his rounds and then went to the police station. He anrl Officer Kllsworth Monk were the first to be attracted by the bursting of cans half a block away and noCillccI the (Ire- men. About the same time B. II Weber and mcmbcis of the Sell kopf family were awakened and turn- ed In alarms. Fhemen answered a call to the home of Mrs. Julius Schiebe, 419 Plum street late Thursday afternoon. An overheated gas heater caused the blaze. No damage was clone. Shanghai, Jan. A Japanese ar- my spokesman said today that the sentry who slapped the face of United Stales Consul John M. Allison at Nan- king was "only doing his duty." The spokesman added "Anyone who fails to obey orders of sentries can be shot." As the spokesman made his state- ment the United States and British consuls general here made separate representations to the Japanese con- sul general, asserting that their gov- ernments were unable to recognize the right of Japanese to censor commer- cial messages. The Japanese embassy had announc- ed that effective today Japanese cen- sors would demand copies of code books of all commercial firms, regard- less of nationality, and a consular cer- tification that messages were bona fide This was necessary to prevent leakage of military importance, the embassy said. the incident in which Allison and another -now disclosed to be Charles Riggs, of Sco- tia, N. Y., attached to Nanking Xfnl- versity were slapped, the army spokesman said that an apology of- fered Allison was merely a courteous gesture and did not imply thot the sentry had acted improperly. No mention was made of an apology to Pressure of the worst ice jam in history, which swelled by 20 feet In 24 hours, made a total loss of the graceful Falls View Bridge across the narrow gorge below Niagara Falls. The bridge is pictured above spanning a river of ice. As the jam grew, ice enveloped the lower levels of the steel work, and carried the arch slowly down stream. PROPOSALS CALLED Route U. S. 40 Sector in Bond County First Near Here to Be Relocated. There were some discrepancies In the reports given by representatives oC Allison and by a gendarme and policeman who saw the incident, the Japanese spokesman said. He com- mented that Japanese did not doubt the version given hy the gendarme and the policeman. He said that the sentry slapped Al- lison and Riggs in the face when they tried to enter the courtyard of a building occupied by Japanese troops. They sought to investigate an alleged assault on two Chinese men and a Chinese woman, the spokesman said. According to the spokesman, the sentry spent half an hour explaining to Allison and Riggs that they would not be permitted to enter the court- yard. Then, he asserted, Allison and Riggs sought to "slip in" and the sen- try slapped them. MILK PRODUCERS ASK HIGHER PRICES An administration wns begun Thurs- day in the probate court here1 upon the estate of Charles Clifford Harris, Woiclen, fatally injured on the night of December 10 when struck by un automobile diiven by Fort Llpc, of Hillsboro. The petition states that the only assets aie a claim for the death of Mr. Harris. His wife died some years ago while the family lived here. There aie nine children, six of whom are minors. Mr. Harris wns walking along Route 86 near the Worden Wye when struck by the car. A tinctured skull caused death. He had spent the day helping his brother, Fred Harris, who was buying cattle. Present Chicago, Jan. -The federal gov- ernment presented Its case today to a grand jury which will be asked to Indict John Henry Scadlund, alias Peter Anders, for the klclnap-slaying of Charles S. Ross, Chicago Valentine manufacturer. ANTON LOVERINA TO BE BURIED SATURDAY Funeral services will be conducted Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Straube Funeral Home for Anton Loveiina, World war veteran and WPA worker who fell dead Thursday morning on Ranclle Street while at work. The body will remain at the funeral home until the funeral serv- ices. William Snadjr, officer of a Chechoslovakian society, will have charge. Mr. Loverlna was a member of Ed- wardsville Post No. 199, American Legion. He will be buried with mili- tary honors at Woodlawn Cemetery. Deputy Coroner B. II. Weber con- ducted the Inquest Friday morning, the jury returned a verdict that death wns duo to natural causes. Mr. Lo- verina had been under care of a doctor for three months, taking treatment for heart disease. Mrs. Rosalia Loverlna, aged mother of Mr. Loverina who is an Invalid, will be to attend to attend the funeral. St. Louis, Jan. producers supplying dailies in the St. Louis area testified at an agricultural department hearing on a proposed new milk mar- keting code at the Chase Hotel yester- day they should receive a higher mini- mum prico iiom dairies because of in- creased costs of production since en- actment of the 1936 health ordinance, which now governs the supply of milk. Purposes of the hearing are estab- lishment of minimum prices dairies may pay produceis, revision of the order now in effect and extension of its provisions to some SI. Louis su- buibs which were removed from the order by amendments. Between 50 and 100 farmer-pro- ducers attended the opening session yesterday. Evidence was presented by produceis ycsteiclay that produc- tion costs have risen from 35 to 70 cents per 100 pounds since the present order went into effect. The hearing probably will continue through today and tomorrow. It Is being conducted by four representa- tives of the agricultural department, with E. O. Mather of the solicitor's office presiding. The others arc Paul Miller, principal agricultural econo- mist for the dairy section of the AAA; Robert Hanson, marketing specialist for the dairy section, and Howard Fed- dcrsen of the consumers' division Announcement has been made by the Illinois division of highways that bids will be received at Springfield on February 8 for a bridge and grading section in connection with reconstruc- tion of U. S. 40 in Bond County. The announcement states that grading ov- er a distance of five miles 'in which cubic yards of dirt will be moved will be required of the con- tractor. Two large bridges are also necessary. Plans are being made to complete the heavy grading work early this year, making it possible to ask for the paving jobs to be started next fall and probably completed during 1939. Completion of the road will depend upon progiess made in obtaining all of the land rights. In Madison County it is planned to relocate the road to the north of Highland and St. Jacob and along the southern limits ot Troy. At the East St. Louis office of the division Friday it was stated that bids on the Madi- son County bridge section will be tnk- en as soon as county authorities report that 90 per cent of the land rights have been obtained. County Superintendent Highways Harry Kluge said Friday that appiox- imatcly 90 per cent of the new road- way has been deeded or optioned. He said that all but two of the necessary tracts have been secured. It is be- lieved a settlement will be reached in one, but a condemnation suit may be necessary in the other. The right of way committee has concentrated on the blrdge section, members doing some vvotk on tracts to the west. A representative of Division Engi ner Wilson's office said Friday that n fund of has been set aside for the construction of two bridges anc heavy grading at Troy. U. S. 40 is patt of a federal highway and Con- gress provided funds for the work. FLASHES Leased Wire Bulletins on Latest World News Today. Snow In Ft. Myers, Fla. Ft. Myers, Fla., Jan. melted from tropical foliage along Ft. Myers streets today after the first snowstorm in the city's history. The snowflakes drifted down on avenues lined with palms, hibuscus and or- leanders for a brief period, melting as they touched the ground. Bandits Get Glasses. Cleveland, Jan. bandit who entered a chain store last night took time to be fitted with a pair of black Oxfords before robbing Joseph Strunk, manager, of ?8. Two Confess Robberies. East St. Louis, 111., Jan. Morgan, chief special agent for th Illinois Central Railroad, announcec today two men had confessed robbing the Seminole Limited of thousands o dollars In mail In three recent raid on mail cars. The men were Juliu Boust, 45, sentenced in 1930 to flvi years in federal prison for violation o Dyer Act and Joseph Bcrzius, 19, botl of East St. Louis. Agree On Tentative Flan. Geneva, Jan. tentative plan to aid China against Japan and to seel- United Stales cooperation was agreei on tonight by British, B'rcnch am Russian delegates to the meeting o the council of the League of Nations Defer Drafting Resolution. Washington, Jan. Unite: Mine Workers of America today unan imously deferred until their 1940 con ventlon iesolutions to draft Presi dent Roosevelt for a third term. Cruisers Muy Remain. Manila, Jan. 28 Three Unite Stales cruisers which are at Sydney e route to Singapore to attend the open ing ot the great British base, ma remain in that vicinity indefinitely reliable source indicated here today. BRAINS OF THE OUTFIT Dunn, N. C., Jan. H Westbrook, Harnett County farm- er, convicted of "driving a mule while under influence of today was given a 30-day suspend- ed sentence by Judge Duncan Wil- son. State Patrolman J. F. Bradshaw testified in recorder's court that the mule was "just leading him along the road" in a wagon. "In fact, the mule was ths brains of the Bradshaw told the court. iiancola Executed First; Only Woman to Be Electrocuted in Illinois. Menard, 111., Jan. Marie Porter, 37, widowed mother of four .laughters, was executed in the elec- .dc chair at the Southern Illinois Penitentiary today for the murder of ier brother. Her youthful lover, An- gclo Giancola, 22, the actual killer, preceded her. She was the first woman ever elec- rocuted in Illinois and only once be- fore has a murderess paid with life, [n 1S45 a woman as hanged at Law- rencevills for killing her husband. Mis. Porter, sullen, pudgy-faced showed no concern. She played pin- ochle with matrons until she was moved to a death cell at 9 p. m. last night. She walked steadily to the chair, unassisted by the guards at her side, She repeated a buef prayer, read bj a Roman Catholic priest, then stepped before the chair, facing more than 100 witnesses, all men. she said, "I wish to thank the warden, the guards and lovely matrons who have stayed with me. hold no malice toward anyone. May God have mercy on my soul." She was executed without further ado. Giancola had died without a preliminary speech. He had carriec a cross. The executions took place immediately after midnight. Mrs. Porter, Giancola and hi, younger brother, John, 20, were con vlcled at Belleville, 111., for the insur- ance-murder of her brother, William Kappen, July 3, on the eve of his mar riage to Miss Irene Traub. John, minor participant In the plot, is serv Ing 99 years in prison. The Giancola bt others were to hav received ot the Mrs. For ler hoped to obtain from insurance on Kappen's life. The policies namei her as beneficiary. She feared he would change the policies after mar rlage and so had him shot to death All the principals were residents o St. Louis. She wore a black silk dress for the electric chair. It was similar to a jumper and designed so that her leg could be bared for the electrodes. TWELVE ARE GRANTED BENCH PAROLES HERE Twelve defendants in crimina cases in the circuit court here wer granted bench paroles Friday by Judg D. H. Mudge upon recommendation of State's Attorney Lester Geers. defendants were first offenders. Eight Granite City youths held o burglary and charges were amon those given paroles for one year They are: Stanley Walk, Jr., Ome Horton, Robert Perigo, Sidne Vaughn, Lynn Edwards, Martin The beau, Edward Homola and Cliffor Horton. Three young men from North Ven ice were given paroles on charges o malicious mischief. They were Ernes Tooley, Noble Hall and Kennet Oliver. Glen Robert Zimmermann Highland, held on charges of larcen of a motor vehicle also was paroled 'wisted Steel Skeleton Lies in Gorge, 100-Foot Ice Jam Sent It Crashing. Niagara Falls, N. Y., Jan. wisted, steel skeleton lay in the Nia- ara gorge that remained f historic Falls View Bridge, known s "Honeymoon Bridge" to brida ouples throughout the world. The towering span, which for 40 ears had linked the United States and Canada about feet below the Niagara river's twin falls, collapsed efore the forces of an ice jam as man ought to save it. A wall of ice almost 100 feet high ent it crashing 160 feet into the gorge a few minutes after emergency crews vhich had worked nearly 36 hours t elieve the pressure against it, climb d to the safety of the river bank. With a deafening roar that drown d out the perpetual sounds of th American and Canadian falls, the 840 oot arch crumbled into a mass of ton girders which had formed its spider veb foundation. As It fell, it chipped off small pieces of ice and sent then lying into the air so that, for a moment, they resembled falling snow The bridge, called Falls View be cause honeymooners and other visit could see both the American and Canadian falls fiom it, wa. braced yesterday with huge timbers nit they furnished only temporary protection. More girders snapped, an> engineers for the International Rail ,vay Company, bridge owners, an nounced that the damage was beyon repair. The workmen, who had been in dan ;er of slipping from the Ice into th ;orge, climbed to the banks. Minute ater, the span broke away cleanl from the approaches on the America: and Canadian sides, and tumbled be ow. With the removal of its greatest ob stacle, the ice starting moving slowl down the gorge, carrying pieces o the steel wreckage. Engineers believed that the moun- tainous ice would tear the wreckage Into smnll pieces as it is moved down the river in the ice jam, but should the mass of steel remain intact it might leave sharp ends projecting to damage river side property between here and Lake Ontario into which the river flows. There also was a possi- bility that it might aid in forming a serious ice jam down stream, menac- ing the two bridges below the one that went out, but, for the moment, this danger was said to be remote. lalls for an Long-Time Naval Building Program in His Message to Congress. ASKS LEGISLATION AGAINST PROFITEERING Seven-Point Program Provides Anti-Aircraft Additions and Appropriation for Increasing Army. 30 INVESTIGATORS TO PROBE TRI-CITIES RELIEF Washington, Jan. Arthur Vandenburg, R., Mich., today called upon President Roosevelt to 'the justifying facts If any' for "the biggest regular budget for arms in our listory." Washington, Jan. 28 President Roosevelt today warned Congress that America's national defense is inade- quate for national security and called for an long-time naval juilding program, immediate start on construction of two additional dread- naughts, and two new naval cruisers. He asked additions of more than to the present billion dol- lar defense expenditure called for in the 1939 fiscal year. Mr. R.oosevelt viesv of war alarms spreading through the world Congress turn its immediate attention to enactment of legislation designed to eliminate profiteering in any future war and to equalize bur- dens of any possible war so far as possible. Mr. Roosevelt's 7-point defense pro- gram provided: 1. Authorization of army anti-aircraft additions, with to be spent in the next fiscal year. 2. to be appropriated for increasing the army enlisted reserve in the next fiscal year. 3. Authorization for for army dies and material equipment of which S5.000.000 would be spent in fiscal 1939. 4. Spending of S2.000.000 to increase army munitions reserves. 5. Authorization for a flat 20 per cent increase in naval program estimated by congressional leaders to involve an untimate total cost of 6. Authorization and appropriation for start oE work in fiscal 1939 on two additional capital ships and two ad- ditional cruisers. Mr. Roosevelt did not estimate the 1939 cost of thU program but said it would be "very small." 7. Authorization and appropriation of for experimental naval vessels in the 1939 fiscal year The new defense program would add to the nation's 1939 military and naval costs, plus what- ever might be spent in launching the proposed new dreadnaughU and cruisers. "Tension throughout the world is declared Mr. Roosevelt, in hia message to Congress. "Armies are fighting in the Far East and in Eur- ope; thousands of civilians are being driven from their homes and bombed from the air. "As commander-in-chief of the army and navy of the United States it is my constitutional duty to report to the Congiess that our national defense is, in the light of the increasing arma- ments of other nations, inadequate for purposes of national security and re- quires increase for that reason." The president's message called for somewhat less in additional arms ex- penditures than had been anticipated, although the long-term cost of the program as submitted by him was estimated at more than a billion dol- lars. Granite City, Jan. 30 in- vestigators of the Illinois Emergency Relief Commission will arrive in Gran- ite City on February 1 for the purpose of making a thorough survey of the families on relief in Granite City, Venice and Nameokl townships and eliminating all those no longer entitled to assistance, It was announc- ed yesterday. The work will be under the super- vision of J. J. Derkits, Edwardsville, county certification officer. No Statement of Bunk Affairs. Springfield, Jan. State Bank Examiner Frank Adams said to- day he would not be able to make any statement on the affairs of the Belleville Bank and Trust Co, closed yesterday, until he had completed an examination and audit of the bank's accounts. He satd that he did not expect the audit to be completed until the last of next week, that until the audit was completed he would be unable to state what an alleged short- age totaled and whether the could be reopened. bank TO CONDEMN LAND FOR VENICE VIADUCT Venice, Jan. J. E. Lee, mayor of Venice, announced yesterday that condemnation proceedings to ac- quire a strip of land for an esatern approach to the viaduct carrying Mad- ison avenue over the railroad at Broadway will be started if negotia- tions for sale of the land are not com- pleted by Feb. 4. The land sought is occupied by a one-story warehouse owned by A. K. Nicol and the building juts out to point which enforces traffic off viaduct. It Is proposed to widen driveway to 61 feet. Report Not "Substantiated." Berlin, Jan. official DNB agency announced today that report! that the Reichstag would meet Sunday had not been "substantiated." reports %vere that the Reichstag would meet In connection with the sary ot Fuehrer Adolf Hltler'i slon to office In 1933. __.,   

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