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Decatur Herald Despatch Newspaper Archive: January 22, 1898 - Page 1

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Publication: Decatur Herald Despatch

Location: Decatur, Illinois

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   The Herald Despatch (Newspaper) - January 22, 1898, Decatur, Illinois                        stock ies in our street store TH moved Main street: basement we are now it down o ng-, reduc- ioublv re- trebly re- so that >ne who can :an have a ['shoes. We lis because not want t this stock our new CEMI-WEEKLV PER YEAR. PER YEAR c EMI-WEEKLY d SI.OO PhR YEAR. Disagree About a Question of Veracity. BAILEY FUMES IN VAIN I-'or Everything Goes Wrong, and Nothing Goes Bight with Epi- sode on the Has a Corrobor- ative Pro-Cuban Speeches by Little TariS Mixture is Thrown In-Approprialion Bill is Passed. Washington, January Heed, from the rostrum of the house Bliley, kuder of the democrats, from his place on the floor, glared at each other at the close of the Cuban debate today and joined an -sue of veracity. This sensational episode completely overshadowed the intrest in the Cuban debate which has continued uninter- ruptedly in the house for three days during the consideration of the Diplomatic and Consuhr appropriation The debate that effect with the speaker of the hr.use. 'The chair states that the gentleman 'rom Texas is retorted the speaker from the chair in most emphatic tones. The speaker looked the Texan straight m the eye and his voice quivered with emo- tion. "The chair never agreed that that motion, whilch is plainly out of order, would be entertained. The gentleman noti- fied me that there would be no further op- position." And I make the declared Bailey, "that we did have such an He too was evidently labor- ing under great stress of feeling. By this ti-ae the bouse was in an uproar. Bailey proceeded to explain the circumstances un- der which the alleged agreement was made. He said that some members on his side de- sired to attend the funeral of a distinguished ex-member (Batterworth) yesterday after- noon, but thf y desired to remain if there were to be any votes. He had approached the speaker, he said, with a proposition for a vote on the motion to recommit. The chair had assented, he declared, and he had so informed hi! colleagues. "The chair again states that no agree- mentw as said the speaker, looking down on the turbulent member, "and if corroboration; is [needed he has just been informed by gentiement who were present." The confusion at this point was very great but the voice of Smith republican of Miohi- Overrides Every Otl er Consid- eration Now IN THE SILVER SENATE Vest'3 Speech Seeks to Justify the Senate's Action Because the Administration is Committed to the Gold Standard and Sil ver Senators Protest-The Routine Busi- ness of the Senate-Morgan's Speech to an Audience of Sis Senators at the Close. n todas was opened by Clark democrat of Missouri, who made a breezy speech de- -irmg it to be the duty of this country, if Snaic doesCnot bring the Cuban war to a shortly, to expel her from the western hpmisphme. He declarer! that democrats :n.J populists wera rtady to give votes fur a vigorous foreign policy, and if only republicans would join them before sunset the Rlad tidings would ring a ound tho world that Cuba free by an ,u t of the American congress. At the conclusion of Clark's jemarks Hitt jioklcd to Orgen, representative of Wis- consin, who called attention to the embezzle- ment of money by Francis Wis- (onsin, who died iome years ago in Pans, by the vice consul of the United States at that capital and to the fact that there was no law by which the heirs of the deceased may or eould recover ira the bond of the consul. Williams, democrat of Mississippi, mem- ber of the foreign affairs committee, fol- >wed. He sneered nt the statement of Hitt gan, could be heard shouting uboiethe tumult that he had been present and no agreement had been made. Bailey thereupon appealed from the de- cision of the chair, and Dauziel moied to lay the appeal on tho table. Tue roll was called amid much lines were unbrokei confusion, but party and by a vote of 1GS lOWW. -Uf to the effect that granting bellig- er'ancy rights to Cubans would afford them no advantage. Williams was followed by King, democrat of Utah, who recently re- turned from a visit to Cuba. He described the harrowing conditions there and charac- terized tbe scheme of autonomy as a de'u- sijn, and declared that if peace came on that basis Spain would saddle the war debt on Cuba. There would be resistance and once more the fires of revolution would be kindled. Permanent peace could not come to the island until independence is achieved N Kin" affirmed that those in Havana who were openly committed to autonomy were secretly helping to drag it down. In Hava- na automrr-y is derided and scorned on every side. Johnson, republican of Indiana in a nf- te3n minute speech sustained the ,'ourse of the ad-uinistration. Simpson, populist of Kansas, said the in- a-tionof the government was due to the fact that holders of Spanish Cuban bom s were not yet guaranteed payment After soma brief pro-Cuban speeches by Robinson, democrat of Indiana, and Coch- lan democrat of Missouri, Dingley, repub- lican of Maine took the floor to reply to the remarks made during the course of the de- bate relative to wage reductions in the cot- ton industry. After such a revulsion of busi- ness as the country had experienced during three years, it was natural, he said, that recuperation should bestow. In all but one h imnrnvp- to 1H the appeal was laid on the ruble. Thi bill then passed 153 to 95. Adjourned. Day Repot t. Washington. January 20-After some mi- noi business the house went into committee of the whole on the Diplomatic and Consu- lar appropriation bill. Clark, democrat of Missouri irtde breezy speech declaring that it was the duty of this country if Spain does not bring the Cuban war to a speedy close to expel her from the western hemisphere. He arraigned the administrative policy as "feeble, cringing and cowardly." He wanted no- tice served on all kings, emperors and po- tentates that the navies of wans-Atiantic powers shiill not be used collection bu- reaus for lueetionable debts, as had recent- ly been done at Oorinto and Hay.ti. He de- clared that democrats and populists were ready to give 120 votes for a vigorous for- eign policy, and, if only twenty-seven re- publicans would join them, before sunset the glad tidings would ring around the world that Cuba was free by an act of American congress. Then ensued a spirited colloquy between Williams, democrat of Miisissippi and Ding democrat of Utah, on one side and Dalzell republican of Pennsylvania on the other aa to the relative standing of Ameri can revolutionists in the war with England and Cubans in the present struggle. Johnson, republican of Indiana defended the adminisfairtion and suid congress was not warranted in involving the country in war. 3impso'- populist of Kansas, said the inaction of the government was due to the fact that holders of Spanish Cuban bonds had not yet been guaranteed payment. Robinson, democrat of Indiana and Cochrane, democrat of Missouri, made prj- Ouban spseches. Industry (the cotton improve- .nctusiry imo ment had been noted and wages had been advanced. Alongside tho 10 per cent reduc- tion'in wages in the cotton industry had come" an increase greater than that in the worsted industry. He admitted, he sa d, that the depression la the cotton industry was unfortunate but the case exception- al It was due to tbe sudden and unexpected decline in the price of cotton and the com- petition that had grown up in the south. The Cuban question was temporarily lost of and for more than an hourthe jar.ff was'talked to tbe exclusion of everything else Dingley said that those who were still battering about lack uf revenues under h Inew tariff law, had better be prompt about it, for their opportunity to chatter would soon be over. He said: our receipts from customs were will soon silence ODURENOY HEARINGS CLOSED. Washington, January 20-The house com mittee on banking and currency devoted the afternoon discussion to the of the Waller bill. Secretary Gage appeared again for examination but instead turned questioner and put Chairman Walker through a long series of interrogatories. At the conclusion of his questions Gage said the bill lacked expcrtness and suggested that the bankers do not want to assume am- biguous responsibility. Walker asserted the responsibility was absolute and proceeded to explain why. Representative Hartman of Montana, one of the silver] leaders said Towno and Warner will make no further effort to be heard before the committee, preferring to go before the people with the understanding Lthat tho opposition was de- nied a hearing. The hearing on the curren- bills closed this afternoon and the com- mittee will meet again next Wednesday to decide which of the .four bills before it is to form thebasis currency measure to be finally reported. These are known as the momen- tary commission, Gage, Walker and Fowler The receipts tbeinsUvi these critics." At 4 o'clock the committee rose under U the arrangement made yesterday and ported the bill to the house. One of the most dramatic and sensational scenes of congress followed. The speaker of the house and Bailey of Tews, tho aemocratic ioade.. clashed on a question nnd tto excitement was intense. Tho Tesan "uoved to re-commUltho bill with instruc- tions to tho committee to report it back Tith an-amendinent embodying the terms f the senate Cuban belligerency resolution. Pitt immediately made the point of order that the amendment was not getmaine and v.'as obnoxious to the rule against new legis- 'ution. Thin tne speaker promptly "stained. Bailey, surrounded by a group u'fdemocrate. protested that the agreemsnl nade yesterday included a provision fora on the motion to re-commit. Hitt de- med this, swing uhnt notice of the motion to re-commit was given afterward. There much confusion while Hitt was tak- and when he had concluded Bailey UectriBed the house with the statement ttat e had bad a distinct understating Jo bills._____________________ DAWES' NEW ORDER. Washington, January 20-Oomptroller of the Currency Dawes has issued a circular to all national banks and bank examiners thnt hereafter national bank examiners shall not be alloved to accept employment from na- tional banks in making extra preparations for the private of such banks. In com- menting on the circular Dawes mid so far as he anew there had never been an in- stance of abuse 9f the privilege on the part of emminers, but he believed it was wrong in principle and therefore not good admin- istration. Be could readily understand that a bunk examiner who bed ,ecaived a Urge fee from this work might bo sorely tempted at times tt. make his report to the comptrol- ler as favorable as possible without actually mis-stating facts. All things considered, Dawes thought tbe interests of the govern- awes _ ment as well as good banking required that the custom be immediately discontinued. FAIR AND COLDER. Washington, January 20-Weather indica- tions for Illinois are: Generally fair.proba- bly colder Friday night j westerly winds Washington, January 20-By the decisive vote of 41 to 2, the senate today decided to proceed at once to .the consideration of the resolution introduced a few days ago by Teller providing for .the payment of bonds of tbe Cnited States in silver at the option of the government. Vest of Missouri, the member of the finance committee who had charge of che resolution spoke briefly upon it, but dis- claimed any desire at this time to thresh over the old straw of financial discussion. He said that twenty years had passed since the Stanley Matthew resolution was first put on the statute books, but he .'believed that there was now a reason why there should be a reiteration of the resolution and of 1he declarations contained in them. The senator maintained that the issue involving the consideration of the resolution ti r ist upon the senate by the administra- tion and that'senators were required either to remain silent and by their silence give tacit assent to the recent declarations of the secretary of the treasury in favor of the gold standard, those dec'arations being evidently endorsed by the president, or else to re-affirm the Stanley Matthews resolution which had been passed by the senate by a large majority and by the house by an over- whelming majority twenty years ago. "It will be said Vest, "that the pres- ent president of the United States was then a member of the house and voted for these resolutions." Vest held that the time had now arrived when the country must either go to tbe gold "tandard or make a last and overwhelming contest for a financial system which he believed the great majority of the people were ia favor of. Vest announced his intention to secure a final vote upon the resolution as as ore could be reached and accentuated his intention by forcing the displacement of the census bill with the Teller resolution as unfinished business. The day after 2 o'clock, was spent in ele- ctive session. Tbe following is the vote in detail by which the motion of Veto to take up the Teller resolution was carried: Bacon, Bate. Berry, Butler, Cannjo, Chit- ton, Clark, Clay, Cockrel, Faulkner, Har- ris HeiMeld, Jones, (Arkansas) Kenney, Kyle, MeEnery, Mallory, Mantle, Martin, Mills, Mitchell, Money, Morgan, Perkins, Pettigrew. Pettus, Pntchard Quay, Haw- lins, Roach. Shoup, Stewart, Teller, Till- man. Walthall, Warren, White, Allison. Baker, Cu'lom, Davis. Fairbanks, Foraker, Frye, Gallin- ger, Gear, Hale, Hanna, Hansbrough, Hoar, Lodge. McBride, Morrill, Nelson Platt, I Connecticut, I Proctor, Sewcll. Spooner, Thurston, Washington, January following resolutions were passed: By Mills of Texas directing the secretary of war to make an examination of the Port Artlur ship canal with a view to its extension to deep water By Pettigrew of South Dakota, directing the secretary of the interior and attorney general to inform the senate what steps were taken concerning the killing of a woman in Oklahoma by Seminole Indians, and the burning of two Semmoles in the same ter- ritory. Inquiring of the postmaster general what action was necessary to maintain the ex- cellence of the free.postal delivery service. Allen of Nebraska, introduced a resolu- tion directing the secretary of the interior to furnish the explicit charges laid against Mrs. M. E. Roberts, recently dismissed from the pensior bureau. The discusson developed the fact that Mrs. Roberts was discharged on allegations affecting her character. Allen said be did not know Mrs. Roberts! but it was infamous to dis- miss a woman on such 'charges without a hearing. The matter went over without ac- tion. Vest moved to take up the Teller resolu- tion looking to the payment of United States bonds in silver. Lodge moved to go into executive session, but the motion was defeated, 2T to 39. all the silver men voting silidly no. as did several western republicans and Quay of Pennsylvania. The Teller resolution was then taken up by a vote of 41 to and after some discussion was made unfinished business. Then the senate went into executive session. Morgan concluded bis four days' speech to the senate today on the Hawaiian treaty. He spake for almost four hours and when he were not more than half a dozen senators present. Teller will speak when the treaty is next taken up. Tbe senate will tomorrow consider the nomination of Attorney General McKenna to be associate justice of the supreme court. tbe distribution of seeds by the gotern- rtent. The petitioners favor the use of the money now paid for free seeds to defray the expense of an eihibit of the products of com at the Paris exposition. In their petition the Marshall county farmers that, as this country produces an annual corn crop exceeding bushels, while the demands for domestic consump- tion will abaoib only about bushels, and as this surplus is sufficient to reduce the price of the whole crop to a figure which, at best, but barely pays the cost of production, therefore they think that the pressing need of western agricul- ture is an enlarged market for American corn. They give it as their opinion that a creditable showing of American corn and .its products at the Paris exposition _would give such a market They.propoae the holding of a great oorn exposition In Chicago in 1899 as a pre- liminary step to the gathering of proper materuH for the French exposition and ask that confess discontinue the distribution of and set aside of that for the purpose of holding the corn exposition. Now Seems the Great Thing in France. THE NATION OF ZEALOTS Goes Crazy Over Jewish Persecutions As It Grows IWild Over Everything Else-Jew Baiting is No Longer Confined tot Paris But Extends to Other Batch of Foreign News from' All Russia's Gold Standard WHITE FOR OHAIBMAN. Washington, Jan. 20-The democratic congreaional committee tonight elected ea chairman Senator White of California. Tbe election of a secretary, which had been ex- pected, was postponed to await action by the organization conunitee of seven which will be eppointed by the new chairman. The attracted a good deal of atten- tion in the house owing to its beating on the speafership contest. White was sup- ported hy the friends of Representative Bailey are favorable to that gentle- man's ci ndidacy in case the next house is democn lie. As to the secretaryship, it is generall conceded that Lawrence Gardner, the pres nt incumbent will retire. The most D- minent candidate before the or- of the committee was James Kerr, former :lerk of the house The njeeting adopted a resolution affiirnj- ing its afiherence to the Chicago platform. The election of Senator White is regarded as a distinct triumph by the silver men. JOBS NAILED. Washiigton, January 20-0on5rmations: Postmasters-Illinois: Louis A. Constan- tino, Aurora; Htrry B. Ward, Duquoiu; Thomas'G. Lawler, Rockford; Smith D. Atkins, keeport; J. T. Ohenault, Benton; W. P. Dickie, Bunker Hill, COAL OPERATORS. CMcago, January 20-At the opening of the conference of bituminous coal operators and mineis this morning the scata commit- tee aske itb the results of j the gold standard, call- ing attention to the most striking fact that, while at the end of 1896, only 000 roubles in gold coin were in circula- tion, at the end of 1897, there were 000 in circulation, while the gold in the treasury Zrose during tbe same period by roubles. Russia now has 131 per cent more gold than paper- Japs Will Send Ships. Yokohama, January fleet of' nine war fhips will leave in the course of a week for Chinese waters. Decrees have been is- sued appointing Lieutenant General Vis- count Kawakami chief of staff and creating a supreme military advisory council. Will It Be Land Or Money. Berlin, Jan. German Missionary Homoyer, of Namjung station, who wne recently robbed and wounded near Lang- then, has returned to Namjung. He is now out of danger. Chinese authorities have taken measures to protest against the mis- sionary's state and have promised satisfac- tion. Will Be An Open Port. Shanghai, Jnnuiry is stated in offi- cial quarters here that Geimany will make Kio Obau an open port, without exclusive privileges to Germans and broadly on the lines {adopted at Hong Kong, the land be- ing held under crown leases. Followed John McColkmgh. London, January Katherine For- ythe, actress, late of Philadelphia is dead] She was the late John McOullough's leml- ng lady. Bubonic Plague Ravages. Bombay, Jan. 20--In the last week deaths from bubonic plague numbered 851. The espa.u3 is increasing and business is stagnated, Gladstone Still Drivw, Oannoe, January neuralgia, contlnuea be went driving thii- afternoon. Bugologist Dead. Halle, Jan. TaBohenberv, en- tomologist, is dead. FITZ ADVISES OORBETT. Minneapolis, Jan. to Cor- belt's wire to the Times here, I authorize you to go and intervUw that iakolng lain alarm. On my behalf ask him il hadn't better distribute some of the among some of the eminent physicians and try and relieve himself from the attack of paresis he has labored under ever since I- put him out of the business in Carson City. As he appears to be overburdened with money at present, I suggest to him the ad- visability of settling up the balances he owes tho physicians who treated him at Hot Springs at the time he crawled out of the match with me. Before concluding your interview advise him to blow out the pipe and stop smok- ing, as it has a wonderful tendency to pro- duce imaginary wealth, and is very irrita- ting to paresis, so lam told." BobFitzsim- HONORS AWAIT MR. DOLE. Chicago, Jan. Dole of Hawaii will receive a warm welcome when he arrives in Chicago next, Saturday morn- ing. Ho will be greeted with civic and mil- itary honors. Mayor Harrison, with a committee of citizens, will meet him as he steps from his train at the Northwestern depot. Maj-Gen. Brooke, with the Fort Sheridan soldiers, will beat tho depot, too, and will escort the distinguished guest to his hotel. Gen. Brooke is waiting orders from Washington before notifying the Fourth in- fantry and the two troops of cavalry sta- tioned at Fort Sheridan to be in readiness to participate in President Dole's welcome. A formal reception will be given in his honor, but the details have not aa yet been, arranged. COTTON STRIKE QUIET. Boston, Jan. sum total of new features in today's progiamuie of the tex- tile troubles was the shutting down of the Cabot mill at Brunswick. Maine, because of the desertion of the help in sympathy wilh striking weavers, and lie announce ment that the small milll of the Socia" Manufacturing Company at Woonsocket. B I would shut down lor a few days for lack of orders. Along the line of battle from Xew Bedford, Mass.. to LewiMon, Me there is absolute quiet. BULLET IS HIS HEAD. Maryvillo, Missouri, January 2C-Kmcry Walker, aged Mi. who ret ides near I'arimrd, in Nodaway county, is living with a in his brain. On- December 28 last young Walker accidentally shot himself. The ball entered his ranged upward and lodged in his head. The doctors taid his wound was fatal, but he has recovered. He is suffer. ing no pain as a result of tbe tecident but the fact that he has lost both the senses of taste and smell is conclusive proof to doctors that the ball is still in big btaii.   

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