Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Decatur Evening Herald (Newspaper) - August 18, 1928, Decatur, Illinois                                ING WHY WORRY 1 ABOUT ALEC! WELL, HE'D WORRY 1 IP HE KNEW j HOW EASILY t COULD HIS 816 DATE IS ON! ALMOST IT, BUT NO WAV IN >UCH HER M NOT TO CALL CA-5PER FINDS )T ABOUT MY TMI CITY TO HATCHED jm woft I AT WWW MM CCRN. DECATUR H E R ALO 47TH YEAR 10 ages Decatur, Illinois. SATURDAY EVENING August 18, 928. DEMOS ATTACK HOOVER SILENCE ON 'BLACK GANG' Failure to Denounce Fall, Daugherty and Forbes Draws Foes Fire HIT ILLINOIS RECORD I'M ALBANY, N. Y, Aug 18 -As a counter to the Turn many Issue. Dem- ocrats will rai.se the "conniption" ts- tue against the Republicans in the coming campaign They will blnrne the Republican nominee. Herbert Hoover, specifical- ly for failure to condemn Fall, Daiighcrty and Forbes, follow offi- cials In the Harding administration, and will single out Republican or- in Pennsylvania and Illi- nois for attack. Walsh Lends Attack That became manifest Saturday after a conference here between the Democratic nominee, Gov. Alfred E. Smith, and Senator Thomas J. Walsh, of Montana. Teapot Dome In- Walsh, who left here Saturday aft- er being a guest at the executive niiitiMon ovet night, will take a lead- ing in emphasizing this Issue, assisted by his Democratic colleague, Senator Burton K. Wheeler of Mon- tana who conducced the Investiga- tion into the tenure of Harry M Paughcrty as attoincy gencial in the Hard me; admhmtiation Condemn 1'olicy In a statement utter the confer- ence. Walsh condemned Hoover for falling to speak out about the dis- closure-! of his and Whcclei's Sen- ntc committees regarding activities of DaiiRheity and former Secietary of Interior Albeit B. Full The Senator attacked a Democratic former oenatoi Kobcit L Owen of Oklahoma, who has uused he Tammany issue actnlnst Smith. Vnre, Smith nnd Thompson References to the Republican or- ganizations of STictary of the Ti easury Mellon nnd Senator Wil- lam S. Vate in Pennsylvania and Mayor "Bli? Rill" Thompson in Chicago showed that these will be ncluded as targets for the general ttack. Walsh pnilsccl Smith In his state- ment ami Indicated he will be. a fading factor In the harmonising movement. Is "llnmtin" Candidate Smith's ".s'cnlollty Is Irresistible sml hU Intellectual processes rc- clear." he said. "HU quid: mfisteiy of problems of state signi- fies n genius f t r Midi We do not on widely con-! sldero'l Tint it were vain look for  oung woman's death, Strong refused to cn- laigc on his theories Body in Morgue The patents came hcie Friday night to claim the body. This time they said they positive it wa.1 that of their daughter. Pieviously, vauoub members of the family had issued conflicting statements The body i in a morgue here Saturday, its disposition un- ceitain. If the patents do not bung legal action, it may be buried in Pot- ter's field. NOTE MAY BE CLUE (Hy limltd J'uvs CHICAGO, Aug 18.--A note, hast- ily scrawled on an envelope, and the number of a nlndiana automo- bile license plate, speeded a police investigation Saturday into the death of a young woman believed to ha.ve been buined to death near Crown Point, Ind., Wednesday. The note found on a dresser in the loom of Adeline Zaccard, said "Red, wait for me. Went out for a sandwich' It was signed "Ade." Miss Zaccard was the sweetheait of Angelo Fiancisco, who was shot and killed by a vigilante while flee- ing m an automobile with foui companions after the west McIIenry, 111, bank robbery Monday. Police believed the "Red" of the noto to be another member of the bandit gang An effort was being made to learn his full identity on the theory he made an appointment with Miss Zaccard which later led to her murder, to prevent her from diving police information concern- ing the McHcnry robbery. Meanwhile police sought a car with an Indiana license number which Marshal Louis Hartman of Dyer reported pursuing toward Crown Point shortly before the girl was believed to have been murdered up to a new pace which stait- ecl with prohibition The specJ at which we run our motor cars, op- erate our intricate machinery, and generally live would be impossible with liquor. No, there Is no chance even of modification GETS LJCENSITO WED GIRL; MARRIES HER AUNT (tin I ailcil I'irss 1 JASPER, Ala, Aug. C Livingston, 16, of Carbon Hill, ob- tained parential consent to many Miss Clara Turnei, but instead the young lady's 47 years old aunt, Miss Ophelia Gilbert of Eldridge The youth was said to have courted two months befoie ______o. His father said he was but would not interfere. the the mint for wedding. MAIL ROBBERS KILL FARMER cape of Gangsters Are Shot ROCKFORD PAPERS MERGED SATURDAY linlnl i'lr'< t ROCKFORD, AUK The Rock- foid Register-Gazette and the Rock- ford Morning Star Saturday an nounced a merger effective Sept. 1 The Gazette is an afternoon paper while the Star is the only morning ppper here The papers have n combined circu- lation of about covering Illi- nois and southern Wisconsin. The two plants will make their home in the new structure of the Star, now Hearing completion. Fied E. Steiling, lieutenant gov- ernoi, is editor of the Register-Ga- zette. were wounded in a Saturday when they IJltl Umtrd Picss TORONTO, Ont, Aug. farmer was killed and two others shooting fray attempted to balk the escape of three mail car bandits, accoidmg to reports reach- ing here fiom Waubamik, a small village near Parry Sound, Ont. Early reports said that one bandit was captured in loot wac found on him. A farmer by the name of Jackson, first name unknown, was leported killed According to the leports, the bandits held up a Canadian Pacific tiain and robbed the mail car. The amount of the loss was not known. ASKS TO WED PRINCESS (By Vniti.d Prcts CALCUTTA, Aug. 18 Reports fiom Pcshwar Saturday said that Mustapha Kemal had asked for the hand of the youngest sister of Kins Amanullah. The advices said the king had Invited Kema] to Pesh- war for an informal discussion of Ihp suit LOWER WHEAT ACREAGE (By Vnttid Pi CAS HARRISBURG, Pa, Aug. Pennsylvania farmers will plant 1.- acres of winter wheat this fall, the federal- state crop report- ing service estimated Saturday, as sompared to a planting of acres last fall. Unfavoiable weather is held large- ly responsible for the decreased acre- age to be planted. Y., for a Hoboken, N J., pier to Samson, to be known heieafter as load supplies for the Byrd expcdi- She underwent alterations at the City of New York, is snapped leaving Tebo Yacht Basin, Brooklyn, The Charleston Boy Killed When Struck by Spreader (Special to The Herald) CHARLESTON, Aug 18. .Tack Endsley, aged 6, died early Saturday morning of injuries received Friday afternoon on his father's farm, a mile west of Charleston The boy's father, Roy Endsley, was driving a manure spreader in a field near the family home. The boy was playing around the field apparently at a safe distance from the .spreader wagon As the father turned at the end of a row he disengaged the gear which operates the spiked spreader wheel. As the team straightened odt the father engaged the gear starting the cpikcd wheel to operating. The boy was under the wheel and was struck by the tines on the wheel. His head and neck were pierced by the tines The boy was taken to the Charles- ton Memorial hospital where he died early Saturday morning. He leaves his parents and five broth- ers and sisters. Services will be held in the family home Sunday after- noon. Burial will be in the Roselawn cemetery which adjoins the Endsley farm. GIRL SHIELDING MOTHER, SLAIN Father Kills Daughter During Family Quarrel; Then Shoots Wife Mn'rrf Piris CHICAGO, Aug. Wil- lock, gave her life Saturday, per- haps vainly, to save that of her mother. When her father, Leo Willock, 35, painter, picked up a revolver during a quarrel with his wife, Sarah ran In front of the woman to shield her. Willock fired and the girl fell, fatal- ly wounded. The painter then shot and danger- ously wounded his wife. DURANT PLEDGES HOOVER SUPPORT (Hy United Pi ess 1 NEW YORK, Aug. C. Durant, motor car manufacturer, will support Herbert Hoover for president he announced Saturday before sailing for Europe. Durant al- so said he opposed modification or repeal of the prohibition law. HIP-fOCKET RAID ON NEW YORK PIER BRINGS STORM OF PROTEST Ilill Hinted Aug. NEW high in social and business circles were threatening protests to the government Saturday because of a "hip-pocket" raid, latest feature of the attempt to dry up New York. The search, which was conducted on the lie de France, on which Sec- retary of State Frank B. Kellogg a passenger to Europe, came after a federal grand jury had issued sub- prominent persons, with violating the penas for 125 charging them prohibition law by drinking in night clubs. No Liquor Found Four thousand persona were ac- sembled at the French line piers Friday night, many of them In even- and others were bidding goodbye. Federal agents blocked the exits from the off pier and the boat the visitors just before it ing clothes. Some were passengers sailed, many of them were searched. No liquor was found. In reply to in- dignant protests, dry agents told the visitors that "orders were orders." Check Tourists Movements It was said that the government was carefully checking the move- ments of many Americans now in Europe and that subpenas would be handed to them when they landed in the United States, Although the list was kept secret, dry agents said there were many res- idents of the exclusive Park Avenue section on it, and that it also in- cluded prominent opeiators in Wall SMITH PLANS TO SPEND WEEK-END ON GOLF COURSE Chicago Police Order Arrest of Financier Hearing Monday in Springfield on Requisition from Missouri for Return of International Life Insurance Company Head PASSENGER THROWN FROM PLANE WHEN AVIATOR LOOPS (lilt United Prcfs MT. CLEMENS, Mich Aug. 18 A. W. Redfield was thrown from a looping airplane, but landed safely in his parachute feet below. Lieut. K. W. Matheson, Selfrldge Field pilot did not know his passenger had fallen until he landed the plane. SOUTHERN RIVER FLOODS PASSING i By United CHICAGO, Aug. 18 Roy Toombs, sought on a warrant charg Ing embezzlement of from the International Life Insurant company of St. Louis, failed Satur- day to appear in court, contrary f the promise of his attorney, Eugen" McGarry, police said. Deputy police commissioner John Stegc ordered his men to rcdoubl' their efforts to find and arre. Toombs, who is in seclusion. The state bank and trust of Downers Grove, of which Toomb was head, was closed Saturday fo investigation by officials of th' bank. Belief that the Instiutfon sound was expressed by State Audi- tor Oscar Nelson. He said, howevei that adverse publicity from the fi nancier's escapade had caused stea- dy withdrawals. Toombs' bond has been set ci McGarry, who claims to the only one knowing the financier' whereabouts, is not expected to prn 12 Known Dead in Carolmas auce Mm untn Monday. Edwin D. Buell Saturday wa 38 neSUll 01 i named federal receiver in thr Toombs-Daly brokerage compan. Olwl bankruptcy case by Garfleld Charle-- rcferee In bankruptcy. I lilted ATLANTA, Ga., Aug. 18.- Rivers rwollen by rains of a tropical storm that has taken 12 lives and caused damage m the millions, poured down towards the sea Saturday from the flood damaged Piedmont belt of the Carollnas and inundated wide reaches of plainland. Hundreds of families near Colum- bia, S. C., and Augusta, Ga, were forced from their homes. Above Columbia the flood waters of the Broad and Saluda rivers con- verged into the Congaree and the rram stream was at its highest level in 20 years. The same situation ex- isted near Augusta where'the Savan- nah river stretched miles out of its banks. In Virginia the flood menace was worst along the James as swollen rivers to the west poured their sur- plus into that stream. Across the Savannah from Au- gusta, Ga.. the town of Hamburg, 8 negro settlement, was under water to Its roofs. The fled to Augusta. 200 inhabitants Lnitcd 1 ALBANY, N Y Aug Al- fred E. Smith cleared his desk Sat- urday and prepared to devote the weekend to resting. The Democratic Presidential nominee said he had memorized his acceptance speech and had purposely scheduled no confer- ences because he wanted to spend as much time as possible on the golf links Saturday and Sunday. Beginning Monday, Smith expects to be even busier than he was this week. The notification will be held Wednesday evening and before then the governor expects members of the Democratic national committee to drop In for informal conferences. Besides completing and memoriz- ing his acceptance speech, Smith has had five important conferences this week, some of which lasted almost an entire day. PICKETS HARASS KELLOGG SAILING Secretary of State Sails for France to Sign Anti- War Pact fBji Uitltnl Pici 1 NEW YORK, Aug. of State Kellogg is on his way to Fiance to sign with 14 other nations on an anti-war pact, growing out of negotiations between Kellogg and Foreign Minister Briand of France. He sailed early Saturday on the French liner He de France, declin- ing to discuss with reporters the in ternatlonal nature of his trip. As the He de France drew awiiy from the pier, more than 100 mem- bers of the All-American Anti-Im- perialist league appeared on the dock waving banners which they hat smuggled on the pier beneath their boats. Police chased them away. "Down with American impeiialism one of the banneis read. Others said: "Down with Kellogg's falte peace treaty" and "hands off Nlca- icgua" HOOVER VISITS SITES FOR DAM Republican Nominee Leaves Day in Grand Canyon a federal subpena on his appearance u a Buell's appointment followed thr appearance In state court of Gary, who asked that state asset- in the case be turned over to the federal court. Buell has qualified for the receii- ershlp, but acceptance of the assets is held up for the correction of some minor difficulties Involved. Service of Toombs for material witness In the bankruptcy proceedings has been arranged be- tween McGarry and Referee Charle.- HEARING MONDAY 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication