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Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: October 26, 1990 - Page 1

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Location: Chicago, Illinois

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   Daily Herald (Newspaper) - October 26, 1990, Chicago, Illinois                               I 11 I ill crown ICO of Douglas v. i. 3 S ents F E EATHER Wanning up Sunny and with a high in the middle 50s and south wfnds 10 to 20 mph. fa ir and with a low near 40. UBURBANNEWS TCI weather Cable weather offered by TCI may make a comeback in sev- eral rebounding from an earlier service-ending lightning strike Page 3. Sites annexed Two pieces of property recently awarded by the courts to Roll- ing Meadows in a land dispute with Palatine have been an- naxed to the city Page 3. Deaf ear Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy rejected the latest United Nations censure of Israel and urged the world to focus on in- stead on Kuwait Page 8. b Deadly cargo A Roman Catholic man said he thought he was driving to his when IRA gunmen strapped him into a van loaded with explosives Page 9. E USINESS Home sales drop Eeclining consumer confidence a the Persian Gulf crisis pushed September sales of ex- isting homes down 8 tJie slowest pace in nearly three Section 2. Work ethic Local companies were among 42 Illinois employers honored for their roles in helping refu- gees successfully resettle in Illi nois Section 2. f ACKMABLEY i Healthy climate Arizonans may shrink from a 1 tttle old Chicago cold but we know that winter's hardships are what make Midwesterners strong Back Page I I V l UBURBANLIVING Moms just say Working mothers caught be- tween damands on the job and at home have to learn to set priorities and turn down assign- time managers advise Section Page 8. i HDEX t 7-15 Dr. SHOWCASE Artistic look i The face of is among works of artist Ed Paschke featured at the Art Institute in Chicago. Daily Herald staff writer Tom Valeo profiles the artist and his work Section 6 Punch cards set for Washington Party BY LAURA JANOTA Daily Herald Staff Writer Weary election officials in Cook County and Chicago were sent scrambling Thursday as the U.S. Su- preme Court ordered the Harold Washington Party back on the Nov. 6 election ballot. With no time to election of- ficials began preparing for potential- ly cumbersome punch-card voting at polls all over the county in an effort to comply with the high court's or- der. Plans for the punch-card in which Cook County voters will use paper ballots to find numbers that must be located and punched out on corresponding left the possi- bility of lines at the polls and delays in ballot casting Nov. 6. I nstead of having the ballot book they'll hold it in their hand. there's sur- prisingly Tom for Chicago Board of Election Commissioners The task of printing new programming computers and rear- ranging equipment also could cost Cook County up to million. Election called it the fairest way to run the election given the because all the Harold Washington Party would appear on the same ballot in appropriate places. want this election held by the sixth of November by we've got to do asserted Cook County Clerk Stanley T. Kusper in charge of suburban elections. The U.S. Supreme Court ordered that an Aug. 29 Cook County Elector- al Board decision allowing 19 Harold Washington Party candidates on the ballot be followed rather than subse- quent Illinois court rulings that bumped the party off the ballot. i L y A Met train in Anttoch Thursday to let off officials who toured a proposed commuter line along the Wisconsin Central Ry. freight IFne. Daily Heraw All aboard to Proposed Cook-Lake commuter rail line BY MARIA MOOSHIL Daily Herald Staff Writer n Communities Vernon Buffalo Prospect Dss Plaines What It will About Possible commuter stations million. B Cost of proposed V Prospect Heights million Wheeling. million Buffalo Grove million Lincolnshire Vernon Hills million Mundelein million Libertyville North Suburban Mass Transit District. Llhcolnahtro m m Poiea Daily Herald Graphic Supporters of a proposed million commuter route from Chicago to Antioch along an ex- isting freight line said a simulat- ed ride Thursday signals the ad- vent of the even if Metra officials would call the event only a get-acquainted tour. didn't say it was a kickoff. But that's how I view said Verna L. Buffalo Grove village president and a leading advocate of the new commuter line. really shows you where they're said Vernon Hills Village President Barbara Wil- liams. nice to Metra directors and staff members said their special See METRA on Page U.S. to seek Saudi OK for attack United Press International WASHINGTON Secretary of State James Baker is expected to travel to Saudi Arabia within the next 10 days to secure Saudi permis- sion for a military strike against Iraq if that option is deemed neces- sources said Thursday. Diplomatic sources said the latest decision is a strong signal to Iraq that the United States is deadly se- rious about its stand that Saddam Hussein must unconditionally with- draw his troops from Kuwait. Prince Bandar Bin the Saudi ambassador to the United met with Undersecretary of State for Affairs Robert Kimmitt and the State Department's top expert on Morris Busbie. As he Bandar ques- tion of war and peace is in the hands of Saddam Baker is expected to make a major Persian Gulf jwlicy speech in Los Angeles on Monday and U.S. and other officials the intended im- pression will be that hopes for a negotiated solution are shrinking and the chances for a military solution is growing. In another Secretary of De- fense Dick Chaney confirmed that the present U.S. force in Saudi Ara- now standing at may be increased soon by another troops. Baker's schedule is not but the trip is expected to start dur- ing the first weekend of November. The inclusion of Busbie in the Ban- dar meeting as Busbie said in an interview last that President Bush deadly about any attack on the United States or its Arab allies. The United States is concerned that terrorist attacks could be launched against Western or Arab nations allied against Iraq's invasion of its tiny oil-rich neighbor on Aug. 2. The electoral board decision al- lows the party's countywide slate and city county commissioner candi- dates on the while candidates for suburban county commissioner and Metropolitan Water Reclama- tion District are voided due to lack of sigrialures from the suburbs. Issuing an order that the all-black party be placed on the ballot until further review of the case is the U.S. Supreme Court left open the possibility that it could refuse after the election to consider the case or may even find the party didn't be- long on the ballot at all. Election experts say that could spell problems for Harold Washing- ton Party candidates if they win the including the possibility that they could be turned out of off- ice. CT10N But most agreed that the Court's action Thursday she the Harold Washington Par charges that signature requ for Cook County elections a would prevail. a good indication could find the electio said Coo Electoral Board Attorney Odelson. is a complete victo a complete victory for the Supreme wed that which irements e uncon- hat they statute c County Jurton S. for See BALLOT o i Page 4 Budget deal hik beer taxes and hits wealths r Associated Press WASHINGTON Bargainers set- tled disputes over paring Medicare benefits and wrestled over other cuts and tax breaks Thursday as top lawmakers predicted passage of the broad deficit-reduction bill support- ed by President Bush. Under the almost-forged compro- consumers would pay more for cigarettes and beer. But the wealthiest Americans would face income-tax increases averaging 6.3 percent as well. None of the outstanding differenc- es was seen as a deal-killer for the billion collection of tax increas- es and spending reductions. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said Bush liked the emerging and that seemed to stamp out the possibility of any last-minute set- back. House Speaker Thomas S. said he expected the House to approve the measure Friday. And little trouble was expected in the Senate later. As many as 4 million slightly less well-to-do couples and individuals including most members of Congress could get a tax cut because the top rate on their now 33 would drop to 31 percent. They also would get the bill's only tax break for capital nothing like President R posed deep cut in taxes which are profits f r ments. But it would from paying a capital-j higher than 28 percent. The richest would see their top tax from 28 percent to 31 per those with incomes above the mark c portion of their itemized d The whose still being negotiated and would raise taxo billion over the next. But for most people the only increasi in consumer taxes. The bill would raise th gallon gasoline tax and i diesel tax by 5 cents each. The tax on cents a would rise on Jan. 1 and to 24 cents later. Taxes on other tobacco would go uj cent in each of those yean The levy on a k of now 16 would a. Negotia- tors are deciding whether to raise the tax on now s for a gallon of to ..70 or The 3-cent levy on a f if .h of table wine would rise to 21 or 2 tins. It is ash's pro- capital invest- nt anyone ains rate taxpayers rate rise Even t slightly ould lose a ions were subject to by about five years. in would be 9-cent-a- 15 -cent now 16 o 20 cents two years igars and by 25 per- A day after what was described as a calm return xi Thursday to Herrick House Children's Center in Ban a shelter for troubled teen-agers. Daily Hwaw t Boucher Resignations may have ignited teen i iot The resignations of three temporary staff members may have provoked a riot at a state- run shelter for troubled teen- age girls in Bartlett. In 15 people were 14 of them residents of the Herrick House Children's Center had periodic figl ts out there but I can't -ecall ever having something c f this Bartlett PC lice Chief William McHugh s aid. For see Page 10. Dist. 214 gives superintendent raise to BY BETH WILSON DailyHeraldStaffWriter Northwest Suburban High School District 214 Superintendent Stephen D. Berry will receive a 9 percent bringing his annual salary to as part of a three-year con- board members announced The vote to grant the though did not occur without some reservations expressed by board member David R. who said the raise was too high. A 7 percent raise would be more Wiltse noting that negotiations fcr a new teachers' con- tract will begin this year. UI didn't want to set a he explained. Wiltse approved the raise because he said a dissenting vote might b-3 misconstrued as a mark against Berry's performance. Berry has done a good job. He has restored confidence in the super- said Wiltse. school board member Stanley B. Eisenhammer and school board President Lester A. Jensen said the raise was No other board members spoke out on the matter. After the contract was Berry expressed his gratitude. to the board for your confi- he come out of some difficult one of the highest paid su- perintendents in the took the reins of the state's second-largest school district in after a brief stint as deputy superintendent. Prior to Berry was principal of Elk Grove High School and an assistant principal at Wheeling High School. Berry is now receiving more than Gerald superintendent of Palatine-Schaumburg High School District 211. Chapman makes be- tween and Robert E. District 214 perintendent for persom Berry's new contrac- June 1993. His salar ed yearly. He received cent pay raise in 1989 his salary to School board membt the new raise after closed-door member completes a evaluation of Berry bef salary is reached. assistant su- el said. extends to is negotiat- an 8.6 per- vhich raised rs approved 3 months of Each board i individual an exact t- ii 14 V i1 ii 1 f   

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