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Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: August 25, 1990 - Page 1

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Publication: Daily Herald

Location: Chicago, Illinois

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   Daily Herald (Newspaper) - August 25, 1990, Chicago, Illinois                               White Sox defeat 5-a War's good for bad for people 8 Sections SPORTS Bears fall to Raiders The Bears' Neal Anderson rushes against the Raiders' de- fense during Chicago's 20-3 preseason loss to Los Angeles Friday night Section 3. mam. Steamy side of life Partly very warm and with a 30 percent chance of afternoon or evening thunderstorms The high will roach around 85 to 90. Energy project An energy conservation project designed to stabilize utility costs for low- to moderate-in- come homeowners will be tried in Arlington Heights Page 3 Abortion conflict A federal judge on Friday sti tick down provisions of Penn- sylvania's restrictive abortion law. The state said immediately it would appeal Page 3 USINESt Economic signs mixed Economic news was a mixed bag with the gross na- tional product and corporate profit reports but stocks up and oil prices down as fears of a Middle East war eased The U S. economy grew at a sluggish annual rate of 1.2 and the GNP grew for the fifth consecutive quarter at a pace below 2 percent Section 4 1-6 Home Stocki 4-4 K n 9 jviP fi Pyramid power If a trip to Cairo isn't in the the next best thing is to visit the pyramid house in Lake County This tourists also can visit the re-creation of King Tut's tomb Section 2. Hussein's troops circle embassies Soviets end U.N. deadlock on using force in blockade Associated Pros Saddam Hussein made diplo- mats his latest target ringing foreign missions in Kuwait with Iraqi troops and de- taining a group of U.S. Embassy staff and dependents who had been promised safe passage from his capital. Britain said tanks sur- rounded its and the wa- ter and power were cut. Diplomats made Hussein a tar- too. In a dramatic reversal the Soviets said they would back a U.S. resolution in the Security Council calling for the use of force to halt all ship- ping to and from Iraq. They also said they would con- sider joining an international na- val force to enforce a U.N.-or- dered trade embargo. The full council worked late Friday and was expected to overwhelmingly approve the res- olution before dawn representing a diplomatic victory for the United States. Approval would give Security Council blessing to a loosely orga- nized international force using its own rules of engagement to en- force the U.N. embargo against Iraq. Earlier in the Soviet Pres- ident Mikhail S. Gorbachev sent an urgent message to Hussein warning that the Persian Gulf sit- uation was danger- The conflict came home to hun- dreds of U.S. military reservists called up in the first such sum- mons since Vietnam. At least nine embassies in Kuwait including the U.S. and British missions were guarded by-troops Friday as diplomats de- fied an Iraqi order to close their doors. With its Aug. 2 conquest of Kuwait and its quick annexation of the small oil state. A European envoy said Bagh- dad threatened to use force to re- move diplomats remaining at their posts on Saturday. The Iraqis also threatened to cut wa- ter and power to the and the Foreign Office in London said they did just that on Friday at the British Embassy. Like other embassies staying the U.S. mission had a skeleton staff of about 10. More than 100 U.S. Embassy staff and including about 30 left Kuwait only to find new trouble in where they were detained. White Marlin Fitzwater said Friday the Iraqis had promised earlier to allow the group of Americans to but then reneged. arc he said but stuck. The official Iraqi News Agency said later that Iraq would only An Apache helicopter gunthip skims over the Saudi desert Friday morning. The Apache is the Army's first defense against Iraq's tanks. could take out 200 in about two said the commanding pilot. Associated Press PHOIO Army set to sic its 'junkyard dogs' on tanks It is eerily cool and quiet above the Saudi and the forward unit of the 101st Air- borne Division's air-assault bri- gade is displaying the killing force of Apache helicopters. These junkyard dogs of the Army's air are tank and they will be ihe first into battle against Iraqi forces if fighting breaks out. See story on Page 5. detain the male embassy employ- ees including diplomats of those countries that refused to close their embassies in occupied Kuwait. But there was no indica- tion the dependents were being allowed to leave. Besides the about Westerners including Americans were caught in Iraq and Iraqi-occupied Kuwait by the invasion. Gorbachev's message to Hussein appeared to be a warning that the Soviet Union would go along with the Western powers unless Iraq quickly took steps to withdraw from Kuwait and free foreign hostages. Gorbachev urged Iraq to com- ply immediately with U.N. Secur- ity Council resolutions and warned that failure to do so would prompt the Se- curity Council to take corre- sponding additional the Soviet news agency Tass said. The Soviet ambassador to the Valentin V. laler announced in New York that Mos- cow was ending its resistance to backing the U.N.-ordered embar- go with military muscle Embassies in Kuwait Foreign diplomats to leaye if Tk M jf v' m iFr rt- f. V I surrounded or patrolled by Iraqi troops The Oxford Map of Canadian and French Government 9 reserve units here on alert BY DAN ROZEK and DIANE DUNGEY Dally Hei aid Staff Writers AP The Pentagon's call-up of mili- tary reserves reached Illinois Friday as nine Army and Navy units including some based in the suburbs were placed on alert and warned to prepare for active congressional lead- ers said. Although the units were told they could be mobilized with 24 hours it remains uncertain which if will actually be called political and mili- tary leaders said. The units reportedly placed on alert include two National four Army and three Navy Reserve units. The Navy outfits were identi- fied as Medical Unit based at Great Lakes Naval Training Center near North Chi- Naval Hospital Philadel- phia 113 Unit and Mideast 313 Naval Control of Shipping both based in west suburban For- est Park. The National Guard uniUs placed on alert were Company E of the 106th Aviation which is based in Decattir and at Midway Airport in and See RESERVES i mPage 5 CRISIS GULF Children's terror The stoic expressions of Ihe British hostage children with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in Thursday's video looked all too familiar and frightened. rather Our man in Kuw.iit As the clock ran out on the Iraqi deadline for closing em- bassies in the Man on the spot was Nathaniel a 50-year-old veteran of Middle East trouble spots See stories on Page 15. Traffic relief due on Euclid Ave. BY JANET HALLMAN Dally Herald Staff Writer The body of a newborn girl mysteriously washed ashore at Irene Lake in Palatine Thursday. Dairy Heraw Photo Poh'ce have scant leads in probe of newborn's death Within the next eastbound traffic on construction-clogged Eu- clid Avenue in Arlington Heights will be able to travel on the right side of the road again. Since traffic heading east between Douglas Avenue and Water- man Avenue has had to do so in the left lane to avoid construction activi- ty. The Cook County Highway Depart- ment has been working to create three lanes and add curbs and gutters in most of the area between Douglas Avenue and Rand Road. Now that the county has replaced all but about two inches of the as- phalt in the right one-way traf- fic will be switched over to that lane until both lanes between Douglas Av- enue and Rand Road are re-opened in late Arlington Heights village traffic engineer Tom Ponsot said The switch will allow traffic to travel in just one lane up to Rand rather than jogging over from the left to the right lane at Water- man Cook County engineer Jerry Jednoroz said. Complete landscaping between Douglas Avenue and Rand as well as the five-lane reconstruction work between Rand Road and Route 83 in Mount will take until September 1991 to Jedno- roz said. been bad pretty much all and we might not get all the asphalt in this he said think once we get done every- one will be very and you'll never know we were here Construction between Douglas and Waterman has been delayed by a problem with storm sewor installa- tion at where an extension of the existing sewer did not hit right on grade. Heavy rainfall also lus set the work schedule back by about two Ponsot said. Despite the he the village has received relatively few complaints and has tried lo keep res- idents informed on the progress of construction. say maybe if we got IS calls over a week or two that was about the Ponsot said about telephone inquires on the progress of the million county project. BY ROBIN SMITH Dally Heiald Staff Writer The partially decomposed body of a newborn which washed up on the gravel shore of Irene Lake in has left few clues for po- lice now searching for the mother. Law enforcement officials and employees at the Twin Lakes Recre- ation Area speculate a young teen- age between the ages of 15 and may have carried the baby full-term. She then delivered it her- self and not knowing what to placed the infant near or in Salt Creek. The creek feeds into the storm water retention pond known as Irene Lake. Police are hoping the girl may have needed medical attention after and they will be able to track her down through medical records. They will question local hos- pital officials and doctors today. To actually determine how the baby police may need ICC calls for ComEd rate hike BY LAURAJANOTA Daily Herald Staff Writer Dally Herald Map to have the mother tell them. An au- topsy report Friday could not deter- mine the cause of death. The body was spotted Thursday afternoon by two park district youths picking up golf balls hit into the lake from the nearby driving See CLUE on Page 4 The staff of the Illinois Commerce Commission recommended Friday that electricity rates for Com- monwealth Edison be increased by up to 14.8 percent so the company can cover costs for three of its nucle- ar power plants. ICC staff called for the electricity giant's rates to rise by million or depending on which accounting method is to figure how much the company deserves in compensation for the Byron II plant near Rockford and the Braidwood I and II plants near Joliet. Cathy a spokeswoman for projected the average residen- tial customer could pay or more per month under the rate in- crease proposals. The Citizens Utility a utili- ty watchdog immediately called the ICC staff proposal for a Commonwealth Edison rate increase too high and while a spokesman for the company said the proposed increase is not enough. The ICC is expected to rule by next March on Commonwealth Edi- son's request for billion to pay for the power plants. The staff's proposals are among many recommendations ICC com- missioners will consider. think the numbers show that there should be a rate CUB Executive Director Susan Stewart said. the very there should be no rate increase at she said. Robert regulatory af- fairs director for Commonwealth called the ICC staff proposal and said some plant costs that auditors have recommend- ed not be charged lo electric should be included in the r.itcs believe that either .iccounting methodology used comes up way too short in terms of what we need and what we're asking Berdelle said. The ICC recommendation released Friday is the first official staff posi- still on Com- monwealth Edison's request for billion to pay for Byron II and Braidwood I and II. Under the Commonwealth Edison rates would rise about 23 per- cent or per month for the aver- age residential Monroe said.   

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