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Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: February 01, 1990 - Page 1

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Publication: Daily Herald

Location: Chicago, Illinois

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   Daily Herald (Newspaper) - February 1, 1990, Chicago, Illinois                               'protest Of'Urtj'shot 8 PADDaOkiPUBLlCATIONS February 1990 6 Sections 35 Cents Thursday WEATHER Windy and wet Windy and turning with a 70 percent chance of rain and a high in the low 40s. Colder to- with rain turning to snow. SUBURB AN NEWS Pedersen endorsed Illinois Chamber's political arm is endorsing Bernard E. Peder- sen for the 54th legislative dis- trict because of his efforts to promote business Page 3. Trim extras Residents told Dist. 54 board members to trim extras like air conditioning from their long- range plans to win two tax in- crease referendums Page 3. INSIDE No special privileges Deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega is another with a window in his cell and standard cafeteria food at a federal prison Page 9. 5 Mexicans indicted The former head of the Mexican Federal Judicial Police and four others were indicted on charges of participating in a DBA agent's murder Page 3. SHOWCASE Director's debut As a Second City Kevin Crowley was at his best in scenes that highlighted the sweetness and sheer weirdness of real life. Crowley debuts as a director with saw Pact In Its Own not the best scenes involve the eccentric side of reality Section Page 6. BUSINESS Economic strength The government's main gauge of future economic activity showed surprising strength in December because of a surge in orders for manufactured the Commerce Department re- ported Section Page 1. INOEX Dr. SUBURBAN LIVING Fun and games It's the biggest game show prize on And it's given away each week on the Fortune spon- sored by the Illinois State Lot- tery. Though the show presents little challenge to Lot- tery officials say it has earned high ratings from viewers who tune in to see the glamour and excitement Section 3. Bush calls for sharp cuts in combat troops 'Time is right to move forward' AgociileJPren_____________________ WASHINGTON President acclaiming the of in Eastern pro- posed a sharp new cut in U.S. and Soviet combat troops Wednesday saying in his first State of the Union address time is right to move in Eu- rope. Bush also announced plans to withdraw all of the nearly troops sent to Panama in an inva- sion to oust Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega before the end of With ambassadors from across the world in Bush told a joint session of Congress and a national broadcast audi- are in a period of great great yet great uncertainty... events of the year just ended the revolution of '89 have been a chain change so striking that it marks the beginning of a new era in the world's Bush asked his the world we knew as 1989 In the year Communist governments gave way In East Bulgaria and Czecho- slovakia. Within the Soviet there are drives for some level of independence from the Baltics to the Caucuses and in between. In such idea called America is Hours before he delivered his Bush telephoned Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to advise him of bis proposal to cut U.S. and Soviet forces in Cen- tral Europe to on each side. In his Bush recognize that the Soviet military threat jn Europe is di- minishing but we see change in Soviet strategic mod- ernization. But the time is right to move forward on a con- ventional arms-control agree- ment to move us to more appro- priate levels of military forces in His troop cutback proposal won immediate praise from Demo- including Sen. Sam chairman of the Armed Services- who said it fit changing circumstances in Eu- rope and the fiscal at home. The troop offer was the surprise centerpiece of a speech in which Bush also proposed lofty goals for American schools and prodded lawmakers to approve his plans for a capital gains tax cut and bills dealing with clean child edu- cation and other issues. time to act Bush said in a speech intended to help set an election-year agenda Congress. He conoemned racially Bush announced now troop cuts In his first State of See BUSH on Page 3 the Union message Wednesday night. Associated Photo District 25 may sell off closed schools to boost funds BY MELISSA REISER Daily Herald Staff Writer Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 school board members to- day will look at property the district owns with an eye toward selling ex- cess buildings to boost will look at the whole district and all our facilities and go over the pros and cons of the buildings we said Superintendent Daniel B. Keck. Keck added that the meeting is mainly for discussion purposes and he does not expect the board to take action to sell any buildings at this time. But the board could direct staff to have appraisals done on buildings it believes are unneces- he said. The school district recently has been faced with serious budget cons- traints and school board members have said the district probably will have to ask voters within the next few years to approve another tax in- crease referendum to pay for in- creased operating costs within the next few years. Last the dis- trict won voter approval of a million referendum for school addi- tions and renovations. Keck said the district's budget dif- ficulty is leading the board to look into selling excess facilities in order to have more cash on-hand. But the district also must be care- ful to keep enough buildings in case enrollment increases and it needs to open another Keck said. want to make sure we always keep enough on hand in case we he said. have to have a contingency Currently the 'district uses eight elementary Ivy Westgate-Dwyer and Wind- sor. The district owns four additional elementary school Park and Belmont. Two district junior high schools are used for South and Thomas. The district still owns Miner and two closed junior high schools. Most of the district's extra buildings are leased to other organizations for use. The school board will meet at p.m. in the administration 301W. South St. Mixed signals for the economy The index of leading the goverment's main gauge of future economic showed strength In December because of strong manufactured goods orders. The stock market surged 47.30 points finishing at 2.590.54. New single family homes fell 9.6 percent In December. Set stories in Business Governor candidates all oppose runways BY DAVE MCKINNEY Dally Herald Staff Wrter Bensenyllle resident Thomas states his opinion. Dally Ptorrt Suburban who have de- clared war against expansion at O'Hare International got all three gubernatorial campaigns Wednesday to come out squarely against any new runways at O'Hare. That issue is fast becoming a hot political topic as Chicago gropes to find ways to lessen chronic delays averaging 10 at the world's busiest air port. Democratic candidate Neil Har- tigan and Republican candidate Steve Baer were joined by state Sen. Robert Republican Jim Edgar's running at Ben- senville's Fenton High School to jay out their plans on the volatile issue that has split the city and sub- urbs. About 400 noise-weary residents listened to the as jet airplanes flew closely overhead and at times interrupted the forum. Hartigan flatly opposed new run- See O'HARE on Pope 4 Gorbachev denies rumors of his resignation Associated Press MOSCOW Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday denied a report he might resign as head of the Commu- nist Party while remaining Soviet and a leading newspaper called him too valuable to risk los- ing. Another the party dai- ly urged authorities to strengthen the powers of the presi- dency to protect Gorbachev from ef- forts to oust him. Correspondents covering Gorba- chev's meeting with Brazilian presi- dent-elect Fernando Collor de Mello asked about a Western television re- port that he was considering quitting the party leadership. this is Gorba- chev said in remarks that led the So- viet television news Wednesday night. is in someone's interest to propagate such He added that similar rumors are becoming common in the Soviet Un- and demonstrates that we are a different a different society. Everything is and discussed Gorbachev has strengthened the presidency and tried to shift power from the ruling Communist Party to the elected government. But it is far from clear whether the reforms have gone far enough for him to dare relinquishing the top post in the par- which has been the source of pow- er for all previous Soviet leaders. The Pravda based on a de- bate among prominent appeared to tell readers that party power still is paramount and that the presidency is not strong enough to be the country's main leadership post. The political turmoil comes while the Soviet Union is torn by national- ist and ethnic violence in Azerbaijan. It also comes just five days before what is expected to be a fiery meet- ing of the party's Central Committee the one body with the official power to remove Gorbachev as par- ty leader. A ear turned fn front of school bus Wednesday in Pahrtlne. people sustained minor Injuries. 1 i 3 suffer minor injuries in car-bus crash Three eole atained minor 'HjckiKoad in front of the 1 to a t toShkrt R. f schwl bus 28 students Paddock School In struck a car at Avenue Birt was charged with failure to and Hicks Koad in Palatine. accident was the sec- bus was traveling fyat onjlli- ond area crash involving a nois Avenue arotmd school bus in aiwek. Poor Chit whffli an eastboond oar driven dren were injured Friday in an accHJttitlnBarrington.SeeBto- Lake Zurich turned north ryoVPagei v ter escapes Coast Guard drug check Annotated NEW ORLEANS A Coast Guard cutter sprayed a Cuban-oper- ated freighter with machine-gun fire and shells when the ship refused to stop for a drug but the vessel escaped into Mexican officials said. The 250-foot Hermann took sever- al hits from the cutter Chincoteague as it was chased for more than 26 hours across the Gulf of said Coast Guard spokesman Joe Gibson. Coast Guardsmen saw no evidence of casualties aboard the said Jack a Coast .Guard spokesman in Washington. When the Panama-registered ship reached Mexican the 110- foot Coast Guard cutter held fire and asked the government to take over and determine whether the vessel was carrying Gibson .said.-'. were in international wa- Gibson cannot pur- sue vessels into other countries' wa- The Hermann steamed on companied toward the central Mexi- can coast. two Mexican navy vessels escorted the ship to the port of and authorities began searching the the Foreign Ministry said. The inspection was ex- pected to take at least 24 hours. The official Cuban news agency Prensa Latina reported that the with a 12-man was carrying 10 tons of the element chromium and was operated by the Guamar Ship- ping Co. of Cuba. said the Coast Guard talked to the ship's master by radio and the captain claimed the vessel had no cargo. He said the Coast Guard's law enforcement divi- sion believes the ship carried which can be either chromi- um or an alloy of the element. An official at the Cuban diplomat- ic mission in Washington called the incident a provocation. Secretary of State James A. Baker III disagreed. was not an attack and a provo- Baker told reporters. were engaged in a legal law enforce- ment   

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