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Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: November 19, 1989 - Page 1

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Publication: Daily Herald

Location: Chicago, Illinois

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   Daily Herald (Newspaper) - November 19, 1989, Chicago, Illinois                               fesira! Extra! College, prep preview Ixtra Section 1A-B Use searves decorate If tnir home OPEH 4 PADDOCK PUBLICATIONS Sunday, November 19; 1989 Sunday WEATHER It's warming op "Windy and much manner, with partly sunny skies and a high around 50. Partly cloudy, windy and wanner tonigt t, with a low around 40. INSIDE Bulgarians protest A crowd estimated at burned portraits of the nation's ousted leader Satui day at Com- munist Bulgaria's Uggest-ever rally Page 3. ETCETERA Heartfelt charity "Heartstrings: The National Tour" more than lived up to its name, as the evenir g of hope to benefit AIDS research and care came to Chicago. Celebrities, including Sandy Duncan and singer Sam Raker, way to tears and heart-tug jing moments with their perfor- mances Page 14 BUSINESS Molex connects "Molex is a very quality company that's out of favor right says business exec in describing tie Lisle- based of connec- tors Section 2. SHOWCASE Front row center Verdi's famous opeia, "Don is the Lyric Dpera of Chicago's most ambitios offer- ing to date. Classical music crit- ic Bill Gowen reviews the pro- duction Section 6 Page 3. SPECIAL SECTION Tradition today The making of a menorable wedding is filled with frills and festivities food and flowers. Our bridal guide offers infor- mation about area retailers who specialize in making weddings wonderful. Appearir g in Neigh- bor section with Weddings and Engagements. USA WEEKEND In honor of Thanksgiving, an es- say on the new meaning of trad- ition features seven lamilies from various states, including Michigan, Mississippi, Idaho, Wisconsin, California and Ohio. 12 14 DISCOVERY Heartland holidays Cedarburg. Wis., and Indianapo- lis are two Midwest destina- tions to put on your ti aveling list this season. Cedai burg of- fers its famous holiday boutique, and Indy celebrates with 92 Christmas trees lining Market Street and more than multi-colored li ghts deco- rating Monument Circle. These two towns also offer tourists plenty of attractions ''ear-round Section 6. Congress set to repeal catastrophic illness law WASHINGTON Congress may give final approval Sunday to a bill repealing the landmark 1988 cata- strophic illness insurance law for senior citizens, but some angry Sen- ate Republicans have vowed to block the effort. "We can't do this to seniors in a bitter Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., told colleagues ear- ly Saturday after he learned Senate negotiators debating the catastroph- ic illness law had reluctantly voted to accept the House position de- manding repeal. McCain urged that the Senate stick with its original position, adopted last month on a 99-0 vote, of repealing the law's controversial in- come-based surtax but keeping some new benefits. Those benefits were to be funded by a small increase in the basic premium paid by all cata- strophic law beneficiaries He warned that if the law is repealed and benefits now in place expire on Jan. 1, some senior citizens will be evicted from their nursing homes and the price of Medicare supplemental insurance on the pri- vate market will skyrocket Anger by wealthier seniors and by some vocal elderly advocacy groups at the1 income-based surtax spurred calls for the law's repeal. As the Senate worked into the ear- ly morning hours Saturday, McCain told fellow senators he would "use every legitimate parliamentary tac- tic available to me to see that this incredible injustice is not perpetrat- ed." Faced with thousands of letters and petitions from angry seniors calling for changes in the 1988 law, Congress has haggled for months over whether to reform the measure or repeal it Chicago welcome warms cold day for Lech Walesa By JOHN CARPENTER Dally Herald StaB Writer In Washington, Lech Walesa found a nation's capital of pomp and circumstance, of politicians struggling to ride his bandwagon and share his spotlight. In New York, he found glitz and glitter, the capital of capital- ism. But Saturday in Chicago, Wale- sa found his people. He found the beaming, square- faced Polish-Americans who for years have suffered in spirit with Walesa and his countrymen, dis- cussing their homeland in the cof- fee shops and Roman Catholic churches of the largest Polish community in the world outside of Warsaw. Long before Solidarity cap- tured the imagination of the world, Chicago's Poles were sending food, clothes and money behind the Iron Curtain, WALESA in Chicago dreaming of the day when the leader of a non-communist Po- land would receive a hero's wel- come here and a key to their city. The dream came true Saturday at Daley Plaza, a day officially cast as Lech Walesa Solidarity Day in the state of Illinois. And don't think Walesa didn't under- stand the special significance of Chicago and its people on his brief American tour. "It is your hearts, and the hearts of your forefathers that can turn into a good heartbeat for he said through a Sec WALESA on Page 7 Polish Solidarity leader Lech Walesa responds to the applause o! the crowd including Gov. James R. Thompson behind him at Saturday's Daley Plaza rally. Daily Herald chapm r Area man shows his support for Lech BY ANNEBURRISGASIOR Da ly Herald Staff Writer Andy FijaMcowski of Streamwood left Poland in 1982, but he rallied Saturday for Lech Walesa. Andy Fijalkowski arrived at his Streamwood house at 11 p.m. Friday. Then, the burly Pole stayed up until 3 a.m. painting one word on a giant white bed sheet. With great splashes of red paint, Fijalkowski painted the one word he knew would be of ut- most importance Saturday: Soli- da rnosc. At a.m. Saturday, Fijal- kowski wearing a sheep skin coat, a Chicago Bears hat and a Lech Walesa button was in the middle of a crowd of people in Daley Plaza in Chicago, waving his flag and anticipating seeing the man who has changed the face of the Communist world. In sometimes uncertain Eng- lish, Fijalkowski, 37, recounted his own trip from Poland to a new home in the United States seven years ago, when Walesa's Solidarity movement was in its infancy. Now, Fijalkowski said, he speaks with friends in Poland and they tell him of the changes. They talk about freedom they have to do things they never did before. It has changed very much, and Fi- jalkowski said he might go back next year, but just for a visit. "I'm not sure I would go back there to live. I love Poland, but America is my second country and I love he said. "Lech Walesa is fantastic and football is Fijalkowski said. "Today I am here with Lech, tomorrow I will have the Bears." With his flag waving, Fijal- kowski waited patiently for more than two hours in the cold for Walesa to arrive. He made friends with other Poles, speak- ing happily in his native tongue about what a wonderful day it was. "We all know we are here be- cause we love Poland." When Walesa finally made it to the red, white and blue platform, Fijalkowski could just see him through the crush of people. Wav- ing his flag madly, Fijalkowski shouted "niech zyie" (good luck) to his hero As Walesa spoke, Fijalkowski was often ahead of much of the crowd, not having to wait for an interpreter to explain what Wale- sa had said "This is what I came to Fijalkowski said. "He said don't worry. Everything is going to be OK. The door is open now." Beatings stun Czech protesters From PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia Demonstrators demanding an end to Communist Party domination lit candles and placed flowers on blood- stained sidewalks Saturday where police had beaten protesters in the largest such rally in 20 years. Six theaters canceled shows Satur- day night as actors and students called for strikes to protest police brutality at Friday night's demon- stration, in which white-helmeted policemen clubbed hundreds of peaceful protesters. Tens of thousands of students marched for five hours to com- memorate student Jan Opletal, killed by Nazis 50 years ago. When demonstrators tried to reach central Wenceslas Square, police attacked them with tear gas, dogs and clubs. The human rights group Charter 77 likened the police crackdown to Nazi reprisals during World War II. Seventeen demonstrators and sev- en policemen were officially listed as injured, although official media failed to report any injuries suffered by demonstrators One report said a 20-year-old stu- dent was beaten to death during the demonstration. Leading human rights activist Petr Uhl said a paratrooper pulled a protester from the crowd marching through central Prague and a group of security force officers began hit- ting him with clubs. "When he fell to the ground they hit him in the face until he was no longer Uhl said The state news agency CTK quot- ed the Interior Ministry as saying that 143 people were taken to police stations. Nine were detained on criminal charges and 70 on mis- demeanor charges. Twenty-one peo- ple were fined. Alexander Dubcek, the Commu- nist leader of the "Prague Spring" reforms in 1968, was detained during the march and released after three hours, witnesses said. Observers estimated the size of the crowd at people It was the largest demonstration since Aug- ust 1969, when crowds gathered in Prague a year after a Soviet-led in- vasion crushed Dubcek's reforms. About people gathered on Wenceslas Square on Saturday after- noon and walked to Narodm Street, where the protesters were beaten the day before. On the bridge again Cars move across the Bay Bridge between Oakland and San Francisco for the first time since last month's earthquake rup- tured a section of the 8.5-mile structure. Six highway patrol cars and 13 bridge toll trucks led the first cars in a triumphant procession late Friday. Associated Press Photo Right-to-die ruling breeds confusion for patient's family BY DAN ROZEK and DAVE URBANEK Daily Herald Staff Writera Nothing has changed for Dorothy M. Longeway since the Illinois Su- preme Court ruled that food and wa- ter can be withheld from some ter- minally ill patients. Although she was the impetus for the precedent-setting court ruling Monday, the 76-year-old Naperville woman remains unconscious in a convalescent center with her fate still undecided. Her plight illustrates that while the high court broke new legal ground on right-to-die issues, it also raised as many new questions as it answered. And doctors, hospital ad- ministrators and lawyers are just beginning to grapple with the ques- tions raised by the court ruling. Much of the uncertainty focuses on the requirements the court said must be met before intravenously- supplied water and nutrients can be withdrawn from terminally ill pa- tients. The most controversial restriction ordered in the court's 4-2 decision may be the one requiring a court or- der before food and water tubes can be disconnected. That requirement apparently will force Longeway's relatives to return to the DuPage County Circuit Court to seek permis- sion to withdraw tubes supplying the nutrients and water that are keeping her alive. Advocates on both sides of the right-to-die issue are criticizing that limitation and others set by the high court. "The significance of the ruling is that very, very, very few people will be able to navigate the restrictions laid down by the said attor- ney Eugene Qarmsari, who repre- sented Longeway's daughter and fa- ther before the supreme court "I won't say it will be impossible, but it's nearly impossible Longeway's daughter, Bonnie Kemer, petitioned the court asking that food and nutrients supplied through tubes to Longeway be halted so she could die peacefully A series See RIGHT-TO-DIE on Page 4   

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