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Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: June 25, 1989 - Page 1

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Publication: Daily Herald

Location: Chicago, Illinois

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   Daily Herald (Newspaper) - June 25, 1989, Chicago, Illinois                               Cubs come up with only 3 hits in loss to Expos 3 PADDOCK PUBLICATIONS SiSn 1989 10 75 Cents Sunday WEATHER Steamy Sunday Mostly sunny skies are forecast for today with humid conditions and highs in the upper 80s. Warm and humid weather should continue through Mon- day with a chance of thunder- storms and highs from 85 to 90. INSIDE Sailor dies in training For the second tune in little more than a year a sailor has died in a training pool at the Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida Page 5 Mayor hides out St Louis Mayor Vincent Schoe- mehl Jr. and his family were hiding in a Satur- day because of an alleged threat on his life Page 3. Flag ruling under fire Two out of three Americans dis- agree with the court's decision that burning the U.S flag is a constitutionally protected right Page 3. USA WEEKEND The retired Reagans Ronald and Nancy Reagan's new address in Bel features neighbors who shred their garbage and keep to them- where a burger costs and door-to-door sales- men drive Mercedes. Get to know their new home in USA Weekend. OPEN HOUSE Gassy condo Sophistication is the word for the New York City condomini- um owned by a Barrington Hills couple and used for business and pleasure. Step into a room a view of the Big Apple in Section 4. SHOWCASE Striking up the band Classical music critic Bill Gowen says conductor Richard Kapp and his New York-based chamber orchestra are keeping the tradition of the town band alive with a special concert recording Section Page 3. INDEX Dtocovwy'6-l Open BUSINESS Cashing in on coating The giant roll of 6-foot-wide sheet metal fresh from the steel mills of northwest Indiana is unloaded from the semi-trailer to Material Sciences Corp.'s fa- cility in Elk Grove Village. In a few days' another semi-trailer will be reloaded with coils of sheet metal. Mate- rial Sciences' technology is coil coating applying the finish to sheet metal. Learn more about the local company and its stock value on the American Stock Exchange In Business. ElaCk OI1 horse racing retuins to Arlington t v J t In the Arlington Park Racetrack grandstand crumbled in Today's racing Arfii tgton International Racecourse reopens its doors as one of History of the track from its flre and the most beautiful thoroughbred racing palaces in the profiles on the trainers and jockeys. A family bids farewell to its hero Missing 19 years in Air Force pilot finally comes home BY DANROZEK Dally Herald SUf t Writer During the 19 years he was missing in relatives of Lt. Col. Robert J. Panek hoped and prayed that one day they would know his fate beyond all doubt. But when word came earlier this year that remains returned by the Vietnamese had been iden- tified as his family found that this knowledge brought little of the relief they once thought it would. always were looking for- ward to a day we'd have an an- and then the day came and we didn't want said his youngest Kevin 20. do feel better he's back. But with having him all your hope is The family's agonizing wait drew to a close Saturday with Panek's burial at St. Michael the Archangel Cemetery in Palatine. The military-style which featured a 21-gun salute and a fly-over by by U.S. Air Force officially brought to a close the consternation the family has felt since Panek's remains were officially identified. an Air Force electronic warfare shot down over North Vietnam in 1970. Al- though other pilots reported see- ing then eject from the stricken he never appeared in a prisoner-of-war camp nor did his name appear on POW rolls. In more than eight silent years after Panek theU.S Air Force declared him killed in action. But family mem- particularly tits three chil- dren who live in the Northwest continued to believe he might still be alive. It was always my my that he would be home in time to walk me down the aisle at my said Kristin Art rile Partek bids farewell to her son with a red roaa and hand-delhrerad kiss to his casket dui Ing a burial for Robert a pilot missing In Wetnarii lor 19 years. twraw pwm that her father's remains had been Identified. The identification shocked family who had hungered for some definitive word but did not e xpect ever learn for certain had hap- pened to Panek. 'f honestly thought he was said Kevin who bare- ly 8 months old when his father Was shot down. I never thought I'd know for convinced myself he was probably added Panek's Barbara now remarried and living in Schauroburg. thought I would die not In a U.S. Army laborato- ry identified a tody returned last See HERO on Page 8 RoliertJ. Panek Panek's daughter and old ast child. when she married this spi a portrait of her 'missing fat ier adorned the altar. While on tier Seitz learned Mourners offer memories Page 9 I Daughter a toddler when he went to war. Oil spills plague Gulf coasts Auoctated Press RI Ribbons of heating oil drifted at least 20 miles and washed onto Rhode Island shores Saturday from a tanker that grounded in one of three accidents that together spilled as much as 2 55 million gallons of oil And in the Delaware River near an Uruguayan oil tanker carrying IB million gallons of industrial heating oil ran aground Saturday and its crew re- ported the spill as gallons Todd a Coast Guard said there was no way to know exactly how much spilled be- cause a significant amount of oil may have sunk Officials said that the most populated city in does not get its drinking water from the Delaware River At another spill in the Houston Ship Channel at Galveston Tex- about gallons of heavy crude oil spilled from a barge dam- aged in a collision with a cargo ves- sel Friday. The Rhode Island accident spilled 1 million to 1.5 million gallons of authorities said. the accidents were the worst setback for the oil shipping in- dustry since nearly 11 million gal- lons of heavy crude oil gushed into Alaskan waters from the tanker Exxon causing the nation's worst oil spill. real said Rhode Is- land Gov. Edward who called out National Guardsmen and prison inmates to help with the cleanup. amounts to gross no question about Madigan's political finesse carried tax hike to brink BY DAVEURBANEK Dnily Herald Staff Writer Mtte Madlgan'a power la tested again. AMOOMKI SPRINGFIELD Legisla- lobbyists and others under the Capitol dome have been lin- ing up in recent de ys to purchase the latest state government fash- ion statement golf shirts with a distinctive logo. Offered by the staff of Demo- cratic House Spea tor Michael J. the green shirts parody Republican leaders who said re- cently that Madigan's 67 House supporters are nothing but ducklings all in a following him wherever he goes and doing whatever he says. the first person to order one of the shirts last month was Gov. James R. Thompson. Up until a crucial Friday night vote hi the the lobbyists and other's all have been this following Madigan's Iced on the major issue of rate- ing the state income tax. But Madigan's proposed two 18.4 percent Increase in ii- come tax rates fell three votes short of approval in the Senate during the late-night maneuvei ing. It appears the 'ducklings' are beginning to wander. The proposal would boost the personal Income tax rate from the current 3.5 percent to 2.9 percent and the corporate rate from the current 4 percent to 4.736 percent. The extra reve- estimated at See MADIGAN on Page 9 Fingers crossed on Sears' relocation Bv MARIBETH VANDERWEELE Dally Herald Sta I Writer____________________ Suburban bi isiness and community leaders were hopeful Saturday that Sears will sojn announce plans to move Its t mer- chandise division to Hoffman Es- further enhancing Uie region's burgeoning ec momic base would really complete the cycle of the new American said Thomas president of the Greater Woodfleld Convention and Visitors bureau. not urban. It's not suburl an. It's in Hoffman li states has emerged as the leading contender foi the divi- based in the 110-story Sears Tower in according to sources c ose to the relocation talks The sit is part of acres north of the Northwest Tollway at Route ju .t west of the Poplar Creek Music' Other local on short list of new merchandise division head- quarters uicli de a 200-acre site near O'Hare Airpc as well as cities hi North Caroli Georgia and Colorado. Sears utlves and state offi- cials have co iducted lengthy negoti- ations with t offman Estates village officials in t weeks the latest coming y. Legislation to create a tax-incenti district Ln Hoffman Estates is being formulated in ccording to an aide hi House er Michael Madigan's office. lelther nor Hoff- man officials would publicly comment or the behind-the-scenes maneuverinc Although the North- west suburb in site has the inside track for Sears details of the pacnge must still fall hi sourc3s say. An announce- ment could jome next week. If Sears c oes make the it would becoir e part of a growing cor- ridor of corf orate giants such as All- state Insura ice a Sears subsidi- and Mi torola Inc. in Schanra- local It aders say. just 1 ope everything will pan out the way we want it to. I'm rea- sonably sun it Hoffman Es- tates Village Trustee Bruce C. Llnd said. have the property. We have the f ac lities I think it will be a perfect man cai settle in there for the next 50 yeai s and not be concerned about not faing attractive to em- Rivera said. schools alone are or a of the greatest pluses. Even som traditional enemies of growth and levelopment in the sub- urbs are enc ouraged about the pros- pect of havir g Sears as a neighbor. it s better for us to work with a resp and Sears is certainly t single owner than a serie of smaller said Donald Klei executive director of the Barringt m Area Council of Gov- ernments. We certainly wouldn't want to set a 30-story tower We would like t see a corporate cam- pus with grc it great ar- If there is. a negative to the hoped- for It a traffic But with I le state worldng out big tax incentiv ss for the retail road improvements wouldn't be far Chinese communists fire moderate leader Ail Prcsi BEIJING China's Communist Party fired its moderate Zh.io on Saturday and re- pieced him with a Shanghai party boss who moved swiftly to quell pro- democracy protests in his city. The new general secretary of the 47-milhon-member party Is Jiang a university-educated technocrat who has served as mayor and party secretary of China's largest city. The first three executions follow- ing the crackdown on the pro-democ- racy movement occurred in Shang- hai. The party also purged Hu who shared the 69-year-old Zhao's sympathy for the student-led move- ment for a freer society and served with bun on the Politburo Standing the nation's highest- ranking political body. Zhao's status had been in limbo for more than a month He was last seen in public when he met with student whose 7-week-old move- ment was crushed in a crackdown that began June 3. The party's 276-member Central Committee also removed Zhao from the 17-member ruling Politburo and its Standing from the 175-member policy-making Central and from the Central Military Commission. He apparently was allowed to keep his party membership. A party released by the official Xinhua News said at a critical juncture in- volving the destiny of the party and the comrade Zhao Ziyang made the mistake of supporting the turmoils and splitting the and he had unsurkable resjoonsibillties for the shapi ig-up of the The said it will maintain ita policies of r ifonn and greater open- ness with t rest of the world. It also pledgee to work for greater de- mocracy ard an end to the main cemands of the student protesters. The repo t on Zhao's ouster was read by hu. Premier U who joined senior leader Deng Xiaoping to consolidate the power of hard-liners Jetermlned A crush the pro-democr icy movement.   

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