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Chicago Austin News Newspaper Archive: April 3, 1968 - Page 1

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   Austin News, The (Newspaper) - April 3, 1968, Chicago, Illinois                                Irene Does am Announcement by President Johnson that he would not seek or accept the Democratic nomi- nation for re-election stunned the nation. Bui 11 didn't come as a snock to Chicago's noted psychic, Irene F. Hughes, or to Commu- nity Publications readers of hei weekly col- umn, Irene..." In her column of March 20, 1968, Mrs. Hughes wrote, "It is my psychic impression I have stated a number of Mr. Johnson will soon announce that he will not run for re-election." Not only did Irene predict he would not be a candidate for the office but she pinpointed that the fact that he, himself, would make the announcement "soon." The announcement that came as a bombshell to Americans, with the exception of those close to the President, came Sunday night, less than two weeks after the prediction was published in Community Publications newspapers Almost as surprising, in his 40-mmute televi- sion and radio report to the nation, was his announcement of a halt in U. S. bombing of most of North Vietnam Here, again, Mrs. Hughes proved her powers of extrasensory perception when predic'ed in her column of Jan. "It is my prediction that President Lyndon B. Johnson will make a dramatic and amazing statement concerning the Viet Nam war in late April or early May. "It win center around an all-out effort for peace and his views will seem to have changed concerning the war in that area." President Johnson's dramatic statement of the immediate halt in the bombing, broadcast Sunday came several weeks earlier than the date stated by the prediction was one of amazing accuracy, just as was the prediction that Mr. Johnson would announce "he will not run for re-election." Mrs. Hughes was asked in a telephone inter- view Monday morning, to comment on the presidential race, now thrown into chaos by Mr. Johnson's decision not to run. She said, "Another Democratic candidate will come out the end of April and will be strongly the picture." Did she think that Vice President Hubert H. be a candidate "I feel that Mr. Humphrey will say 'no' to being slated as a was Mrs. Hughes1 answer. President Johnson's visit to Chicago Monday, on the heels of his Sunday announcement, may have been to discuss with Mayor Richard Dal- ey the possibility of moving the Democratic convention to a place other than Chicago, said Irene. Should the convention site be changed it would be to a city or town further north. Chicago poses many problems as the conven- tion city, she said, "This will be the most unusual presidential election since Lincoln's I have said many times before. The election could be thrown into the House of Representatives. still am convinced that a Re- publican will be concluded the fa- mous psychic. THE AUSTIN NEWS VOL. 29 NO. 4 4906 W. CHICAGO WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1968 This Issue Consists of Two Pages First Day Out fishing season opened Monday and Mike Ho- boxes and spinning rods, stocking up on [ito, 15, 5008 Augusta, Mike Optie, 16, 1000 N. worms and hiking to Columbus Park. Boys avergne, and Ronald Stark, 15, 1021 N. Le- report they caught ten fish, but didn't say if laire, lose no time in breaking out tackle all were keepers. Willing Willie Chicago's Oldest Neighborhood Answer Man fter 20 years, Willing Willie, the first regular feature my Chicago devoted to answering ques- s and solving complaints of readers, moves to the oit page. Reacters are invited to send questions and c problems thk need to be tackled to Willing Willie, imunity Publications, 4906 W. Chicago ave., Chica- 111. 60651. hin a space of five minutes last Thursday Willie received olephone calls vlicing the same complaint. Seems a car at North and') Mason is causing a First caller said she was driving east on North. jig may not be the right word. Creeping is more like said. took me 22 minutes to go just a few blocks. At first I night there was an accident up ahead, but when we got to tson I discovered the cause. The cars were turning into son and then to an alley that led to the car wash. Also it s impossible to park (even where there are meters) because se cars headed for the wash were hugging the curb." ,econd caller said she saw a man almost get crushed ween two cars he attempted to cross the street. The line was stopped, waiting to inch forward toward the wash the man stepped between two cars. Suddenly, the line rted to move again. "This is really a dangerous situation." Willie put a call in to Sgt. Arthur Ferando, Austin district immunity services officer. The ever helpful sergeant re- Wed that similar beefs regarding the car wash had been fie at the station. "We've got traffic control working on Sgt. Ferando said, "and should have the problem jghtened out real soon." in't there something that can be done about the teenager. constantly hang around in front of our house. The profane liguage is awful and some of the kids have gone so far as to nasty words on the white sidng on our from asking the kids politely to leave, the best of action for yon is to call PO 5-1313. An area police 'icer told Willie "we can't impress on people enough that a fl to this number is best thing they can do. Our job is not ily crime prevention and i Jtection, but also the protection people. If the situation is bad enough and merits it, D. L. ,n be assured that a patrol will be placed on that area 'most around the clock." know the Mayor's Commission on Human Relations is open usual hours, five days a week. But what about an eme-- ,icy that might arise on the weekends, holidays or at night? there any place we can get help during non-working [l. T. 'rhe commission informs us they have a "hot-line" which is f operation seven days a week, 24 hours a day. The number f i 744-4111. A commission spokesman said that "in normal hours, experts are available at 744-4111 to advise and I on complaints charging a denial of equal rights in matters housing, employment, schools and hospitals and civil f My husband will be retiring soon and we are considering vfng an old farmhouse we plan to repair and remodel rselves. But what's bugging me (excuse the pun) is how can be sure the house is not termite infected' Npifher of us Id recognize a termite if we saw P. R. L irst, have the house inspected by a dependable extermi- latiiig company, advises Stanley Rachesky, entomologist bug expert) of the United of Illinois cooperative extension ervice, 10 N. Lasalle, 663-2620. Check to see that the yon choose is a member of the Illinois Pest tontrol association. Members of IPCA are established firms adequate financial responsibility and use the lastest ihemicals and techniques. If the house has termites, control If the pests must be done by a qualified exterminator as use chemical requires special knowledge and equipment. e to keep up with what's going on in my neighborhood, llie will you please satisfy my curiosity about why the .ng next door to the Leamington Market, Chicago and iington, was torn down? Is a new building going up or Jhe lot be used as a parking L. called Gus Casaccio, owner of Leamington Market, liho said the building at 5121 Chicago, containing a store and [at above, was wrecked to make room for a new addition to tie Market. This will enable Leamington to expand the store o provide better service, said Gus, and to greatly enlarge its lakery and frozen food departments. To Discuss Top School Problems Parents will assemble at La- Follette park fieldhouse, 1331 N. Laramie, on April 10 to learn how they can help with the No. 1 educational problem of Chicago school general lag in reading achieve- ment. "The school system has giv- en us fantastic cooperation in planning this said Mrs. Louis Pardo, 4833 Crystal, its co-chairman! with Mrs. Nathan- iel Olieff, 3623 Plournoy. Dr. George Connelly, area associate superintendent, will welcome parents at a.m., and many-school ex- perts are taking part in the program. The conference was initiated by Distiict 23 of the PTA, which includes 95 Chicago schools in the area between Roosevelt and Addison, and between Ashland and the west- ern city limits. It is open to all interested persons. Participants are asked to bring a sandwich for lunch and they wiH be served coffee. Austin District Police Crack Policy Ring Austin district vice officers have broken up a policy ring which they believe netted its operators as much as a week. Officer Frank Bychowski, district vice coordinator, said the two suspects, Jesse and Doris Greene of 4678 West End, ere "taking better than per day in bets." The two were arrested last Wednesday night by vice of- ficers flenneth DePaola, Frank Nanni, Japes Gartner and Charles Ekenborg fol- lowing a week-long surveil- lance of tLj husband-wife team. 1 Confiscated during a search of the Greene's second floor apartment were policy slips, a press, plates ailQ receipts. In addition, x 'packet of marijua- na was discovered in the Greene automobile. Greene has been charged with possession of marijuana and gambling while Mrs. Greene was booked for gam- bling. They are to appear in Branch 57 on April 17. The vice officers' surveil- lance of the suspects began to come to a climax about 3 p.m. Wednesday went an informant told Gartner and Ekenborg that Greene and his wife were at the West End address and League Expands, Signs Up Players The Northwest Babe Ruth boys' baseball league has ex- panded its territory west from Cicero to Narragansett, league president Casey Karas an- nounced last week. The east- ern boundary remains at Cali- fornia. Boys aged 13 through 15 who live in that area north of Chi- cago and south of Fullerton are eligible to join teams now being formed in the league. Play is scheduled to start May 6. Interested boys should regis- ter at p.m. tommorrow (Thursday) at Mozart Park, 3840 Armitage. In addition to a parent or guardian, each should take with him a copy of his birth certificate and util- apparently "in business." The officers were also told Greene was driving a red, 1961 Chev- rolet and supplied police with the license number. Gart er and Ekenborg spotted the car parked in front of 151 N. Kilpatrick and immediately set up a "stake Gartner and Ekenborg stationed t h e m- selves at the southeast cor- ner of Kilpatrick and West End while DePaola and Nanni took positions at the west corner of Kilpatrick and May- pole. The officers kept constant "watch-on the West End house and the car from 3 to approxi- mately p.m. During that time, they saw at least three men, on separate occasions, enter and leave the Greene apartment after staying only three to five minuras. At a man and woman left by the rear door of the flat and got into the parked car. They apparently spotted the police stake out and at- tempted to flee but were stopped before they had gone more than half a block. Officers searched the car and found a tinfoil packet, be- lieved to be marijuana, under the driver's seat. The Greenes were informed of their consti- tutional rights, police said, and were then asked if officers could search the apartment. Greene is said to have replied: "No one searches my place jwithout a search warrant." The suspects were taken to 15th district headquarters, 5327 Chicago, where a search war- rant was drawn up. After the warrant was taken to Judge Launen Genese and signed, of- ficers and the Greenes re- ity bill as proof of residence. TALK ON NARCOTICS Officer Anthony Rigoni turned to the suspects' flat where the policy making equipment was found. Austin Cmdr. Mark Thansour- of i as, in praising the work of the the Chicago Police department vice officers, said "This was will give a talk on narcotics at' a nice piece of police work, the meeting of the Nprth-Cice-, Nothing fancy or ro Community organization at i just good, hard nosed digging 8 p.m. today (Wednesday) at I and almost around the clock National hall, 1645 N. Cicero. surveillance." Start New Addition Officials of Midwest Audio Corp., 5707 Division, join to break ground for new square foot addition to plant. Company is leading producer of audio products for the transportation industry. Recent development contracts include sound and communications systems for United aircraft's 165 mile an hour turbo train. Above, from left, are Richard Muesler, chief engineer; Frank Salerno, manager of manufacturing; E.H. Taylor, firm's president, and William Richrath, sales engineer for Midwest Electronic Sales, an associated compa- ny. Tell War On 'Panic Peddlers' A public meeting to explain the accomplishments of the Organization for a Better Aus- tin's Real Estate Practices committee in their efforts to rid Austin of panic peddling real estate dealers, was held Friday at Resurrection Hall. Leonard Miska, a member of the Chicago Commission on Human Relations, and Don Hartigan, staff assistant for the Commission, were guest Miska gave the group en- couragement m their fight to stabilize Austin and wpinted out the success that had been achieved in potting Je- rome Healy out of the real estate business in Austin. Hartigan explained that "sold by" or similiar signs art illegal and may not be erected in residential areas. He thanked the O B A for their interest in submitting a list of the illegal "sold" signs in Austin. He asked the people ta report any building in a residential area displaying a "sold" sign. The report can be made by telephone to the com- plaint desk of the zoning sec- tion of the Building Depart- ment Says Area Croups Backing Dual Expressway Proposal Charles A. Snyder, president of the West Metropolitan Area Council Inc. last week said Austin Police Crack Policy Ring that many Wes'.-Northwest Side organizations have ex- pressed approval of the coun- cil's plans for the Crosstown Expressway. Snyder told Community Pub- lications that he has been in close contact with leaders of the Organization of Northwest Communities and the Organi- zation for a Better Austin and "They are greatly interested in council's proposed dual highway." The council's plan envi- sions a sonth bound highway west of the Belt Line tracks with the north bound route east of the railroad. Lying between the two express- ways would be industrial parks, shopping centers and residential areas. Snyder said there are many dual ceeds the city's proposed ex- pressway designs fay four lanes and removes frictions between trucks and other vehicles in that it separates truck and passenger car traffic in the mainstem. The council plan, he clared, also provides for ex- pansion of two lanes in each route and is set up so that emergencies could be easily handled. j Each roadway, according to i the council proposal, could provide five lanes during con- struction work, repairs or ma- jor accidents which block traf- fie. Synder also said that the dual highway would mean less uprooting of present communi- ties. The council claims its plan "aids unscrambling of land us- plus values" of the channel expressway, "The council views the corri-! serve sound residential and in- Snyder went on, "as a, dustrial areas and to increase ages which would tend to pre- sort of sub-city strip of eco- nomic activities: work places, rest places (recreation and sleeping) and service areas centers and other commercial activities and edu- cational school and higher levels) and con- their values; discourages through traffic over east-west neighborhood interior streets; encourages private develop- ment of industrial parks and more than doubles the amount of real estate which could be included in the industrial park Equipment police suspect was used in policy wheel which netted operators a week is stacked on table at Austin police headquarters following arrest of Jesse and Doris Greene, 4678 West End, on gambling charges. At lower left is type used for policy slips which were printed on paper shown in middle of table. Bottles contain hik and flips in center foreground are receipts from previous day's "take." At right, is portable hand press used to print slips. nected by etficient mass trans- j segments of the corridor devel- it and safe roadways which opment." would make it an urban area It was also said that the with superior circulation." council's proposal would cost Snyder also pointed out that i "little, if any, more" than dual channel highway city's estimated 1 I   

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