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Centralia Sentinel: Thursday, August 24, 1865 - Page 1

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   Centralia Sentinel (Newspaper) - August 24, 1865, Centralia, Illinois                               CENTEALIA SENTINEL PUBUSHSD JSVBKr TBCfiSDAV BV J. W. C. D, FLETCHER CEJSXKAUA, MARION Co., ILL. TI3RMS. Subscription, is If not paid Trithiu 6 mouths, will bo Ten cents per quarter, extra, fur papers dcliverc by tho Carrier, to city HATES 01' ADVERTISED. 1 MO. 2 MO. 3 MO. 6 MO. 12 MO S7.50 SJOJI? I 6.01) 7.50 lO.Oil'l" 15.0 Throe squares, Four I 1P.OD 2MI Fourth j Itftt 20.00 30.01 HaJf i One 80.00 I 50.00 One square, one 'Oaa inch, or 10 lines vi w'ioioa make a square, S5 cent additional will he chanrcd for Business No- Xoticts ia local colama 20 cents a line. BUSINESS CARDS. and A. M. ecular communications  and exceeding niacli oftbo oil treacled forth. And I am oilso. To find so much grease, both well agrcase with me. I skirmished from garret to upon the oil TegioK. Ever siuce I became born, my poverty has been hard to Le borne. I have havopeen bored by cred- itors. My credit was run into the ground People thought ine'rich meanwhile, and a very mean while it was, too. They thought I had plenty of money, so thoy wanted pay down for what "i bought. Not wishing to humor peopla, albeit some- tbiog of a humorist, perhaps I will not purchase mauj thiogs. I leased, I bored, I bought it. Veni, vidi, vici. Oil-i. He-i Greasc-i. Oils well that ends well. I bored, aud it camo. I drilled a holo through a rock, and have already beca re- vrarded with so.much of the fuel being pre- pared for the final conflagration, that I fear the last boil will end in as great a fizzle as did tho Dutcb Gap Canal. And now I am rich than any maa or any other. I have lots of money now, when I have no use for it. What a queer world. Nothing like oil. Folks say, "Hallo, here's Honorable Mr. made a camo to STARTLING. Tbs facetious Local of tho Monteauma epKttican gels off a gloriously goSi thing as follows Iha other "hjlj we lay musing, and our weary brain eon- fusing over tho topics of the day, suddenly heard'a rattling, as of serried hosts' as they mingled io the fray. What's we cried, upstarting, and into (he darkness dartiag, slap! wo rail against the door- Ob, 'tis grumbled, as o'er a hug'o arm uuijjprur u ur a nugo arm law chat, to every stranger whojcllair wo a bug, and hia court a fried fish should bo more. said we, our anger served. The servants were directed to (for wo thought it so surprising just struck aforturie. Deuced fine fellow, Mr. Brick." Thres months sinco to It's all was plain 'etroleum. And now for a splurge. Brown-stono louse on fifth avenue, wife brown sfoae roat, designed by old Brown himself, on both ends of it. Bed horses with green ails, pink eyebrows, blue eyes, ciiocoiato colored ears, frizzleu roano and matchless tyie. Velioiv wagon with black sides, purple blinds with brovfn top, a la clad shoJl. Ethiopian driver, wiiito kidi, sol- fcreno stockings, magaetia hatband, and false teeth on gutta. purcha base. And a sixty four etbiopiano with brogatelle draw- ers, that modesty may not be shocked by looking at tbo legs thereof. A nd a libi-a- notice if, when tho stranger bad cateu the fish to the bone ou one wJe, La turned it over and began on the other side. If ha did, ho was to be immediately seized and on the third day '.hereafter he was to be put to death. But by a great stretch of imperial clemency, the culprit was permitted to utter one wish each day, which tha emperor pledged himte'.f lo granV provided it was uot to sparo his life- Many had ahcady perished in con- sequence of this etiisl, when, ono a count and his young son presented them- selves at court. Tho fish wns served as usual, and when the count had removed all the fish from ono side, he turued over, aud was about, to commence on the other, when he waa suddenly seized and ibrown iato prison, aud was told uf his approaching doom. Sorrow-Btrickon, tho count's young son besought the Emperor lo allow him to die in the room of his fa- ther a favor which the monarch was pleased to accord him. The count was ac- cordingly rcleated from prison, and his eoii was thrown iuto his cell in his stead. As ;oou as this had been done, the young man ;aid to his gaolers You. know I have ;ho right to make three demands before I din go and tell tho Emperor to send 1110 (his daughter and a priest to marry us." Tbe first demand was not much to tho Emperor's; taste, nevertheless ho bound to keep his word, aud therefore complied with tho request, to which tho princess had no kind of objection. This oijurred tho times when kings kept treasure? in that a bug should thus do you think a small insect, sir, thus would all the -refect, sir No, 'tis not a bug, Nt my friend." Now becoming sorely 'tightened, round our waist' our pants were tightened, and put on our coat and into tho darkness peering, we saw, with trembling and muoh fearing, tho glaring" eyes of THOMAS CAT, Esq'. With astonishment and vroncer we, gazed upon this son of thunder, as he sat upon the floor. Now clear wa hoarsely shouted, as o'er head our boot we flouted, Tako your presence from my floor." Then with -air aad mien majestic, this dear creature, called domestic, made his exit thiough tho door. Made his exit without growling, neither was hia -voice heard howling, not a single word ho said. And with much elated to esoapa doom so fated, elovrlr we went back to iti PRECIOUSNE8S OF LII'TLENESS. Every thing is beautiful, says B. F. Taylor, of (.ho Chicago Journal, when it is littlo, except souls; little pigs, littlo lambs, little birds, littlo little cbildien. Lialo martin-boxes of homes are gener- ally the most happy and cozy. Little villages are nearer to being atoms of a shattered paradisa than we know of. Lit- tlo fortunes bring the most content, and itdt! hopes the least disappointment. Little words are tho sweetest to hear, and little charities fly farthest, aud staj Jongcst on the wing. Littlo lakes are tho a cave, or iu a tower set apart for the pur- on lakes pose, and  iggers to wait oa me, that oil I'll have to do, will be to be happy. Oh Pute. Let mo kiss you fur your Ala. And I'll lay a bed mornings, aad sit up nights, and bore my friends oi day, till they cant bare'l it. Talk abou apncst industry, sawing wood for tho du.it opening oysters for the Bhells, blackening Doots merely to see your face in and being honest forty years waiting'for some rich wan to adopt you. Playucl Petroleum is tho boy. And now I'll live ligh. Out of ay house vain pomp. w nutr iUCi UA.UUUU- 1 ingly uncomfortable. Unable to sleep, he I vidi, rtii-n _ _. i -ftl' Away from tbe cold cuts, crackers, cheese, mush boiled, Iro. 5 mackerel, warmed up soup, aud brilliant appetites- I've struck Peto GLASS may even be turned in a lathe. Strange as it seems this is literally true. f o special tools even are needed any am- teur turner who has operated on either f the mctale may chuck a piece of glass n his lathe, and turn it with the same ools, and in tbe same way, as he would a icce of steel, only taking care to keep ho chips from his eyes. This strange iscovery made, almost accidentally, n the early part of 1860, by one of our lost celebrated mechanical engineers, and light have been patented, but the inventor ontcnted himself with simply putting it n record, and generously presented it to ic nation. The consequence was, that no ne cared or thought about it, and the ca has been suffered to.lie nearly barren, lough capable of being turned to great ccount. Let any amateur mechanic ako tho experiment, aud he will be sur- rised at the ease with which this scem- giy intractabls material may bo out and ashioned according to his will. [Chambers'. Journal. A scaad discretion is not so much in- tented by never making a'mistake as by never repeating one. What is good for determining a. man's weight Tbe balance nt his banker's. rose early on the third morning and went. feais in hislieart, to tho prison to hear what tic third wish was to be. said he to tka prisoner, tell mo what your third demand is, that it ror.y bo granted at oaee, and you bung out of hand, for I am tired of your demands." answered the prisoner, "I have but one nicire favoi to ask of your maj- esty, which, when you have granted I sbail dio cooteut. It is merely that you will cause the eyes of those who saw my father turn the fish over to bo put out." "Very replied tbe Emperor, your demand is but natural, and springs from a good heart. Let the chamberlain ba ho continued, turning to his juards. "I, sir cried tbe chamberlain did not see was the steward." Let the steward be seized, said the- king. But tbe steward protested with tears in eyes that he had not witnessed anything of what had been reported, and said it was the butler. The butler declared he had seen nothing of the matter, and that it must havo been one of the valets. Sut thoy protested that they were utterly gnorant of what had been charged igaiust the count; in short, it turned out farms the best tilled. Liftle books tha most read, and little songs tha dearest ioved. And when Nature would maka any thing especially ruro aud beautiful, she mates it pearls, little diamonds, littla dews. Agur's is a model prayer, but then it is a littlo prayer, and the burden of tha pe- tition is for little. Tho Sermon on tha McLni. is littlo, but tho last dedication discourse was an hour. Tha Roman said, -I quere-J But dispatches, now-a-days, aie longer than tho battles they toll of. Every-body calls that littlo they love best on earth. We once heard a good sort of mm speak of his little wife, and wo fan- cied she must La a perfect bijou of a wife. vVo saw her, she weighed 210 wo 'were surprised. But then it was no man meant it. Ke could put his wife in his heart and have loom for other tbicgg bciitJua and what was sho but precious, and what was sho but little We rather doubt tho stories of great of gold we sometimes bear of, be- cause Nature deals in httles, almost alto- gether- Life is mado up of little, death, is what remains of them all; day is mado up of littlo beams, and night is glorious with little stars. Multum in in a tho great beauty of all that wo Jove best, hope for most, and remember longest. THE LABGH OP woman has no natural gift more bewitching than a sweet laugh. It is lika tho sound of flutes on the water. It flows from her in clear, sparkling rill; acd tbe hoart that hears it feels as if bathed in tha cool, ax- bileratiDg spring. Have you ever pur- sued an unseen fugitive through trees, lad that nobody .could be found who had seen on by a now llero' now the count commit the offence, upon which tbe princess said I appeal to you, my father, as to an- other Solomon. If nobody saw tbe offence committed tho count cannot be guilty, and my husband is innocent." Tbe Emperor frowned, and forthwith ho courtiers began to'murmur and then he smiled and immediately their visages became radiant. "Let it be said hia majesty let him live, though I havo put many a ajan to death for a lighter offence than his. But if he is not hung, ho is married. Justice has been dons.' now lost, now found? We hava. And wo are pursuing that wandering voice to this day. Sometimes it cornea to us in the midst of onr care aad sorrow, or iri- some business; and then wo may away and listen, and hear it ringing through the room like a silver bell, with. power to scare away tho evil spirit of tha mind. much we owe to that sweet laugh! It turns ths prose to poetry; it flings flowers of sunshine over the dark- ness of the wood in which vfe are travel- ing; it touches with light, even our sleep, which is no more the imago of death, but is consumed with dreams that aro tie [Dickens' Once a Week. immortality A coquette is a female archer, who first bags and then backs her game. Where the lawyers flourish, W4 Ulte it for grunted tie laws do not. lEWSPAPERr NEWSPAPER   

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