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Southern Illinoisan Newspaper Archive: December 24, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Southern Illinoisan

Location: Carbondale, Illinois

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   Southern Illinoisan (Newspaper) - December 24, 1974, Carbondale, Illinois                                PUBLICATION OFPICE Murphyiboro 710 N Illlnoli 3 Walnut 212 N 1Mb Volumt i Copy Southern Ulinoisan tuceHMrtoCirbonMteVrw Hirrln Joinnil Murphyjboro 1 010175 sESSPAPERSi BOX 739 IW 62525 US Steel reduces increase t onoota cfoahle tax CUt Washington AP The Ford administration has obtained a partial rollback of U S Steels recent price rise and now is questioning an in crease by the No 2 steel com pany U S Steel Corp responding to President Fords criticism of the price increase as inflation ary on Monday trimmed the rise by about 20 per cent U S Steel last week had said it was boosting prices 47 per cent but the industry leader said Mon day it would reduce the price hike to around 4 per cent However a U S Steel spokesman acknowledged late Monday night Uiat 4 per cent refers to the companys total product line not just the two Hike partially rolled back No 2 firms increase probed thirds affected by hikes Thus the increase on two thirds of U S Steels product line remains at between 7 and 8 per cent Before the cutback they were estimated to average about 8 per cent with hikes on some products as high as 11 per cent Shortly before U S Steels announcement its biggest competitor Bethlehem Steel Corp said it was raising its prices about 2 per cent to bring them in line with die competition Later WheelingPittsburgh Steel Corp the ninth largest said it was hiking prices 55 per cent on about onesixth of its productive After U S Steels announce ment Ford said in Vail Colo I am pleased with the work that was done bythe Council on Wage and Price Stability and the attitude of U S Steel In making this rollback Domestic activities CIA overseer resigns after spying revealed The Christmas Story Israeli troops guard Bethlehem on Christmas Eve BethelehemOccupied Jordan AP Church beljs prayers and light security marked Christ mas Eve today in the birth place of Christ as Israeli troops checkedveverx person entering the town inan effort to prevent Arab The army put up roadblocks on every route intp hilltop Bethleheman3 from am today until 5 am Christmas morning was admitting only pilgrims and tourists carrying passes from the Israeli gov ernment Armed soldiers patrolled outsiile the Church of the Na tivity builtbythe Crusaders on the sitewhich tradition says was the location of the manger in whiehJesus was born A dozenbrightcolored search booths some covered with plastic shower curtains stood nearby JD the garden of the Palace Hotel for worshipers at the annual midnight mass to be checked for guns or explo sives The Arab mayor of Bethle hem and local Arab merchants complained that the security precautions reduced the num ber of tourists and were not necessary Security has been tight every Christmas since Israel cap tured Arab Bethlehem from Jordan in the 1967 it was intensified this year after a grenade attack Sunday in East Jerusalem wounded a girl in a party of Florida Baptists and a warning from the Palestine Liberation Organization that more tourists might be attack ed Three Arab armies were on the alerttoday to repellsraeli attacks as Moslems began celebrating their holiest days of the year Al Adha the fourday Feast of the Sacrifice ending the Is lamic pilgrimage to Mecca coincided with the Christmas celebration west of the Jordan River in Bethlehem Israeli troops put an unusually tight security net around thetown where Christ was bom in an attempt to prevent attacks by Palestinian terrorists Meanwhile Israeli jets flew over south Lebanon and broke the sound barrier over Beirut Lebanese Premier Ras hid Solh put the armed forces and other security units on the alert to repel invaders But antiaircraft gunners around Beirut did not shoot at the Israeli jets highoverhead New York Times News Service And Associated Press Washington James Angleton named in published reports as overseer of alleged illegal domestic spying by the CIA today told the Associated Press he has resigned as head of the agen cys counterintelligence op erations Angletons resignation be came known after President Ford ordered William E Colby director of the Central Intelli gence Agency to report within a matter of days on the published allegations Fords call for an investi gation announced to newsmen by White House Press Sec retary Ron Nessen at Vail Colo where the President is on a skiwork vacation came on a day of heightened congres sional concern and protest over the spying initially reported fndex Classified Comics TV Bridge Crossword Editorials Family living Records Sports Weather details map Youth 27 45 67 1514 26 Tonight cloudy with occa sional rain or possibly rain and snow mixed low in the upper 20s or lower 30s Wednesday cloudy and colder with a chance of rain high in the upper 30s Thursday possibly some rain or snow Sunday in the New York Times The chairmen of three major committees announced that they would begin extensive hearings into the CIA soon after the new Congress con venes next month Nessen told newsmen that the President had ordered Colby to submit his report through the National Security Council headed by Secretary of State Henry A Kissinger The purpose is to find out exactly what did happen the press aide said Asked about the future of Richard Helms the former CIA director whose dismissal as ambassador to Iran has been urged by at least one senator Nessen cautioned newsmen to put in perspective what we have here We have a newspaper ac count of past activities of the CIA he said Thats all we haye We need to avoid hard ening theseaetivities into fact Pending this Colbys report it seems to make this kind of judgment premature In its Sunday dispatch the Times quoting wellplaced government sources reported that the CIA had violated its charter by mounting a massive intelligence operation during the Nixon administration against members of the anti war movement and other dis sident groups in the United States Intelligence files on at least 10000 American citizens were compiled the Times quoted its sources a s saying 3800 workers to negotiate early in 75 By Gary Sosniecki Of The Southern Hlinoisan More than 3800 Southern Il linois labor Union members will face contract negotiations dur ing the first six months of 1975 Although most unions will not begin negotiations until several months into the new year labor leaders are hoping that settle ments will be quick Im trying tobe optimistic said Wayne Duckworth busi ness manager of the Interna tional Union of Operating Engi neers Local 148 of Maryville Well do our best to work our problems out on the bar gaining table About 300 members of Local 148 struck the Hudsonville Cof feen and Grand Tower power stationsof the Central Illinois Public Service Co for more than a month in 1973 The two year contract that ended the strike only the second in the companys more than 60 year history expires June 30 Duckworth said negotiations probably will begin 60 days beforethe contract expires Another CIPS contract affect ing about 900 members of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 702 expires the same day J Harvey Fryer Local 702 business manager said about 30 classifications of workers including linemen servicemen and meter readers will be af fected in all three CIPS divi sions There are about 240 electrical workers in the Southern Divi sion which covers an area ex tending nearly to Mt Vernon on the north Mounds on the south Golconda for gas serv ice on the east and Grand Tower on the west Fryer said the electrical workers have never struck CIPS although the current two year contract wasnt ratified until 12 days after the prior oneyear pact expired Also on June 30 the electri cal workers contracts with Several area unions contracts to expire during first six months four Rural Electrification Ad ministration cooperatives ex pire tjiey include the Egyptian Electric Coopera tive of Steeleville the Southern Illinois Power Cooperative of Marion the Southeastern Illi nois Electric Cooperative of El dorado and the Southern Illi nois Electric Cooperative of Dongola About 150 workers are Fryer said negotiations for the CIPS and cooperative con tracts will begin 60 days prior to expiration and that no problems are expected But he Its a long way until June 30 One electrical workers con tract still is not settled from last June 30 Fryer said The contract which affects between Three major strikes settled meatplant dispute continues On the Southern Illinois labor acene three major strikes were settled and a fourth continues Aboutr7300 United Mine Wor kers Jn the area settled their strike whichbeganNov 12 just In time for Christmas Mine construction workers negotiat ing a separate contract picket ed and keptminers off the Job until Jec 23 even though the miners approved theircon tract Dec 5 Southern Illinois largest in dustrial employer Norge Co of Herrin ended a 57day strike Dec ll Not all of the 1640 employes were called back to work because of slumps in the sales of washers and dryers General Telephone Co em ployes voted Nov 20 to end J a 26day strike against the com pany Supervisory personnel maintained phone service dur ing the strike The 250 employes of the Du Quoin Packing Co have been on strike since March 10 The company has continued to pro duce a limited supply of Blue Bell products with supervisory and newly hired personnel 175 and 200 employes of the Illinois Power Co in Randolph and Perry counties is now in arbitration Officials of the Retail Clerks Union still are negotiating a wage reopener thatwas due Nov 17 for the last year of one twoyear contract Vernon Neckermann presi dent of Local 896 in Marion says about 500 clerks at in dependent and chain grocery stores in Marion Harrisburg Carboridale West Frankfort Mt Vernon Chester and Cen tralia are affected Neckermann said negotia tions began in early Novem ber Although a final proposal has been received from the employers it must be explain ed to and approved by each of 10 locals in AreaOne before it will go into effect He said the entire process could take several more weeks The top rate on the contract currently an hour for a clerk with two years on the job He declined to say how much of an increase had been offered but said fte union hop ed to bring wages more iir line with the St Louis area rate of an hour Neckermann added that Lo cal 896 has 32 contracts com ing up with Marion businesses later in 1975 One of the larger contracts coming up in early 1975 is the Egyptian District Council of Carpenters pact with the Egyp tian Contractors Association the Southern Illinois Builders Association and Associated General Contractors of Illinois Arthur Vincent business rep resentative of the district coun cil says a threeyear contract on working conditions and a oneyear salary pact expire March 31 The current wage agreement is for per hour About 800 carpenters from the entire ninth highway dis trict plus Randolph County are represented by the district council Vincent said the union will be ready to negotiate Feb 1 We usually dont have any problems with our negotiations Were not unreasonable with what we ask for Thf new contract probably will be for longer than one year because of the absence of federal wage controls he added Another construction contract with the 400member Iron Workers Local 782 expires May 1 Andrew Pribble assistant business representative of the local said iron workers in 11 Southern Illinois counties plus southeastern Missouri and western Kentucky will be af fected by the contract In Southern Illinois the un ions contract is with the South ern Illinois Builders tion and the Egyptian Contrac tors Association Pribble said thecurrent basic wage is per hour Negotiations will begin 60 to 90 days prior to the May 1 expiration date he said More than 200 production workers at Tuck Industries Inc in Carbondale will be af fected when the companys con tract with the Laborers Inter national Union of North Amer ica expires March 1 Jess Heern secretarytreasurer of the unions Southern District Council said Tuck employes will return to work Jan 6 after a twoweek plant shutdown The contract between area chain food stores and District 99 of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of America expires April 5 district president Robdrt de Rousse said About 100 meat cutters work ing for Kroger A P National and TriCity supermarkets in Southern Illinois and southeast ern Missouri will be affected by the expansion of the 15 month pact Under the current settlement journeyman meat cutters are paid for a 40hour week head meat cutters are paid on a basis of volume and meat clerks are paid a percentage of the journeymans wages de Rousse said Contracts for about 200 meat cutters employed by about 90 independent stores expire June 28 he added Between 125 and 140 mem bers of the Painters Local 352 will have their twoyear con tract with the Painting and Decorating Contractors of America and various indepen dent contractors expire June 30 Business representative Jam es Cloud said the local repre sents residential commercial and industrial painters ir Jack son Perry and Randolph coun ties The price council sent to Bethlehem Steel a telegram similar to others sent last week to U S Steel and C F I ur gently requesting justification for the price increase The new prices mainly affect the steel used to frame sky scrapers and bridges carbon steel plates used for machin ery railroad products pipe and tin miU products They do not affect steei that goes into the manufacture of automobiles appliances and other consumer goods In other economic develop ments Acting Chairman Al U1I man of the House Waysand Means Committee said his panels first goal for 1975 will be to enact a sizable tax cut Certainly it has to be a sizable package of tax relief benefits both to the individuals and to the corporate economy the Oregon Democrat said in a publictelevision interview The Agriculture Depart ment said next years winter wheat crop couldbe up 15 per cent from the 1974 harvest This years crop reduced by poor weather was insufficient to meet demand contributing to high food prices Bankruptcy filings last month were down from Oc tobers record high the gov ernment said but projections showed fiscal 1975 could set a new record for financial fail ures Meanwhile a spokesman for Kissinger said that the sec retary has never seen any survey of American citizens by the CIA andhe doesnt know if any such survey exists But later administration sources disclosed that Kiss inger had seen one CIA docu ment referring to activities in side me United States by American citizens of organiza tions They said however that it was philosophical and did not reflect the results of any sur veillance These sources said a CIA survey entitled Restless Youth crossed Kissingers desk at the National Security Council in March 1969 They described it as a general philosophical discussion of the youth movement abroad with references to the attitudes of American students and youth in the United States during the 1960s Angleton 57 and a veteran of 31 years in the intelligence field said he would leave the agency at the end of the month Angleton said he was resigning not because he felt he was guilty of any wrongdoing but because of what he said were the interests of the agency A well informed source said the resignationhad been ar ranged late last week in a meeting between Angleton and Colby Colby also was said to feel that Angleton was not in volved in any illegal activities It was understood that Angle tons public identification had been a factor in the resigna tion Busy busy busy You say its Christmas Eve and you still havent bought last min ute gifts the cat just upset the Christmas tree and you just got 15 greeting cards from people you forgot Regardless of how busy today is for you it cant be as hectic as has been for the fellow in the red suit and white beard Southern Ulinoisan photographer Tom Porter caught these rf Santa as he intently listen ed to lastminute requests con templated his route then mo mentarily seemed stunned by the scope of the journey hell make to visit homei every where tonight But no matter how busy his day Santa is sure to find time tonight visit his favorite the children Leader1 missing Nixon again focus of Watergate trial Washington AP Attention at the Watergate coverup trial again is focused on the absence of Richard M Nixon as defendant or witness in the case that drove him from the presidency U S District Judge John J Sirica started Monday to com ment on the pardon granted Nixon by President Ford but then restrained himself Its too bad well I better not saywhat Im thinking said the judge after the jury had been sent from the court room to begin a twoday Christmas recess The issue of the Nixon pardon came up during William S Frates closing argument to the jury on behalf of his client former Nixon aide John D Ehrlichman Frates recalled that pros ecutor James F Seal had likened the five coverup de fendants to members of an or chestra saying that while some may play far less than others all are essential parts of the total orchestration Frates picked up Neals analogy Ladies and gentlemen were missing one person here the orchestra leader thats who were missing in this case   

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