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Southern Illinoisan Newspaper Archive: December 20, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Southern Illinoisan

Location: Carbondale, Illinois

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   Southern Illinoisan (Newspaper) - December 20, 1974, Carbondale, Illinois                                PUBLICATION OPFICI Carbondale 710 N Illinois Murphyibore 1113 Wilnut Henin 21JN lefli Volume ttNo 3071 Se Copy J Sections M Dilly jaornil Mtirphysbew l iPRIDAV DECEMBER 20 Living costs grow as earnings shrink Washington AP Hie government reported to day that the cost of living rose another ninetenths of one per cent in November while work ers real earningsdeclined to their lowest level since 1967 The Labor Department said a decline of 18 per cent in work ers real earnings during the month meant the nations workers were earning 56 per cent less than a year ago The increase of ninetenths of one per cent in consumer prices matched the October increase and pushed the cost of living 121 per cent higher in November than it was a year earlier This was the biggest 12 month increase since a 126 per cent increase in the 12 months ending in September of 1947 For the first 11 months of 1974 the cost of living was re ported up 114 per cent The Consumer Price Index stood at 1543 of the 1967 average of 100 meaning that it cost to buy a statistical supply of Workers real earnings at lowest level since 1967 goods that sold in 1967 for E B Speer chairman of U S Steel Corp was scheduled to meet today with Albert Sees chairman of the Council on Wage and price Stability to explain US Steels price hikes The company also was to deliver a written justification that Forddemanded Tuesday The President had called the price increases disap pointing Meanwhile the massive auto industry layoffs a major in gredient of the deepening re cession mounted Thursday Ford Motor Co announced a 28 per cent cut in car produc tion inthe first three months of 1975 a move throwing 64000 workers off the job for part of the period The Ford companys an nouncementbrings the number of auto industry layoffs set for January to at least 289000 or more than 40 per cent of the automakers total bluecollar work force White House Press Secretary Ron Nessen said Thursday there could be additional presidential action on the It the price of goes up so will oil Shah of Iran says By the Associated Press The Shah of Iran is unhappy with the recent FrenchAmeri can gold agreement and has warned that an increase in the official price of gold will be matched by higher oil prices The 55yearold ruler of the worlds second largest oil ex porter contended that an in crease in the official price of gold would decrease the value of the dollars Iran and the other oil nations get for their oil If our purchasing power is lost everything goes said the Shah in an exclusive interview with the Associated Press He indicated that the Or ganization of Petroleum Ex porting Countries would cancel the ninemonth price freeze it agreed on last week after rais ing the price of crude oil 38 cents a barrel Higher oil prices will surely follow the monarch said It wont be just a question of a few per cent inflation It could eventually be the collapse of the whole monetary system Financial experts in Europe were mystified by the Shahs concern They pointed out that President Ford and French President Valery Giscard dEstaing at their meeting in Mairtinique last weekend did not agree to raise theofficial value of national gold reserves to the market price They agreed that nations could use the market value when pledg ing their national gold reserves as security for loans to pay their huge oil bills Common Market officials in Brussels termed this a book keeping operation only They pointed out that Italy revalued part of its gold reserve in this fashion last August to secure a billion loan from West Ger many The Shah brushed off a sug gestion that the 38cent in crease in oil prices might bankrupt some Western cus tomers that was nothing he steel issue after todays meetings The government council has no authority to forbid price ini creases But the agency could hold public hearings to focus public attention on steel prices Meanwhile Congress neared final action on several eco nomic measures including one to alleviate the unemployment situation Both houses approved the first billion to finance a public service jobs program and a full 52 weeks of unem ployment benefits for most persons laid off SenateHouse conferees agreed on a bill to increase in terest charged on back taxes The bill would increase from 8 per cent a year to 9 per cent the interest rate paid both by tardy taxpayers and the gov ernment on any tax overpay ments The Senate rejected a billion federal spending cut defeating a move to keep fed eral spending near the billion level in the current fis cal year In other economic develop ments The Commerce Depart ment reported that aftertax prof its of the nations corpora tions increased 135 per cent in the third quarter this year However the department said there was virtually no change in profits from the second quarter after subtracting pro fits attributed to the rising value of business inventories AnAssociated Press sur vey showed that telephone companies from coast tocoast are seeking rate increases contending they need the extra money to keep up with infla tion Wm Wrigley Jr Co an nounced today a 14 per cent wholesalepriceincrease of ita 20pack box of sevenstack President Ford and Rockefeller leave White First day as vice president Rockefeller pledges to be quiet helpful V sadd The price of Oil has not packaged gum vet even reached what ft would A spokesman cited higher take to woduce alternate material costs especially M gar for the pnce boost Watergate trial summation Prosecutor tells listen to tapes it itnitil ThiifrsiaiV dflV Washington AP Referring repeatedly to the White House tapes chief pro secutor James S Neal de Bcribed to the Watergate cover up trial jury today payments of cash and veiled offers of clem CaMl OJIU VOUCU ency he sadd were used to keep committee exWhite House aides H R Haldeman and John D Ehr lichman former assistant Atty Gen Robert C Mardian and Kenneth W Parkinson a Washington lawyer who repre sented the Nixon campaign the Watergate burglars from talking Listen to the tape Neal repeatedly told the jurors after reading portions of conversa tions between former President Richard M Nixon and his aides The five defendants listened silently while Neal outlined what he called a conspiracy to ob etruot justice on a massive scale by the highest officials of this land Charged with conspiring to obstruct the investigation of the Watergate breakin are former Atty Gen John N Mitchell Several times during his summation Neal drew laughter from spectators which brought protests from defense attorneys who urged U S District Judge John J Sirica to punish anyone caught laughing Neal referred to a March 21 1973 discussion in the Oval Of fice in which Nixon ordered hush money raised for con victed burglar E Howard Hunt Dean to his everlasting credit has had about all he can stand said Neal To his shock what hap pens The President of the United States inthe Oval Office starts to discuss how the money can be paid the prosecutor said The President of the United States in the Oval Office suggests theyd better meet E Howard Hunts demand to buy time 4 The President suggests not once not twice more than 10 times theyd better pay Hunt Neal began his summation on Thursday and got about half way through his argument to the jury before U S District Judge John J Sirica recessed the trial for the day Jury members wont be going home for Christmas but they may get an opportunity to see their families If all goes according to schedule closing arguments in the case will be concluded Monday and the trial recessed until Thursday the day after in recess for two days the jury will remain sequestered U S District Judge John J Sirica has announced Washington AP Nelson A Rockefeller began his first day as vice president by presiding over the Senate and then said he plans to be as quiet and as helpful as possible in working with President Ford Talking to reporters as he left the Capitol to return to New York with his wife Rockefeller was asked about suggestions he might pose a problem for Ford You can be assured right now he said Im not going to pose a problem for any body I want to be as quiet and as helpful and only do that which is appropriate and useful to the President and to the people of this country he added The new vice president was late his first day onthe job Delayed in Washington traffic Rockefeller missed the opening prayer at todays Senate ses sion He took his chair at Rocky expected to make impact minutes after the 9 am opening Tonight cloudy with a chance of a little snow low in the mid or upper 20s Satur day mostly cloudy and cold with highs in the upper 30s Sunday through Tuesday part ly cloudy with highs in the 30g and lows in the 20s Classified Religion Camies TV Bridge Crossword Editorials Family Living Records Sports Weather details map 4 6 14 1112 13 am five scheduled gavel Rockefeller one of Americas most experienced public servants and wealthiest men used his inaugural address Thursday night to praise the congressional review that scrutinized his career and de layed his confirmation for four months Just hours before being sworn in by Chief Justice War ren E Burger in a televised ceremony in the Senate Rockefeller was confirmed by the House 287128 President Ford members of Congress and the Cabinet Rockefellers family and a host of New York officials were on hand to witness the inaugur al Senate President Pro Tern pore James D Eastland D Miss convened the cere monies and a committee of senators conducted first Ford and then Rockefeller into the Senate chamber It was the first time television cameras were allowed in the Senate After taking the oath Rockefeller read from his own handwritten notes scrawled on a yellow legal pad and told the nation is nothing wrong with America that Americans cannot right The new vice president said fullest limit of my capacity to work with you Mr President and the Congress in the great task of building the strength of America to meet the grave new problems which we confront as a nation and as people He later told reporters that he was delighted with the margin of his approval by the House rather than disappointed that 128 members voted against his confirmation There are some Democrats who find it very hard to vote for a Republican he said reaching with a smile for the glass ofNew York state cham pagne handed him over the heads of the crowd by Nancy Kissinger wife of the secretary of state Rockefellers exact role in the federal government is up to the President who has not de fined it Rockefeller is meeting with Ford Saturday to discuss his responsibilities Gray votes for Rockefeller Rep Kenneth J Gray D West Frankfort voted in favor of the confirmation of Nelson A Rockefeller as vice presi dent Thursday Bandits free 30 hostages Richfield Minn AP Four gunmen whose escape from a supermarket robbery was a cut short at the door by a policeman dashed back inside the store and took some 30 persons hostage The bandits surrendered themselves and their unharmed captives today after a sbrfiour siege Police said the final 14 hos tages were freed about am when the last two gunmen in the store gave themselves up following a telephone confer ence with Gov Wendell An derson Another group of about 15 persons had been released an hour earlier when a third gun man surrendered The fourth robber was captured before the men grabbed their hostages The hostages ranging from small children to a woman in her mid80s emerged from their ordeal shaken but un harmed Two of the gunmen suffered minor injuries one a shotgun wound in the shoulder and the other lacerations from broken glass The gunmen were not identi fied although there were in dications that at least two of them were teenagers The sequence of events began about pmThursday when four armed masked men en tered the Country Club Super market in this Minneapolis suburb ordered customers and employes to lie on the floor and then rifled cash registers and a safe As they were leaving the store with an undetermined amount of cash a police officer in an unmarked car surprised them and a flurry of gunfire ensued The four men ran back inside but one of them was appre hended as he tried to run out a back door said Richfield Police Capt Donald Lundquist Lund quist and another officer en tered the store to negotiate with the men The wanted a car and were going to take the hostages said Lundquist They also wanted a helicopter He said negotiations were an onagain offagain thing Wed be on the verge and then something would happen Mine output returning to normal Charleston W Va AP Coal mine production began returning to normal today as mine construction workers dropped picket lines in prepa ration for weekend voting on a new contract Industry and union officials said all mines appeared to be working today in West Virginia Illinois Ohio and Pennsylvania for the first time since the miners went on strike Nov 12 for their new contract Meetings were scheduled in most United Mine Workers districts Saturday for an ex planation of the new pact to be followed by a vote on the pro posed agreement UMW officials in Washington said they hoped to know the results from the voting by late Sunday Training makes difference in area police officers 7 y inc school such as PTI But sis ndAr mes iS cmaii and sheriffs A grant of about was on By Gary Sosniecki Of The Southern Ulinoisan For six hours early one mor ning in December 1954 Jack Hazel was the only policeman on duty in the city of Car bondale population then about 10000 With a sixman police de partment that included a chief an assistant chief three patrol men and a meterman having one man on duty between 2 and 8 am was not unusual What makes mis particular morning stand out in Hazels mind 20 years later is that prior to 10 pm the evening before when his 10hour shift began he had never been a policeman before in his life Hazel who served for the next 16 years on the force including a sevenyear stint as chief readily admits that being a policeman in Southern Illinois today is not the same as it was 20 10 or even 5 years ago No longer is the typical police rfficer an untrained little edu EDITORS NOTE Todays policeman is of a different breed than the man who pat rolled the streets 20 years ago In the first of a series of artic les Reporter Gary Sosniecki examines the differences in training salaries and attitudes that make todays maninblue more professional cated patronage employe No longer does he work 60 hours a week with little or no equip ment for a salary No long er does he look at his duties as just another job Todays officer is trained in basic skills and has an increas ig opportunity to learn spe cialized skills He has attended college and possibly has a de gree He works a 40to 48hour week and is paid a respect able salary He has responded to public pressure by develop ing a professional attitude about his work Hazel resigned under pres sure and ha lack of profes sional training was one issue the merit board cited in its recommendation to the city council A new officer today has to be a lawyer a psychologist and a public relations man all in one longtime Mt Vernon Police Chief Fred Dedman says He has to be a highly train ed specialist at his work Ha zel says of todays policeman And I think this applies to the patrolmen and all me way through the department You just cant hire a man off the street Weve made tremendous progress in terms of training says Joseph Dakin Hazels suc cessor as Carbondale chief and now head of the associate de gree corrections and law en forcement program at Southern Illinois University at Carbon dale The history of police train ing in Southern Hlimi Joseph Dakin has been sketchy at bestWhen Hazel became a policeman There wasnt any train ing You acquired it on the job The Police Training Insti tute at the University of Illinois ChampaignUrbana hat been training Illinois Jack Hazel policemen since 1955 The six week 240hour course is well respected by law enforcement officials Under the Police Training Act of 1965 the state reim burses cities and counties 50 per centof the costof sending a man to an accredited train school such as PTI But the small police and sheriffs departments in rural Southern Illinois have not had the man power to enable them to send patrolmen and deputies away for long periods If youve got 30 men you can send three men away to school Dakin explains But if youve got five men and you send three away theres not enough to cover Most of the Southern Illinois officers who received training in the 1960s were graduates of a basic school held annually from 1959 to 1970 by SIUC at Little Grassy Lake The Il linois Local Governmental Law Enforcement Officers Train ing Board discontinued the course because it was less than 240 hours In 1970 the GreaterEgypt Regional Planning and Deve lopment Commission submitted a proposal to the Illinois Law Enforcement Commission for a grant to deliver traning to of ficers on an experimental ba J A grant of about was used to provide three hours of training week for 12 weeks at each county seat in me Greater Egypt district Jack son Williamson Perry Frank lin and Jefferson Of the 160 law enforcement offi cers in the region at the time 110 were graduated Other grant followed and Greater Egypt brought a six week basic training course to John A Logan College in Car tervilletaught on an extension basis by PTI A 160hour re fresher course was established in staggered rotating sessions at Marion Salem and Harris burg Threeweek and oneweek sessions on topics such as law for police police procedures narcotics investigations and use of handcuffs have been and are being scheduled at various locations in 20 Southern Illinois counties A sixweek PTI course is coming to Rend Lake College at Ina in January Why the increased emphasis on police training James Rush law enforcement planner at Greater Egypt points to the national civil disorders of the 1960s and the subsequent report of the Presidents Com mission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice issued in 1967 The report recommended among other things more training and education for po lice officers to better combat crime and money forthis pur pose was pumped into the sys tem through the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 The need for training came home to Southern Illinois after the student and racial disorders of 1970 in Carbondale Six city and university police were shot in late 1969 and 1970 Da kin says At the time 18 of the citys 40 officers had not had basic training Mandatory training begun he says No Carbondale police man has been shot   

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