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Southern Illinoisan Newspaper Archive: November 25, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Southern Illinoisan

Location: Carbondale, Illinois

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   Southern Illinoisan (Newspaper) - November 25, 1974, Carbondale, Illinois                                PUBLICATION OFFICE Carbondalo 710 N Illinois Murphyiboro 1113 Waliwf Htrrin 212 N Uth 010175 Volume a Copy 2 Sections 20 Pagea J SUCCMW tn Frtt Prw Hwrln Dlly Murphysboro MONDAY NOVEMBER UMW negotiators win new concessions from industry tu in the mornme with of which President Ford and other He saidthe council Washington AP United Mine Workers nego tiators with some help from the Ford administration have won further concessions from the coal industry in a proposed new threeyear contract UMW President Arnold Miller must now sell the new package to his 38member bargaining council which balked at an earlier proposal The council must approve any agreement before it can be to the unions 120000 members who went on strike Nov 12 Union and industry officials declined to discuss details of the new package hammered out Sunday night A union spokesman said its contents would not be released until after the bargaining council meets on Tuesday at the earliest Treasury Secretary William E Simon who played a role in negotiating the new proposal called it an improved package The original proposal an nounced Nov 13 contained wage and benefit increases of about 50 per cent over the threeyear period But council members told Miller to reopen negotiations and seek major changes including wage in creases higher than the 9 per cent proposed for the first year In a joint statement Sunday night Miller and chief industry negotiator Guy Farmer said both sides had agreed in principle on improvements in the tentative contract package We intend to devote Monday to the task of finalizing con tract language so that a com plete and final document can be presented for the ratification process without delay the statement said Miller issued a separate statement praising chief federal negotiator W J Usery Jr His evenhanded treat ment of both parties bridged the difficult gap between us at the crucial time Miller said Usery and Simon intervened Sunday after noting that the mine workers and the industry had been unable to resolve their differences themselves Usery spent much of Sunday shuttling back and forth between rooms in Washingtons HayAdams Hotel meeting with one side and then the other Simon concentrated his ef forts on the coal industry He Arms reduction pact called breakthrough President Ford and Brezhnev after cornVnunique Thomas Leff ler charges dropped By Tony Stevens Of The Southern Ulinoisan Criminal charges of tamper tog with public records were dismissed today in circuit court in Murphysboro against former Southern Illinois Uni versity at Carbondale Security Chief Thomas Leffler The indictments were dis missed by States Atty Howard Hood during brief arguments on a motion to sever charges against Leffler and former co defendant Danilo Orescanin a former vice president of the university The dismissal means Leffler expected to be a witness for the state against Orescanin In a jury trial scheduled for Dec 11 The motion to sever the cases filed by Hood and con curred in by Lefflers counsel James Lawder says state ments made by Leffler outside the presence of Orescanin tend to implicate Orescanin in the offenses alleged The motion also stated the state plans to have Leffler M a state witness in the sche duled trial against Orescanin Murphysboro attorney David Watt Jr counsel for Orescan Iri made a brief objection to the motion for severance Watt said the motion referi to a statement but said Orescanin had not seen the statement and had not received a copy of it Any implication Is Im possible to determine without reading the statement Watt said If the state has made deal with Leffler it would be better to dismiss charges against him or1 grant him im munity and go on with the case Wattsaid Hood then moved to dismiss the indictments against Leffler In a brief formal arraign ment before Judge Peyton Ktmce Orescanin then pleaded not guilty to two counts of an indictment returned in July charging him with tampering with public records The charges allege misuse of invoices to purchase alcoho lic beverages from the Carbon dale Holiday Lin for university purposes Washington AP President Ford returned from his Soviet summit meeting with an armsreduc tion pact that an aide called one of the most significant agreements since World War n The pact reached between the President and Soviet Com munist leader Leonid I Brezhnev in Vladivostok placed a numerical limit on the number of US and Soviet in tercontinental ballistic missiles and sub marinelaunched missiles carrying multiple in dependently targeted warheads The agreement includes bombers for the first time Its understood that Ford is awaiting a written Soviet statement detailing the exact terms of the verbal agreement before announcing publicly the numbers of warheads and missiles systems involved Ceilings on the strategic forces of both nations have been accepted Ford told an airport welcoming audience Sunday night A good agree ment that will serve the In terests of the United States and the Soviet Union is within our grasp Ford will brief Democratic and Republican congressional leaders Tuesday and other members of Congress later in the week One official indicated the President might reveal details of the agreement in a nationwide television address within a week White House Press Secretary Ron Nessen who praised the agreement as one of the most significant since World War II predicted that the summit would produce a SALT agree ment that almost certainly will Ford home from Russia be signed next year Former President Richard M Nixon could not achieve this in five years but Ford achieved it in threemonths Nessen said The agreement was called I breakthrough in strategic arms negotiations by Secretary of State Henry A Kissinger Kissinger told reporters in Vladivostok that the total number of Soviet missiles bombers and other delivery systems would be below cur rent Soviet strength US missiles in place in Europe would not be counted against the American total he said The Soviet Union has more and larger missiles while the United States has more multi pie warheads and intercon tinental bombers Ina joint by Ford and Brezhnev in Vladivostok a Soviet port city on theeastern coast the two nations sadd a longterm nuclear weapons agreement would be a significant con tribution to improving relations between the United States and the USSR to reducing the danger of war and to enhancing world peace The communique also ex pressed the leaders concern about the dangerous situa tion in the Middle East and reaffirmed an Intention to bring about a just and lasting peace It called for resump tion of the Geneva peace con ference at soon as possible Kissinger calls on Chou Enlai Peking AP Secretary of State Henry A Kissinger flew into China to day called on Premier Chou Enlai and reassured Chinese leaders later at a dinner that a normalization of relations is a fixed principle of US forejgn policy In the last years the rela tions between our two countries have moved ahead steadily Kissinger said in a toast I am here to continue this process and I am confident it will suc ceed Kissinger who is staying In China until Friday is prepared to dscuss further progress Illinois speedup ordered Welfare ruling upheld Washington AP The Supreme Court today upheld a lowercourt order re quiring Illinois officials to replace lost welfare checks more speedily The court affirmed without comment a ruling by a three Judge federal panel on a com plaint brought by welfare reck pients The recipients challenged regulations under which a check reported missing could not be replaced until a stop payment order had reached the state treasurer or until it was that someone other than the recipient had cashed the check Recipients who had reported missing checks were eligible for emergency assistance When the checks were replac ed the amount of the emergency aid was deducted from the substitute check The threejudge court ruled that checks must be replaced within 30 days unless the red has made a previous fraudulent request Recipients must be given a prompt hear ing to determine if a fraudulent request has been made the court said Here U summary of other Supreme Court action today The court Refused to decide whether the government can be held liable for discriminating against women workers before the Equal Employment Op portunity Act was passed in 1972 Declined to decide whether a school system where white pupils are the minority can transfer all whites to a single integrated school The case originated in Wlkox County Ala where 1733 black and 100 white pupils were enrolled last year in pubUc schools met in the morning with of ficials of the Bituminous Coal Operators Association then later closeted himself for three hours with the associations negotiators Simon also met briefly with Miller Simon said he joined the talks as the administrations chief economic spokesman noting that a prolonged coal strike can have very serious economic implications Simon impressed in dustry the seriousness with which President Ford and other administration officials view the coal strike according to N T Camicia BCOA chairman The UMW bargaining council in Washington will take a look at a second proposed contract from the coal companies at 1 pmTuesday Gene Mitchell bargaining council member from Benton said Some chan ges have been made Mitchell said but he does not know what they are toward normalizing relations between the two countries and brief the Chinese on the new USSoviet nuclear arms understanding A senior American official emphasizedthat the visit the seventh by Kissinger and first In a little over a year was ar ranged long before the just completed summit between President Ford and Soviet leader Leonid I Brezhnev in Vladivostok The official said no major announcement was expec ted RAIN Tonight fair and cold low 25 to 30 increasing cloudiness high 47 to 52 Wed nesday and Thursday cloudy chance of showers mild Wed nesday colder Thursday Lows Wednesday and Thursday in the 30s highs Wednesday in the 50s INDEX Classified Comlei TV Brldje Crossword Editorials Family living Farm Records Sports Weather details City Hall closed today 4 i U Firemen Glenn Stearns In window and FranU converse iill at the Meond story J5 He said the council Tuesday will see the new proposal for the first time The only changes he knowi for certain will be on the new proposal deal with pay and va cations Mitchell said Other sought after changes according to an informed source deal with bringing the pay within job classification closer together getting UMW welfare cards to cover unrelat ed mine injuries indefinitely and changes dealing with work ing days in strip mines City hall burns in Carbondale By Joseph Arimond Of The Southern Ulinoisan The Carbondale City Hall Is dosed today Fire broke out shortly after 1 am today on the third floor at the rear of the building end spread throughout the struc tures top floor Smoke and water damage however is re ported throughout the building Carbondale Code Enforce ment Director John Yow esti mates structural damage in excess of Precise esti mates on loss of office furni ture and equipment wiring carpeting and office supplies were still pending today Carbondale Fire Chief Char les McCaughan said the fire started when a gas furnace on the third floor malfunction ed The nature of the malfunc tion is not yet known he said Firemen from Station No 1 located on the first floor of city hall directly below the fires point of origin had re turned from a minor fire call on East Main Street when they saw what looked like smoke coming from a mercury vapor street light next to die build ing When they began smelling smoke a second look detected smoke coming from several third floor windows As far as I known thats the best response time to a fire weve had yet McCaug han joked Major damage is reported throughout the third floor where the Model Cities offices are located Model Cities Dir ector Robert Stalls said it was too early today to tell just how much damage there was or what records had been lost I put 300 hours into this he said looking at his charred reference library A new copying machine de livered to Stalls office last week was water soaked and charred with black ash No telephone calls could received by the city today The telephone switching equipment located on the third floor about 20 feet from the fires point of origin was damaged None of the police depart ments evidence contained in one room of the third floor was damaged Carbondale Po lice Chief George Kennedy said almost all the material stored there Is kept in metal contain ers City inspectors oould see day light through one part of the third floor ceiling A hole in part of the floor now gives Planning Department Director James Rayfield a direct view to the third floor from his sec ondfloor office Offices on the first and sec ond floors were not damaged seriously Water however has City hall facilities to move info University City complex Story on page 3 soaked carpeting and caused paneled walls and ceiling tiles to buckle Yow said It would take a minimum of just to replace all the ceiling tiles installed in the remodeled 60 yearold building several ago A group of about 10 police men and public works em ployes shuttled computer rec ords containing valuable pay roE and water and sewer bill ing information from the first floor File cabinet drawers and papers also were carried out Nothing was removed from the second floor during the fire The computer was not damag ed Firemen spread plastic cov ers over most of the office equipment on the second floor City Manage1 Carroll Fry said hell need a new chair Firemen covered bis desk with plastic but not his chair Firemen who sleep at the rear of the first floor have moved their bedroom Into their small kitchen Water damage brought down most of the ceil ing in the station About J inches of water covered the firemens1 bedroom Thick smoke covered most of the second floor as firemen fought the fire with an aerial ladder in the police station parking lot and hauled heavy hoses up the winding narrow stairs Firemen inside wore air tanks and masks to in the eyeburning smoke Flames never quite broke through the roof of the building A moderate wind on gree night might have fanned the blaze If air could have reached the heart of the In terior fire After the fire was beaten down water cascaded down the back stairs City employes posted a sign on the city halls front door today which in part reads Occupancy Prohibited No Tres passing 28 witnesses heard Prosecution resfs up trial in cover Washington AP The prosecution today rested Its case against the five defen dants in the Watergate cover up trial In the almost six weeks since they were selected the jurors heard 28 prosecution witnesses and more than 20 hours of White House tapes Judge John J Sirica is to receive by Friday a con fidential report from three c o u r t a ppointed doctors recommending whether former President Richard M Nixon may be able to testify at the trial The three physicians led by Dr Charles A Hufnagel surgeon from Georgetown University Medical School ar rived at Long Beach Calif Sunday The panel will study hospital records and possibly examine Nixon before reporting back to Sirica Hufnagels spokesman said the three doctors would draft a written report for Sirica who must then decide a number of various options They include taking a written deposition from the former president moving the trial to California or taking no testimony at tlL   

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