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Southern Illinoisan Newspaper Archive: November 13, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Southern Illinoisan

Location: Carbondale, Illinois

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   Southern Illinoisan (Newspaper) - November 13, 1974, Carbondale, Illinois                                PUBLICATION OFFICI CariMndale 710 N llllMlt Murphysbera 1113 Walnwl Htrrin 212 N Utb Vohimt 12No a Copy 4 Sections 2 Svpplwn Iteimjflfaoisan li WEDNESDAY NOV U Iff r LS NEWSPAPERS BOX 789 ILL 62525 CartwdaleHeirinMurphyibore Coal operators make new contract offer I hnth tides have Miners currently Washington AP A top officer of the United Mine Workers said negotiators are hopeful of reaching agree ment today on a new contract move that could limit the nationwide coal strike to two weeks It may take a little more talking but I think we can iron this thing out today said Harry Patrick the UMWs sec retarytreasurer Patrick made the comment as he emerged during a re cess in the talks while indus Gas tax boost studied c Washington StarNews Washington Interior Secretary Rogers Morton said today that the Ford administration is now considering a raise in the federal excise tax on gasoline as a major solution to the na tions energy problem Morton chairman of the Presidents Energy Research Council said that he was aware Ford said before the elections that there would be no such tax increase while he was presi dent I dont think he has been presented with the whole package said Morton who explained that a gasoline tax coupled with incentives for energy conservation and an excess profits tax on the energy Industry may be a way to sell the idea to Congress Sundays in future Chicago AP Many service stations In Illinois and Indiana are plann ing to start gasless Sundays again Dec 1 Robert Jacobs executive director of the Illinois associa tion said the move is a protest against what he called unfair treatment by the government and major oil companies But he added that during last years energy crisis We learned to like Sundays off so we could be with our families The big oil companies say wrory about our big profits we need them for the massive investments in new refineries and exploration Jacobs said But instead of investing in oil the big oil companies are buying depart ment stores and circuses and what have you Byline BG to appear twice weekly Starting today Byline BG the regular column by Southern Illinoisan Regional Editor Ben Gelman will appear twice each week In addition to his Sunday column Gelman will also write a column that will be publish ed each Wednesday Todays Byline BG appears on Page 2 Gelmans columns cover Sou thern Illinois its history its peo ple its flora and fauna and its follies and wisdom Todays column examines the UMW contract of 1912 and tells a little of what it was like to be a coal miner in those days Things are a little dif ferent some things havent changed much try negotiators studied the unions response to its new con tract offer put on the bargain ing table Tuesday night As the strike that threatened thousands of layoffs in other industries entered its second day the coal talks resumed here at am EST Both coal and union officials indicat ed a settlement is near Patrick said earlier that the new industry proposal is pret ty good Chief industry nego tiator Guy Farmer said it could settle the contract UMW President 3rd graf UMW President Arnold Miller said union leaders were studying the proposal and would resume negotiations later today The industry made its pro posal late Tuesday night as the dayold strike tightened its grip on the already weakening economy US Steel Corp the nations biggest producer an nounced a 25 per cent produc tion cutback and said it would lay off 13700 employes this week Major railroads furloughed more than 2000 workers The giant Tennessee Valley Authority with only a 44day coal reserve called for a voluntary cutback in electricity use in its sevenstate power area It asked for a 50 per cent reduction in street lighting shorter business hours a ban oa outdoor electrical advertis ing and the lowering of thermostats to 65 degrees In the coal fields striking miners debated how long they could hold out without paychecks or strike benefits which the UMW does not pay The strike which began of ficially at am Tuesday shut down mines producing 70 per cent of the nations coal Even if a tentative agreement was reached this week the UMW said it would take at least two weeks to get a new contract ratified and to put the mines tawork again Farmer described the new Industry offer as a complete total package which was put forth not as a bargaining gambit but as proposal that could settle con tract Patrick agreed saving It put both sides closer together than ever before after nine weeks of negotiations At this point Im very very optimistic that we can wrap this thing up very soon he told newsmen Although both sides have almost continually expressed optimism over the chances of a settlement sources close to the talks indicated the new offer represented a final push by the operators to close out the contract Details of me proposal were disclosed but officials on botfc sides have indicated the final settlement would range in excess of a 40 per cent increase in wages and benefits over three years Miners currently average to a day a rate comparable with the auto and steel In dustries But unlike auto and steel workers miners get no sick pay or costofliving in creases They draw retirement pensions of a month less than half of what most other industrial workers receive Safety also is a priority issue in the talks with the UMW demanding the right to pull its men out of any mine it deems unsafe Sales drop Merchants say strikes have hurt their business Owner Charles Chandler of th Vhie Stor In Wert Frankfort with not Photo by Ed ureerj Some Southern Illinois mer chants say they are beginning to feel the effects of striking coal miners G e n e r a 1 Tel ephone Norge and Du Quoin1 Packing Co employes David Hatfield manager of the Cheker Service Station in Energy said gasoline sales have dropped off 2000 gallons a week since the International Association of Machinsits Lodge 554 went on strike Oct 15 at the Norge Co in Herrin A lot of our trade depends on the Norge people Hatfield said He said the coal miners strike in its second day has not affected his business yet Zwicks Ladies Store in Herrin had a record sales day Monday on Veterans Day Leon Zwick owner said but there is no question with all the coal min ers and Norge on strike its bound to affect sales H they strikes last long we will exist but it will not be as profitable an existence Zwick said Fay sales clerk at Lot0SayingsStorein Herrin saidi It hasnt hurt us a bit Sales are normal but if they stay out long enough I think it will Woodrow Boren coowner of Borens IGA Foodliner in Her rin said food sales are down 4 to 5 per cent He said food stamps some strikers are receiving help off set losses some But I would rather see their paychecks Food sales are especially down on Fridays and Satur days when the Norge workers normally were paid he said He said sales of lottery tick ets also have decreased with the strikes Fortunately we dont de pend solely on coal miners anymore but we still have our share of them Herrin Mayor John McVey said Several area merchants said they believe the General Tele phone strike also will have a negative impact on sales if it continues The True Value store in West Frankfort has been suffering a decrease in business for the past two months manager Charles Chandler said The people are just waiting and seeing and theyre not buy ing much Chandler said the store which used to be an automotive store stocks large items such as bicycles and water heaters Pepole are coming in and pricing things and asking if theyll be there when this is all over Chandler said If they dont get it settled were going to have The coal hit busi ness the hardest Chandler said although the general ecc noinic situation is not good People still are laying away items for Christmas he said but they are putting away the smaller stuff These people want to pay their bills Chandler said I dont want to give the impression that were in a bind Business was excellent for the first half of the year but now has dropped off considerably he said We looked for a lot more business than were getting The area strikes have not had much effect on The Show room 119 W Market St Chris topher according to Katherine Cury owner The Showroom is a womens apparel shop Business has been about the same Miss Cury said Our business covers a radius of about 150 miles and we are very grateful that our business has not been hurt Thompsonville residents em ployed as coal miners are tightening the spending belt during the coal strike accord ing to Supt Neal Clem of the Thompsonville Grade School Most of the miners are anx ious to get back to work he said I dont believe they think it will be a long strike The economic situation has the community of Thompson ville worried and most of the residents feel that the strike will beover by Thanksgiving Neal said About 40 per cent of the working males in Thompson ville are employed as miners Neal said The effects of the miners strike began to be felt before the strike began according to two Du Quoin store managers About two months ago peo ple were buying Christmas gifts I think the buyers were miners trying to get their shopping done before the strike started About two weeks ago people started to cut back in their spending The Du Quoin packing plant strike has also held sales down Betty MU eur manager of the Montgom eryWard Catalog Sales Store saiL manager of nieDu QuouTFood Park said Things started tightening up before the miners strike be gan The packing company strike has affected sales but the effect of the miners strike will be greater because there are many many mines in the county The 250 members or the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America Local 530 have been on strike at the Du Quoin Pack ing Co since March 11 union honors lines UMW pickets close Saline County mines Universities told to cut back requests 10 nPr 115 Percent over the fall of SIUCs budget request ap By Paul Ingrassia LindsaySchaub News Service Springfield Fiscal 1976 budget requests by state colleges and universities drew sharp criticism Tuesday from Donald Prince chairman of the Illinois Board of Higher Education Princer said he discussed the requests with Gov Daniel Walker and added I dont see it in the cards that any one will come out with a 30 per cent in crease The boards staff had reported at the meeting that the total FY 76 capital and operating budget requests totalled 30 per cent more than the FY 75 appropriations I talked with the governor about these requests Thurs day Prince said and I could tell by the ashen look on his face that he had already read them I would urge the universi ty governing boards to take another long look at these re quests Prince said and please keep in mind in your conversations withour staff the kinds of reaction these requests have caused The total 30 per cent budget increase requested would put the states higher education expenditures at about million as opposed to a million expenditure this fiscal year Operating budget increases requested by the four senior university systems were 159 percent The University of Illinois re quested about million an increase of about million or per cent Southern Illinois University requested million an in crease of some million or 21 per cent The Board of Governors asked for about million up million or 193 per cent The Board of Regents re quested about million or a 141 per cent increase The community colleges submitted two alternate budget requests The full need re quest is million a 40 per cent increase over FY 75 while the basic need request is some million which is a 193 per cent increase over the FY 75 budget level of million In addition to receiving budget requests the higher board received enrollment reports showing that enrollments as a whole were up but that some campuses had enrollment declines this fall Total public higher education enrollment for the state was up 115 per cent over the fall of 1973 SIUCs budget request ap proved by the SIU Board of Harrisburg AP Pickets from the striking United Mine Workers of America shut down two mines of a rival union today in Saline County A spokesman for tne Progressive Mine Workers of America in Harrisburg said pickets showed up with the morning shift at two un derground mines operated by the Sahara Coal Co about 200 PMWA members honored the picket lines Northwest Herrin Two other PMWA mines in Illinois one a Sahara strip mine in Saline County were still open A Sahara spokesman rerusea comment on the situation and a UMWA official said he hadn t heard of the picketing Kenneth Dawes president of the UMWA in Illinois said Tuesday no such picketing had been authorized The 200 newly idled mmerf had just received a a day raise Tuesday the comumtinUeegs this year to operate the Car Declines occurred at the U of I Urbana campus 11 per SlUCarbondale 42 per and Chicago State University 21 per The higher board also Appointed a committee to compile affirmative action hiring recommendations The action came after strong criticism of affirmtaive action efforts in higher education by board member Dr Diego Redondo Received a staff report on the status of the revision of the states higher education master plan is million for facul staff salary increases million for new programs at me School of Medicine and million for other new and expanded programs The total SIU system request asks for SIUC an increase of 000 for theSchool of Medicine an increase of 911000 for SIUE an increase of for the Dental School an increase of and for the board office an increase of Guerrilla chieftain addresses General Assembly LSMOW WCTIfllfW I Arafat brings Palestinian case before UN 1 1A10 Palestinian securitv the JDL operations United Nations AP Greeted by resounding cheers Arab guerrilla chieftain Yasir Arafat brought the case of the Palestinians before the UN General Assembly to day Arafat wearing his tradi tional Arab headdress responded to the cheers and applause of delegates by holding his hands clasped over his traditional gesture of victory Arafat arrived in New York from Algeria just before sunup Surrounded by security men he wasx escorted to the helicopter which whisked him to the United Nations garden He was quickly hustled inside the building His speech to the General Assembly was delayed for more than an hour without ex planation The General Assembly voted last month to allow the PLO to represent Palestinian refugees Arafat was expected to de mand in an afternoon speech nationhood for the Palestinians on the Israelioccupied west bank of the Jordan River and the Gaza Strip and to invite the Israelis to join the Palesti nians some day in a secular state uniting Moslems Jews and Christians Arafat and hisparty arrived from Kennedy Airport after a flight from Algiers Their two choppers touched down in the UN garden just before 7 am Hassan said the party in cluded Arafat four advisers i and 1012 Palestinian security men swelling the PLO con tingent to about 3032 persons Security for Arafats arrival was unprecedented in New York where feeling against the PLO runs high among the citys two million Jewish residents In fact one Jewish Defense League member openly threatened Arafat with assassination But attorneys for Russell Eelner 33 contended the JDL operations officer was just puffing when he said during a news conference that men had been trained to kill Arafat US Atty Paul J Cahill replied that Kelner made the threat with a 38caliber revolver on a table before him US Magistrate Harold J Raby heard both sides Tuesday and ordered Kelner held in bail for a Nov 22 hearing Diagraph delays expansion plans Diagraph Industries Inc has to when plans for the plant put off plans for a small manu might continue facturing plant in northwest probably will not took Herrin at it until about midway next Diagraph purchased the 7 vear acre site from the Herrin fte plant construct Chamber of Commerce and had empioy about 25 planned to construct the new sons he said The company plant this year now employs about 160 But the current economic pic produces industrial ture has forestalled those stencils plans James R Brigham Dia thought is now being given as fuge First snowfall Ifs possible tonight Ram or snow likely tonight low in low 30s Thursday clou dy snow flurries likely high in the mid or upper 30s INDEX Classified TV Bridge Croiiwerd Editorials Family living Records Weather details map 21 4 1920 1315 20 A chance of snow tonight or early Thursday is being fore cast by weathermen at the Sou thern Illinois Airport A 40 per cent chance of pre cipitation is forecast for later todayxin the form of ram pos sibly turning to snow as tem peratures decrease The U S Weather Service in St Louis is forecasting rain changing to snow wtale fore casters it the Cape Girardeau Municipal Airport call for a 40 per cent chance of rain only The colder temperatures are not unseasonably cool for this time of year Unseasonably warm temperatureswere re corded a year ago today when the mercury rose to 61 de grees for the days high A low pressure system Is moving into Southern Illinois and will bring with it slightly warmer temperatures Thurs day The temperature is ex pected to drop again by the weekend ERROR Should be Floyd Rumsey   

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