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Southern Illinoisan: Sunday, September 22, 1974 - Page 1

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   Southern Illinoisan (Newspaper) - September 22, 1974, Carbondale, Illinois                                PUBLICATION OFFICE CarbondalB 710 N Illinois Murphysboro 1113 Walnut Herrin 212 N 16th Southern Illinoisan Volume 82No 22330c a Copy 5 Sections Comics Family Weekly Tabloid 2 Supplements Inse ieartendili FrM PrHi Htrrfn Billy Journil Murphyibora Indtpmdtnt SUNDAY SEPT 22 1974 SIU board not quite ready to pick SIUC president By Henry de Fiebre Of The Southern Illinoisan Chicago The Southern Illinois Univer sity Board of Trustees com pleted 20 hours of interviews with candidates for the SIUC presidency late Saturday af ternoon but apparently reach ed no early consensus on a choice for the job The board met in Chairman Ivan A Elliott Jrs private suite in a Chicago hotel after completing the last of four candidate interviews around pm Although the meeting was closed the trustees spoke in voices loud enough to be heard across the hall At several points spirited discussion among the trustees appeared to be taking place One unidentified trustee af ter an apparent straw poll on the candidates interviewed said Weve gota diffrrerice of opinion all around the Discussion loud enough to be heard across hall board During the final day of the OHare International Tower Hotel OHare Field in Chi cago board members met with candidates George C Christensen and Albert Somit Friday trustees interviewed Warren W Brandt and Char les A Leone The four men are candi dates recommended to the board for consideration in se lecting a permanent president for SIUC Their names were presented to the board two weeks ago after a campus presidential search committee completed five months of work In a press conference fol lowing the postinterview meeting of the trustees Elliott would not comment on whe ther the board had taken a straw poll of its members However one trustee ap parently Harold Fisher o f Granite City when called upon during the session was heard to say I cast my vote for Brandt He then defended his vote and explainedwhy hehad not voted for Somit Elliott said at the press conference that he had no an nouncement to make on fur ther board action in seeking a permanent president We will not make a deci sion today he said Were i tired and hard judgments should not be made when youre tired Elliott said the board has something that needs to be done and added trustees have been commissioned to do various things He did not explain what the things were Elliott said he still has no timetable for selecting a new president He continued to refuse dir ectly to say whether the four candidates interviewed this weekend were recommended by the Presidential Search Committee He seemed indirectly to con firm that information ever when he said at the endofthe twoday session that the ooard is very much impressed with the caliber of the people submitted bythe search committee Although the trustees did not finish with business Fri day until the dinner with Leone ended after 7 pm they were back at work for a 7 am breakfast Inter view with Christensen That interview concluded shortly before Saturday The board closely adhered to plans calling for four hours of discussion with each candi date and a onehour meal also with each candidate One candidate Leone term ed his five hours with board members quiteinformal and very friendly There was no attempt to seem at all covert and In an interview Friday even ing after he completedmeet ing with the trustees Leone said the session covered a wide range of topics Among the subjects discuss ed during the interview Leone said were his thoughts on SIUC in explanation of how budgets for the university are put together SIUCs educa Candiddtes tell reporter views on administration Story on Page 3 tional goals and mission com munication within the univer sity and between the presi dent and the board and ser vice by SIUC to Southern Il linois He said most of discussed with the trustees also were covered in meetr ings he had with university constituency groups when he visited the campus during the summer of intevviews The two day meeting in Chi cago cost about exclu sive of traveling expenses El liott estimated The Chicago site was chos en according to a board news release because of the avail ability of air travel to meet the schedule and convenience of candidates Only two of the candidates live in the mid west and none live inDlinois Brandt 51 will serve his last day of president of Vir ginia Commonwealth Univer sity in Richmond Oct 1 He has held the post five years resigning last month Leone at 56 the oldest of the four candidates is vice provost for research and de velopment and ex dean of the graduate school at Bowling Green State University In Bowling Green Ohio The youngest of the four men is Christensen who Is 50 He is vice president foi academic affairs at Iowa State Univer sity at Ames Somit who will turn 55 in October is executive vice pres ident at State University of New York at Three of the four candidates are scientists Brands aca demic background is in chem istry Leones is in zoology and Christensens is in veteri nary medicine Somit is Apoli tical scientist of interest is the relationship between political science and biology SIUC has been without a permanent president since David R Derge resigned un der pressure March 14 SIUC school oflaw dean Hiram H Lesar has served in the a year position since then Explosion rips Texas RR yard Houston Tex AP An explosion ripped through the Southern Pacific Railroad yards here Saturday sending almost 100 persons to hospitals and damaging buildings up to a mile away A hospital survey showed that at least 96 persons injured in the explosion received emergency room care at six hospitals Eight were admitted including one railroad company employe said to be in extremely grave condition with burns over 100 per cent of his body Fire Department spokesman Paul Carr quoted railroad of ficials as saying there were cars in the area loaded with military missiles and that one of those could have been involved in the explosion The type of missiles involved also was not immediately known Carr said later the fire was contained but continued to burn and that theres still a real possibility of more plosions Firemen continued to move exblasts The fire was just walking cautiously in the area of the fire because the threat of explosion continued for hours Firemer said one tank car contained an explosive gas and was in danger of catching fire The man in grave condition was identified as James A McKnight 56 a Southern Pacific engineer for 34 years It must have been a trem dous explosion because weve got loaded railroad cars seven parallel rows awaythat were blown sideways Carr said It had to bebig to move through seven rows of cars Some Ofthe injured wereiln side a coin laundry near the slast scene Another man in a nearby barber shop suffered a severed artery from flying glass authorities said Carr said the explosion was bllowed by a number of smallei1 across the railroad yard Carr said T here were at least 100 cars damaged Firemen contained the fire within four hours by moving railroad cars out of the area but officials said the blaze probably would have to burn itself out Carr said some of the burning cars contained butadine a petrochemical liquified gas and ethyl lead a gasoline ad ditive The explosions force shat tered windows up toa mile away Some nearby buildings received structural damage and at least one man was injuraf when a heavy steel door was lowndown0nbjm Patients atLockwood Hospital and a nearby nursing home ocated near the railroad yards were evacuated after the ex plosion as a precautionary measure Freight cars were torn apart by explosion in northeast Houston railroad yard many caught fire there were numerous injuries AP wirephote Pinckneyville votes ho on two school issues Voters in the Pinckneyville Grade School District 5 0 soundly defeated two propo sals Saturday Proposal one which propos ed a new classroom building was defeated 897 to 295 Proposal two which would have increased the education al fund levy was defeated 908 to 280 A total of 1216 people voted and there were 21 spoiled ballots Supt Hugh Malan said Well well just have to operate with the present faci lities and try to figure some thing out he said This is the second bond is sue to be defeated in Southern Illinois in the past two weeks Herrin Community district 4 voters turned down a mil lion bond issue by a 2tol margin on Sept 7 Approval of proposal one to build a new classroom build ing would have given the dis trict clearance to sell in building bonds The building would have contained 12 classrooms and a learning materials center Construction of the newbui lding would have increased taxes 32 cents per 100 assessed valuationaccording to Malan The second proposal asked that the district be allowec to levy up to per flOC assessed valuation for the ed ucational fund The maximum was previously 92 cents To the person with an as sessed valuation of passage of the first propo sal would be a tax increase of and approval of the second would mean an in crease of Crowded conditions at the grade school have resulted partially from District 205 joining the Pinokneyville grade district on July 1 1972 and Swanwick district joining in May 1973 Choate and friend Rep Clyde Choate DAnna left greets one of about guesti who paid a ticket lo attend a fundrasing parry for him at the Marion Holiday Inn Friday A series of stories on Choate and his chance to become the next Illinois Speaker of the House appears en Page The guest in the photo is Paul Simon of Car bondale who is running en the Democratic ticket for US representative from the 24th Congressional district against Republican Val Oshel of Har risburg Honduras gets Fijis full fury Tegucigalpa Honduras AP Rescue workers parachuted into the ravaged town of Choloma on Saturday and reported that 2760 bodies hav been found there bringing th confirmed death toll from Hur ricane Fifi to nearly 4000 na tionwide the g o v e r n m e n said The Honduras N a t i o n a Emergency Committee sak earlier that it believes betwee 7000 and 8000 people died in th storm which raked the Hon duran coast with 110 mile pe hour winds on Thursday Access to the hardesthit area las been difficult as most of the owlying coastal region remains under water As more and more being discovered rescue teams resorted to burn rig the corpses to avoid out ireaks of typhoid a committee pokesman said Rescuers reported that when hey reached the town of Cruz aguna whichhad a population f 1500 every house had been ashed away by floods andnot single person could be ound The emergency committee aid another 1000 bodies were ound in the coastal town of eiba which had been cut off ir three days First four deserters get amnesty By Louise Cook Associated Press Writer The first four deserters processed u n d e r President Fords clemency program were out of the Army and on their way to alternative service jobs Saturday five days after Ford Lt Tgnacio Acosta of the mergency committeesaid at ast 75 per cent of the land and 0 per cent of the roads in the ardhit northwest region were nder flood waters If the figures are confirmed he Honduran disaster would arik fourth behind the cyclone hat killed 300000 riersons in ast Pakistan in 1969 the hur cane that killed 22000 persons the West Indies in 1780 and urricane Florawhich killed 800 persons in Haiti in 963 I X Rescue operations were also eirig mounted in other parts of ardhit northwest HondurasThy nd tea and air I announced his amnesty plan to conditional restore the essential unity of Americans Thus far the program ha failed to produce a rush of sur renders by the more than 2500 men whoevaded the now defunct draft or deserted th military during the era of th Vietnam war Some of the me said they were simply bein cautious others balked at th idea of the alternative servic requirement But the plan has promptet about two dozen reported sur renders the temporary releas rbm prison of 122 deserters an 95 draft dodgers and hundreds of inquiries to US attorneys and military authorities from those still at large The first deserters processed under the program were discharged about midnight Fri lay at Ft Benjamin Harrison nd T hey each signed a state ment reaffirming allegiance to de country and promisingto omplete the alternative service ssigned Government officials refused o identify the men and said only ley had previously been in the rmy and received alternative ervice sentencesof12 20 21 nd 24 months The twoyear erm is the maximum underthe rogram They have 15 days to eport to Selective Service of cesfor assignments A spokesmanat the Indiana ase which processes all lemency cases involving the rmy and provides supoort ervices for otherbranches of military said five other eserters probably would be recessed over the Tie spokesman said that as of iflturday morning there had een 502 calls for informa OB The primary military processing center will be moved to Camp Ind on Monday and officials said they expected to process up to 150 men a day at the former training center Some concern had been ex pressed that the personal in formation given by deserters over the telephone things like name service number and ad dress might be used bv authorities to track down deserters before they decide whether render they want to sur A pentagon spokesman said Saturday that Defense Secretary James R Schlesinger had decided that such information will be closely held by the military department concerned and will not be used during the eligibility period covered by Fords program against either the inquiring deserter or any other servicemen who went AWOL To do otherwise would not he in the spirit of the Presidents program the spokesman said The Pentagon has estimated there are 12554 Vietnam era deserters at large In addition an estimated 15500 draft evaders are potentially eligible for clemency The first draft evader to sur render was John Barry 22 of San Francisco who turned himself in on Tuesday to US Atty James L Browning Bar ry was one of two draft evaders to surrender in San Francisco He said he surrendered because he didnt want anything hang ing on my head as Im getting older Final details of his alternative service still have to DC worked out Nixon prepares for hospital Long Beach Calif AP Hospital and Secret Service personnel were busy Saturday arranging for the planned ad mission Monday of former President Richard Nixon to Memorial Hospital Medical Jenter Karen Krantz spokeswoman or the 820bed hospital said Vixon will have about 10 rooms at his disposal while undergoing anticoagulant reatments for ilood clots in two his stubborn left leg Hospital officials said Nixon would spend at least three days n the hospital Meanwhile plans were under way to install at least four ad ditional telephone lines to handle calls from the press and public and a direct line to the former Western White House at San Clemente A media information center was being set up and preparing to open at 6 am Monday It was not known what time Monday on Nixon was to be admitted to the facility the largest private nonprofit hospital on the West Coast The last time Nixon was in Memorial Hospital was in late 1968 when the then newly elected President underwent a physical examination by his longtime family physician Dr John Lungren whose offices are a short distance from the hospital has been on the hospital staff since 1946 and is a former chief of staff Inside today considerable cloudi ness and cooler higher in the middle or upper 60s North to northeast winds 7 to 14 miles per hour this afternoon and northerly 5 to to miles per hour tonightTonight fair and again very cool with lows in the upper 30s or the lower 40s Monday mostly sunny and continued unseasonably cool with highs in the 60s CANCER its a killer with staggering statistics Story by Kathie Pratt on Page 17 MAX SAPPENFIELD for mer Southern Illinois Univer sity at Carbondale personnel director recalls when the university was mainly a suit case college Story by Henry de Fiebre on Page 17 JOE WIDDOWS SIUC super intendent of buildings and grounds kept the university in shape for 33 yers Page 17 CARDS PIRATES remain 12 despite losses Page 9 ILLINi UPSET nationally ranked Stanford Page 9 HERRIN MURPHYSBORO MARION post prep grid wins Page 10 DU QUOIN SPARTA lead Southwest Egyptian Page 11 SUNDAY Ann Bridge 3334 Byline BG 2528 Family Living 3538 Sports Television 7A Weather details 1   

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