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Southern Illinoisan Newspaper Archive: May 31, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Southern Illinoisan

Location: Carbondale, Illinois

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   Southern Illinoisan (Newspaper) - May 31, 1974, Carbondale, Illinois                                PUBLICATION OFFICE Carbondale Murphy sboro Herrin 710 N Illinois 1113 Walnut 212 N Utb Southern Illinoisan Volume 62No 12B10c a Copy Two 20 Pages SUCCMMT IB Prtw Hrrln Otlly Journil Murphyibwo FRIDAY MAY 31 1974 I NO IS 62525 Area s gardeners have been using sludge for years in RiBMuddv Southeast Wastewater Treat Farm Williams field sup not be i Franklin County residents strongly oppose a proposed farming operation that would use Chicagos processed sew age sludge as crop fertilizer But few seem concerned that Southern Illinois sewage treatment plants turn out the same material In fact area gardeners scoop it up for use on their crops William Johnson president of RayLee Farms Inc of Lewistown wants to operate a 3200acre grain farm north of West Fankfort using sludge shipped from Chicago by coal cars as fertilizer The Franklin County Board opposes the project The En vironmental Protection Agen cy EPA has denied a permit to operate the farm at least until 21 questions about the sludge and its use have been answered Opposition ha been centered in an organization called Resi dents Opposed to Sludge Ev erywhere Judy Heyder ROSE publici ty chairman said the organi zation has collected the signa tures of more than 11000 per sons who are opposed to the project Mrs Heyder of ROSE said she is aware that sludge is popular locally but not on such a large scale as the pro posed farm Handling our own waste is one thing but taking care of the waste of a city the size of Chicago thats some thing else she said Many like to use sludge as fertilizer in Franklin County and other Southern Illinois towns Local gardeners haul away almost all of Benton sewage plants dried sludge a plant spokesman said The demand for sludge has increased this year because more people are planting gar dens to combat high food bills the spokesman said There is no charge for the sludge Although 90 per cent of West Frankfort sewage is liquid and unavailable all of the dried sludge is claimed free of charge by residents Hex Hays a plantemploye said The liquid sludge is treated with chlorine and eventually released in the Big Muddy River Hays said Herrin residents come for bushelsful truck loads and tubsful of dried sludge from the Herrin sewage plant dry ing bedsWater and Sewer Supt Basil Russell said Its the best fertilizer there is he said Marion sells dried solidified sludge for SO cents a pickup truck load mostly to indivi duals for gardens i Sludge which hM been dn ed and then sold in Carbon dale soon will be spread on city property atCarbondales Southeast Wastewater Treat ment Plant A pumping system will be constructed this summer to pump liquid sludge to the treatment plant property James Mayhugh director of wastewater treatment plants in Carbondale said The sludge is expected to improve soil conditions Sludge produced at the citys northwest treatment plant still will be sold in bulk Most of the solid waste from the Murphysboro se w a g e treatment plant is given away and ends up on area gardens Farm Williams field sup erintendent for the Murphys boro Water and Sewage Com mission said most of the solid residue goes to small scale gardeners but the plant can give away all anyone can handle Williams said the state recommends check with users to determine what the material will be used for Generally there is no ob jection to use of the material as fertilizer on lawns and for most vegetables The state recommends it not be used for leaf lettuce but it is considered all right for any vegetable with a root system he said He said the plant has a high demand for the material in the spring and drops off in the fall and winter The material is allowed to accumulate during months of lower demand until spring and summer So far the demand has used all the material we col lect and we have not had any problem of disposing of solid materials Williams said ixon appointees illegally name Washington StarNews And Associated Press Washington Watergate prosecutors today revealed that they have evi dence of illegality in Nixon ad ministration appointments to government jobs and that per sonal communications between President Nixon and former Commerce Secretary Maurice H Stans may support this evi dence In papers filed with Chief U 6 District Judge George Hart Jr Watergate Special Prose Leon A Jaworski Prosecutors say evidence shows gifts bought posts cutor stated Circumstantial and direct evidence before the grand jury and known to the special prose cutor indicates prima facie that certain large campaign con tributors either promised con tributions in consideration of appointment to a federal post or were promised a position in re turn for a contribution The prosecutors revelation today came in court papers filed in response to Nixons claim of executive privilege asserted Thursday in a letter to Hart covering about a dozen written communications between Nixon and Stans The items sought include c o mmunications containing recommendations to the Presi dent with respect to personnel preme Court on another attempt selections and nominations Acto obtain Watergate evidence cordingly I have determined still under Nixons control The high court may rule today on whether to assume jurisdic that itwould be inconsistent with the public interest to about job during probe Washington StarNews And Associated Press Washington Assistant Atty Gen Henry E Petersen has told a federal grand jury that while he Petersen becoming director of headed ments the Justice investigation Watergate scandals President DepartFederal of the tigation Buf fireworks possible Logan trustees hope for era of peace1 By Joanne Wood Of The Southern Illinoisan In the wake of Wednesdays announcement of the resigna tion of Thomas E Deem as president of John A Logan College in Carterville board members today are express ing hopes that an era of peace will come to the Carterville campus Sue Mills of Carbondale a dental technology student at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale School of Techni cal Careers and a board mem ber for the past two years said she is not happy about losing the president of less than a year but whatever is best for Logan College is what I want and this may be the best Mrs Mills is a member of the college personnel commit tee that is already in the pro cess of looking for a new pres ident I hope that we do not try to hurry the selection process Logan College is strong now and the board wants it to remain that way she said Mrs Mills said that she does not feel that Deem is the wrong man for the job but that he came in under trying circumstances in which there had been a lack of communi cation withthe previous ad ministration headed by Nath an Ivey Perhaps the board has been too cautious too uptight but we simply want to know what is going on at all times she said Richard Hunter board member from Carbondale said he is sorry that Deem is leaving Logan College It is my personal feeling that he was never given the chance to be the chief admini strator of the college without board interference in dayto day routine matters I think the board as a whole needs to recognize that our primary function is setting policy and not administering it I hope we can learn from our past mistakes and get about the business of making Logan College as strong as possible Hunter said Deems resignation an nouncement came two weeks after the resignation of Logan College Vice President Robert E Tarvin who turned down a contract for a second year Bruce Fine of Carterville the nonvoting student board member for the past year said that most of the board members are mainly concern ed with what is happening to the students at the college Including with those con cerns are a responsibility to the community Board mem bers are directly responsible to the taxpayers in the district and are to be accountable by being available for help to faculty members administr tion and the students he said Deem said today that he would not make a comment on his resignation And before the hoped for peace descends on Logan College campus Jerome Alon gi of Du Quoin board member and past chairman said he is going to raise some fire works over another board members statement made in Wednesdays issue of The Southern Illinoisan When Clifford Batteau board member from E1 k ville accuses some board members of not having trust in the administrators why doesnt he name names Im going to call him on that state ment Tuesday night and if he means me I want to hear him say it Alongi said Nixon raised the possibility of testimony turned over to un peachment lawyers of the House Judiciary Committee Petersen asserted that the President had not offered him the FBI post merely asked if he were inter ested in the job He asked me would I like to be director of the FBI and went on and talked for about 15 minutes and I indicated that was not one of my ambitions Petersen told the grand jury in February Nixon was quick to say Im not offering you the job Petersen testified A small portion of the grand jury testimony presented to the Judiciary Committee last week as evidence in its probe of pos sible presidential involvement in the Watergate coverup was read by a committee source to the StarNews During much of the month of April 1973 when the Watergate coverup was falling apart Petersen was in virtually daily contact with the White House according to public testimony before the Watergate committee and transcripts of presidential VY1U4 UlC JJUU1HJ UlLCJCOi W yiw v 4 duce these items Nixon wrote tion in that case in which seven men are accused of covering up Nixon chose Thursday to risk the Watergate breakin me dismissal of criminal Special Watergate prosecutor charges against two former top Leon Jaworski pressured by a assistants rather than turn over Sept 9 starting date for the evidence for their defense in a coverup trial is seeking to similar case that of the White leapfrog the U S Circuit Court House plumbers of Appeals in his attempt to ob Although slightly easing rules tain tapesand documents of 64 presidential conversations A U S District Court has up held Jaworskis subpoena of the 64tapesvandhewarrtstheSU preme Court to consider the case immediately The White House wants the case to follow normal appeals procedures In the plumbers case former presidential aides John D Ehr lichman and Charles W Colson and three others are accused of violating the civil rights of Dr Lewis Fielding Daniel Ells bergs psychiatrist at the time the former Pentagon analyst leaked the Pentagon papers to the press In a threepage letter Nixon lawyer James D St Clair said the President is willing to per mit lawyers for Colson and Ehrlichman Bureau of Inves According to portions of his allU CUIIIIIIILO Lilt conversations Nixon released a search for lasting peace last month The transcripts in fact show that Petersen talked frequently with the President himself confidential aspects of the grand jury investigations The Judiciary Committee p r e s idential conversations Thursday despite Nixons in sistence he will turn over no more Watergate material Tonight clearing and cooler low in 50s Saturday sunny high in low or mid 70s INDEX Classified 1317 Religion 5 Comics TV Bridge Crossword 19 Editorials 4 Family Living 6 Records IMS Sports 1112 Weather details map 18 on access to White House evi dence the President restated Thursday his determination to remain the final arbiter of what evidence is released to a federal court In a third Watergate case the White House sought to block an early hearing before the Su handwritten to look through and typewritten notes they say are needed for a fail1 trial However before the special prosecutor gets any access to the same material Nixon will decide what evidence should be provided to GeselLs courtthe letter said Letting the others do the walking Illinois Gov Dan Walker munches on hot dog and holds flag while viewing Memorial Day parade along Chicagos Michigan Avenue Thursday Gov Walker participated in the parade greeting people along the route then relaxed to watchremainder of parade pass by Illinois celebrated Import tax cuts get nod Washington AP President Nixon announced today that U S and Common Market negotiators have agreed on a formula for reducing European import duties on a significant number and volume of American exports In a statement at the White House Nixon said resolution of this important issue repre sents a major step toward im proved Atlantic relation ships Officials said the formula in volves duty reductions on U S exports on tobacco oranges and grapefruit kraft paper photographic film nonagri cultural tractors excavating machinery diesel and marine engines and outboard motors engine additives measuring in struments pumps plywood and other items According to the officials value of U S exports to Com mon Market nations of these items are in the range The reductions are intended to compensate for tariff changes which occurred when the Com mon Market was enlarged to include Great Britain Ireland and Denmark officials said They added that formula ap proved by the Common Market today does not include com pensation claimed by the U S for cereal grain export cover age Summit talks set Washington AP President Nixons summit talks with Soviet leaders will open June 27 the White House announced today The date is several days later than expected an adjustment caused by Nixons plans to tour Memorial Day Thursday the Middle East during mid while federal observances June were held last Monday The Moscow talks expected to AP Wirephoto last abouta week will be the third in a series Historic enemies committed to search for lasting peace Pact silences guns on Golan Heights Geneva AP Syria and Israel signed a U Snegotiated pact today to si lence the guns on the Golan Heights front The pact also commits the historic enemies to Their military commands re ported a half hour after the signing that the guns that boomed across the bleak and was signed by the Syrians A conference source said ex clusion of the press after Siilasuvuos opening statement had been previously agreed upon at Syrian request The source said the general seemed to have temporarily forgotten about this when he in wit A yuUlllCU sometimes revealing supposedly barren front for the past 81 days the signing silent AU N spokesman in Geneva gajj ajj signatures were com inc ga a sgnaures subpoenaed tapes of 45 more at am CDT after a caused Syrias apparent reluctance to sign the agreement in the pres ence of newsmen The diengagement accord negotiated by U S Secretary of State Henry A Kissinger in a marathon 33day peace mission was signed by the Israeli rep resentatives at am But the Syrians made no immediate move to sign the documents Lt Gen Ensio Siilasvuo of Finland commander of the XI S Emergency Force who chaired the session announced a 15 minute recess Newsmen were asked to leave the hall of the Palace of Nations the Geneva U N headquarters Shortly afterward the prob lem was cleared up and the pact which Siilasvuo had called a giant and courageous step toward lasting Mideast peace are under fierce bombardment and that tank encounters were Fighting in the past 81 days claimed the lives of 60 Israeli taking place about the time the soldiers and civilians The disengagement pact was being j Syrian casualty toll was not re signed The Israeli command called the fighting heavier than usual but noted that a similar outburst offighting occurred in vited the parties to proceed with I the Sinai peninsula just before the Egyptian ceasefire was ported But flie shooting finally stop ped at am CDT the two sides said SaturdayIsraeli and Syrian military delegations begin five days of talks on the disen gagement timetable and on C T It tooka Syrian Reminder to signed last January Three have the press leavebefore the I raeli soldiers were reported precise demarcationImes for y i thinning out of forces The troop signing process was comwounded today pleted Original plans were to em phasize the U N role by giving maximumpress coverage to the ceremony But this ran into Syrian opposition hours before the meeting for reasons not of ficiall spelled out Observers believed the Syri ans wanted to spare the feelings of radical Palestinians critical of the accord The moodoutside the hall after the press left was describ ed by one source as busi nesslike I have not seen anyone smiling the informant said There wasno general hand shaking Priorto the signing the Tel Aviv and Damascus commands reportedartillery rocket and tank dues along the Golan front The Syrian command had j separation agreement says all its provisions are to be imple mented by June 25 Israel and Syria formally en dorsed the pact Thursday one day after agreement by the ne gotiating teams was announced in Jerusalem and Washington The Syrian enforsement came at a 10hour session of President Hafez Assads ruling socialist Baath party and Israeli ap proval on a 76 to 36 vote in the Knesset or parliament Triumphant Kissinger gets Presidents congratulations Washington AP A tired but triumphant Henry Kissinger returned home today toieceive the congratulations of President Nixon Vice President Gerald R Ford and congres sional leaders on the success of his extraordinary 34day Middle East peace mission Congratulations that may be one of the great things of the century a beaming Kissinger was told by House Speaker Carl Albert DOkla as the secretary opened a detailed briefing for 22 congressional leaders A few hours earlier Syrian Geneva a Kissingernegotiated agreement to separate their warring armies on the Golar Heights After a privae breakfast with Nixon in the White House family IIlc oyilolt UUilllllaJJU pu Av reported that enemy positions I and Israeli generals signed in The Presidents upcoming trip to the Middle East a region scarred by sporadic fighting for more than a quarter century was among the topics being discussed on Kissingers first quarters Kissinger was es1 day back in the United States corted by the President to the Cabinet Room where he re ceived a standing ovation from Ford and the congressional leaders Nixon and Kissinger also were expected to brief the congres sional leaders on plans for the Presidents trips in June to the Middle East and the Soviet Union sources indicated Before flying to Washington Kissinger stopped in Cairo where Egyptian president Anwar Sadat said he had per formed a miracle in bringing about the agreement Sadat also praised the wisdom and far sightedness of President Hafez Assad of Syria and the positive role of the United States   

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