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Southern Illinoisan Newspaper Archive: April 14, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Southern Illinoisan

Location: Carbondale, Illinois

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   Southern Illinoisan (Newspaper) - April 14, 1974, Carbondale, Illinois                                PUBLICATION OFFICE Murphysboro Htrrin 710 N Illinois 1113 Walnut 212 N Ulb Velumt 8830c Copy Four SectionsComics Family Weekly 2 tabloii ern fflinoisan Hrrln OillK Murphyrtoro SUNDAY APRIL 14 W4 Kissinger Syrian envoy discuss peace in c New York Times Washington A special Syrian emissary discussed detailed proposals for separation from Israeli forces in the Golan Heights with Secy of State Henry H Kissinger Saturday Later Kissinger described the Syrian plan as a constructive attempt to deal with the problem After two hours of talks with Brig Gen Hikmat Kahalil Al Shihabi chief of staff for Syrian military intelligence Kissinger told reporters that the disengagement discussion was very useful and had been conducted in a very friendly very constructive at mosphere The United States will con tinue its efforts to bring the two sides together and continues to consider disengagement between Syrian and Israeli forces the primary objective to be achieved in the Middle East right now Kissinger said He also said he still planned to go to the Middle East for shuttle diplomacy between Damascus and Jerusalem An aide said Kissinger planned to leave in about two weeks Kissinegr the agreed in termediary between Israel and Syria in the disengagement negotiations received a detailed map and proposals from Defense Minister Moshe Dayan of Israel on March 30 He discussed the Israeli ideas with AlShihabi Saturday as well as the Syrian envoys own map and proposals The Syrian delegation arrived in Washington on Wednesday and hadpreliminary talks with American officials prior to Kissingers first meeting with Gen AlShihabi Friday night during a working dinner given by his top Middle East aide Joseph J Sisco The talks have taken place amidst a growing military buildup in the Golan Heights area The two sides have shelled each other for 33 consecutive days Israeli planes attack Syrians New York Times News Service And Associated Press Israeli warplanes went into action Saturday on the Syrian of the Golan truce line for the first time since the October Syria claimed three of the planes were shot down but Israel said no planes were tit The Israeli fighters took to the skies only hours after Israeli ground forces raided six villages in southern Lebanon in retalia tion for the terrorist attack on Qiryat Shmonah on Thursday A Lebanese woman and her daughter were reported killed in the raid About dusk Saturday Israeli artillery opened fire on suspected concentrations of saboteurs in southern Lebanon Villagers in the region said two towns were shelled intermit tently for 45 minutes No casualties were reported Earlier two rockets had been fired into Israeli territory from inside Lebanon In the air action the Tel Aviv command said its planes strafed Syrian troops trying to cross the ceasefire line at Mt Hermon and bombed Syrian positions providing cover for the at tackers The Israeli command previously admitted using warplanes to fire at Syrians crossing into Israeli held ter ritory but Saturdays report was the first time since the October war that Israel said it had planes operating over Syrianheld territory The air action followed tank and artillery fighting on the Golan Heights and Mt Hermon A military spokesman in Damascus said several Israeli soldiers were killed or wounded in the fighting Biggest Day The Israeli command said nothing of casualties but a knowledgeable military source said Today was the biggest day of activity with Syria since ttie war In the threehour Israeli raid into Lebanon Friday night 24 houses and a power station were blown up and two persons were killed and 13 taken captive the Lebanese Defense Ministry said The Israeli command in Tel Aviv said its commandos blew up at least 20 houses and took 10 persons captive before returning to Israel It said the strike force was ordered to evacuate the houses before blowing them up Moshe Dayan said the Israeli But in the village of Muhabeib a woman and her daughter were found dead in the nibble of one raiders were careful not to harm Lebanese civilians and any deaths were unintentional rlOj DOM of the buildings To call attention to the deaths saJQ 0 the villagers refused to bury the j Lebanon has requested an two bodies defying the Moslem Security Council meeting tmffllWIUnCf tvlP nftHfl tU WA vnnntinrf A United Nations spokesman Saturday night that When the weather gets this one to keep small bays warm enough in spring it from playing baseball The takes more than a fence like small boys in the picture happen to live in Kansas City Mo but it might as well be Anywhere USA code requiring burial of the dead within 24 hours The villages hit by the Israelis are 10 to 15 miles west of Qiryat Shmona in a border area that the Israelis occupied with armored infantry in September 1972 when the Lebanese army and Palestinian guerrillas resisted No Resistance This time press reports from the area said there had been no the Lebanese to discuss the raid No meeting time has been announced of ficially but some members of the council said they have been told it would begin Monday afternoon United States Pressure Several UN sources said the United States had pressured Lebanon not to ask for the session fearing a debate would upset Secretary of State Henry A Kissingers IsraeliSyrian disengagement tgalks UN SecretaryGeneral Kurt Waldheim said he deeply resistance by security forces These reports said that villagers were demanding pro tection and efforts by the deplores the raids which he government to obtain the return i said may adversely affect the Tirav rpnpn a Hist of the captives The reports said the Israelis had told the villagers the men would be held as hostages until Lebanon returns two Israeli pilots who were captured Mon day after their Phantom fighter bomber crashed Lebanon Israeli Defense in southern Minister efforts under way to reach a just and lasting settlement in the Middle East Dayan warned the Lebanese The three incumbents were reelected to serve on the board of trustees at John A Logan College Carterville Richard Hunter of Carbondale received the most votes with 4617 Jerome Alongi of Du Charles Reno David Rosenthal operating from its territory Israel would raid southern Lebanon until the area would have to be abandoned On Carbondale High board Hindersman Walker AAcDermott Grade board seats Reno Rosenthal win in Charles Reno 30 and David Rosenthal 33 won seats Satur day on the Carbondale Elemen An incumbent and two new comers were elected to the Car bondale Community High School District 165 Board of Education Saturday Carol McDermott of 1105 W Jefferson St Carbondale an instructor in the social welfare department at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale re ceived the most votes with 2009 Incumbent Charles Hinders man 48 of 101 N Lark Lane Dean of the College of Business Administration at SIU received 1954 votes Mary Walker 44 of 10H7 N Oakland the former ombuds man at SIUC received 1369 votes William Coracy 47 and Ro bert Artiz 50 were defeated with votes of 1167 and 464 res pectively Collective bargaining curri culum and good quality teach ers were the primary issues Of the school board candidates tary School District 95 Board of Education Both men opposed the rein statement of the Comprehensive School Mathematics Program Reno is owner of Renos News Agency in Rosenthalis a certified public accountant Defeated were Karen Lan Carol McDermott Mary Walker Carterville Voters in the Carterville Unit School District 5 elected new comers Earl Halterman and Lawrence Woolard to the Board of Education according to Jer ald Cuendet Carterville super intendent of education Official totals from the elec tion were unavailable Charles Hindersman Flatts Bob Henry was reelected in caucus Saturday at Flatts man favored CSMP Mrs Lan Chester said she would like to see CSMP evaluated education ally Rosenthal said he did not think CSMP should be an issue in the school board race because he issatisfied with the districts math comimttees recommenda tion to adopt another program Reno said the boards deci sion to remove CSMP from tne schools should stand because the peoplehave spoken out against the program through the teach Chester 40 a homemaker anders Lawrence Weisman 43 an as1 Theunofficial vote totals were sistant professor of occupational Reno 1322 Rosenthal 1268 education at Southern Illinois j Lanchester 1037 and Weisman University at Carbondale Weisj826 Diplomat recovers c New York Times Buenos Aires Alfred A Laun the American diplomat shot and briefly kid Service branch in Cordoba wa shot and dragged from his suburban home on Friday morning by nine members of the Peoples R e v o 1 u t i on a r y Logan College incumbents win Quoin received 4274 votesand Clifford Batteau of Elkville re ceived 3978 votes Bruce Fine of Carterville re ceived 2314 votes and James Fiorino of Du Quoin received 1977 votes Mother Earth News in todays paper School near Benton1 Henry was i 430 miles northwest of here the only candidate running and Laun36 tiie head of he received nine votes United States Inform napped by Marxist guerrillas Cordoba was reported Saturday Army to be recovering from hisj Apparently because of tiiej wounds in a clinic in that city Living on the land Better yet living with the lend Growing your own food Making yourown furniture Building your own house Camping Bicycling Canoe ing Raising animals All the things that mother never told you the Mother Earth News will Starting today the Southern Illinoisan will feature the Mother Earth News a new column that will show you how to get moreout of life to reach out for something better than the 9 to 5 routine and the crowding and pushing of todays fastpaced life Doing more with less is Mothers goal How to do it is Mothers message Mother is really John Shut tleworfc 35 born on an In diana farm who believes that nature holds the answers to the good life Mother writes about a dif fferent subject every week so whether youre interested in building a log cabin in the woods or just want to see your organic garden grow youll find specific instructions in the column that will ap pear in the Family Living sec tion on Sundays The Mother Earth News will help you and your family breathe free walk tall and love life We think youll find a new friend in Mother Shes waiting on Page 14 head of the Steel industry acts to end discrimination TYiii nn hfthi c New York Times Washington Labor and management in the steel industry after long negotiation with the federal government have adopted an unprecedented voluntary na tionwide plan to end racial and sex discrimination in employ ment practices sources close to the negotiations disclosed Saturday The plan to be disclosed Monday will reportedly require the steel companies to give millions of dollars in back pay to victims of past discrimina tion The program will also create a plantwide seniority systems in the nations steel mills to eliminate the effects of the long standing practice in many com panies of keeping minority workers in lower paying dirtier jobs The steel agreement between the United Steelworkers of America and most of the major steel companies will im mediately affect 40000 to 50000 black Spanishsurnamed and women workers hired before Jan 1 1968 the sources said Even before the plan is made public it has been sharply at tacked by Herbert Hill the na tional labor director of the Na tional Association for the Advancement of Colored People which has been seeking for 20 years to end racial discrimina tion inthe steel industry Hill objected to provisions that would require all workers receiving back pay to sign a waiver stating they would not sue the company or union at any time for damages suffered as a result of infringement of their civil rights Even if a worker declines the back pay and files suit against the industry the Department of Justice would be required under circumstances stipulated in plan to intervene on behalf of the steel companies and union against the worker filing the complaint Hill also complained that the back pay that will be made under the voluntary program is insufficient and below what would be ordered by a court The plan calls for back pay ranging from a minium of toa maximum of per worker with aa average pay ment estimated at about For the industry as a whole these payments would aggregate million to million depen ding on the number of workers who receive seriousness of his wounds thej guerrillas released him Friday i night The diplomat was found u Information I wrapped in a blanket and lying between two trucks by a riverbed near the city center Police officials said there were serum bottles attached to his body indicating that he had received medical treatment from his captors cloudy and cooler to daywith showers and thund erstorms likely Highsin the 60s Tonight partly cloudy and cooler Lows in the lower or mid 40s Monday mostly sunny and cool Highs in the lower of mid 60s Chance of precipitation 60 per centto day Inside today A GOODTEACHER is diffi cult to definebut Suzanne Hanney has gathered an ar ray of opinions from adminis trators teachers and students on Page 18 KAPPAS AT WARFor Good Times is this years theme for the Kappa Carnival Story by Linda English on Page 2A MARGIE RUTH JONES considers the Angel Derby far from being powderpuffish Story by Sam Denoms on Page 3A BASEBALL SALUKIS won 10th and llth in row by iden tical 41 scores over Univer sity of Louisville Page 7 PREP RECRUITING battle rages in area and throughout the country Pages 7 and 10 TRACK SALUKIS scuttle University of Illinois Page 8 JIM BOKELMANN in near nohitter for SIUC Page 9 INDEX Ann Landers MA Bridge A Business 2122 Byline BG 2 Classified 272J Crossword 4A Editorials 20 Family Living 315 Finance 2324 Records S Sports 711 Television 1HA Weather details map I   

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