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Southern Illinoisan: Tuesday, January 29, 1974 - Page 1

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   Southern Illinoisan (Newspaper) - January 29, 1974, Carbondale, Illinois                                PUBLICATION OFFICE 710 N Murphysboro 1113 Walnu Herrin 212 N 16th Volume a Copy Southern oisan 010175 IM LIBRARY LS NEWSPAPERSBOX 39 DECATUR ILL 62523 2 Sections 40 Pajjw y WcmortoCrbomtl Froi Hrrln Dtly JournalMurpHyoboro ImtoptldMt TUESDAY JANUARY 29 1974 CarbondileHwrinMurphysbori The beautiful people arrive at Madison Square Garden for AliFrazier fight Ali evens up the score AP Wirephoto By Dave Anderson c New York Times New York In another 12 rounds that was virtually a continuation of their 1971 masterpiece Muhammad Ali was awarded a unanimous decision over Joe Frazier at Madison Square Garden Monday night before a glamourous gathering of 20748 spectators who created a nontitle indoor record gate of With his triumph Ali evened his series Frazier the winner by a unanimous 15round decision nearly three years ago Each of the former heavy weight champions looked ahead to a third fight with Ali saying Im not going to duck Joe Im going to give Joe all the chances he wants Frazier said I want him again One more time Jack Gordon one of the judges had Ali ahead 8 rounds to 4 on his scorecard Tony Fight pictures on page 15 Unlike his attitude in the 1971 bout Ali did not clown or at tempt tominimize the strength of Fraziers punches At the instructions in midring from referee Tony Perez Ali appeared to avoid looking at Frazier who stared firmly at him Ali even looked away and winked twice at the ringside spectators At the bell Frazier moved quickly across the blue canvas ring forcing Ali to retreat momentarily against the ropes The pattern appeared identical to their 1971 first fight with Frazier the aggressor moving through Alls jab in order to the body In the 10 T UU HIS BULU i J Castellano another judge had it land his powerful left hooks Al 74 with one even Referee Tony Perez had Ali ahead 651 Ali justified his role as a 7to5 betting favorite with a flurry 1Vuuu jabs and occasional right punch a hard hook into Alis that prevented Frazier from right rib cage Ali often moved into a flat footed stance throwing a hard right hand But late in the Frazier continued to corner Ali against the ropes and work on fifth Ali resumed hanging on Frazier in t h e clinches When they came out of one of them Frazier landed a left hook that stung but Ali escaped from a corner When the clinching continued boos began in the crowd as Frazier complained to Perez about his opponents continual holding In the sixth Ali landed a sharp jab but Frazier shrugged it off and dug a left hook into Alis midsection For the first time Ali went into his old dance routine moving quickly to his left away from Fraziers hook Early in the seventh Frazier smashed a left hook against Alis jaw Moments later he scored again with the same punch and Ali was content to cover up then move away All was unable to keep Frazier Nixon prodding Senate for action right hand But late in tne awav wjth his jab round Frazier landed the best dominating the tempo Alis right hand has a painful bursitis condition in the middle knuckle but he used it to regis ter perhaps his best punch a straight right to Fraziers jaw late in the second round Wob bling slightly Frazier retreated to the ropes but the referee leaped between the gladia tors Afforded a moments rest Frazier easily finished the round which ended perhaps 10 seconds later Moments after the second landing iwuiimu round started the 3flyearold spectators shouting Frazier swarmed after Ali near was flicking his jab but the ropes but his 32yearold op ponent escaped landed another solid left hook this time to the throat Alis jab occa sionally was as auick as ever but often he missed fighters permitting Frazier a jabs Moments later Ali began momentary rest to bleer from the left nostril but Earlv in the fourth round soon Ali began to score more Often with his jabs as Frazier looked for an opening to land a left hook to the head Near the end of the ninth the crowd resumed chanting Ali Ali and the noise appeared to inspire him In the tenth Frasier openec with another solid left hook thai spun the perspiration off Alis face Moments later he landed another Alis right cheek ap peared to be cut but there was hardly any flow of blood although blood appeared to be seeping from his nose again Fraziers lumpy face had begun to puff by now parti cularly around the eyes But at the bell ending the 10th Frazier landedanother solid left hook to the jaw In the lith Frazier landed a leftright combination but then missed a few wild left hooks as Ali peppered his puffy face with jabs When the final round began Fraziers fury was obvious as he swung wildly with his left hook Ali continued to retreat occa sionally landing a few jabs but Frazier continued to be the ag gressor Frazier appeared desperate stumbling afterAli as the final seconds ticked ssured him against the ropes fanding two hard ieft hooks that ting DUC HOI following it as Frazier moved under it repeatedly to attack Alis body Just before the eighth round ended Frazier landed a hard overhand right to Alis jaw Late in the round Ali stagperhaps the best punch of the gered Frazier with a powerful fight right hand but as Frazier retreated against the ropes Perez moved between the In the ninth Frazier again moved out quickly punching through Alis weak and wild Surplus reported 15 million jobs created by increase in trade us WORLD Washington AP If government estimates are correct an increase in U S trade last year created 15 million jobs The Commerce Department reported Monday that the United States had a surplus in its foreign trade in 1973 of nomic affairs said the biggest factors in the improved U S away 55 mph limit endorsed Springfield AP The Senate Transportation Committee approved today a plan to reduce the states max imum speed limit to 55 miles per hour and punish drivers who exceedit with a fine and a moving violation The vote was 86 after a lively hearing punctuated with shouted exchanges between law makers A singleday Assembly session was scheduled to consider By David C Martin Washington AP president Nixon today verbally proddedthe Senate to give him the power to initiate gasoline rationing Senate Minority Leader Hugh Scott said Nixon sent a letter to Capitol Hill urging the Senate to reconcile with the House the differences between the two bodies over emergency energy legislation Scott said Nixons letter backed a motion to recommit the bill to conference with the HouseThe motion is expected to be offered later in the day by Sen Gaylord Nelson D Wisc Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield said he still planned to vote against the motion to recommit but Senate Interior chairman Henry M Jackson D Wash who last week flatly predicted passage of the bill said today he could no longer forecast the outcome Nixon will get order to fesfify Los Angeles AP A California judge said today he will order President Nixon to testify in person for the de fense of John Ehrlichman in the Ellsberg burglar case Superior Court Judge Gordon Ringer said it will be the first time in US history that a state court judge has taken such ac tion Ehrlichmans attorney Doug las Dalton said a decision was made to subpoena the President after White House attorney James St Clair re jected a request to have Nixon appear voluntarily Ehrlichman and codefendants G Gordon Liddy and David R Young Jr are charged with conspiracy and burglary in the Labor Day 1971 breakin at the Beverly Hills offices of Dr Lewis Fielding The Times said Ehrlichman who resigned last April hopes to use the Presidents testimony to reinforce the contention he and his codefendants were ac ting as law enforcement officers during the breakin Nixon asks highlevel pay raises Washington AP Pay raises of 7 per cent that exceed Cost of Living Council guidelines are in store for high level public servants under President Nixons fiscal 1975 budget proposal Once formally proposed the pay raises for congressmen Cabinet members and toplevel federal administrators are likely to begin in March with addi tional increments in 1975 and 1976 The only action that could stop Nixons intent is a negative vote by Congress within 30 days after the proposal reaches CapitolHill Urges conference sessions on emergency energy bills Nelsons motion is expected to include instructions to drop a controversial provision designed to prevent the oil industry from earning windfall profits Jackson blamed the effort to block the bill on intensive lob bying by the petroleum indus try and the White House against the windfall profits provision The industry and the admini stration reportedly organized a filibuster in December by Republicans and oilstate sena tors that prevented passage of the bill then The bills opponents gamed new strength Monday when Nelson a northern liberal known to favor a windfall profits tax announced his opposition to the bill on the grounds that it is unworkable Nelson also objects to provisions in the bill that would suspend clean air re quirements in order to permit toe burning of dirtier fuels Elsewhere on Capitol Hill John Sawhill deputy director of the Federal Energy Office said the price of domestic oil should be held within the range of to a barrel He said that otherwise the price of domestic oil will con tinue to creep toward that set by the Arab oil nations Federal energy chief William E Simon also appearing before a unit of the Senate Government Operations Committee predicted that the country could handle a 15 per cent gasoline shortage without rationing Simon promised to provide adequate advance notice if ra tioning becomes necessary Meanwhile Supreme Court Justice William 0 Douglas ac cused the oil companies of creating the energy crisis for their own profitwith the cooperation of governmental bureaucracy Speaking at the University of Mississippi Douglas said Our problem is a fuel monopoly The oil industry keeps the supply of oil and gas low enough to boost prices and makes sure all other energy sources are on the bot tom In another development the Atomic Energy Commission said it is changing its procedures for licensing nuclear power plants in an effort to shorten the time needed to put such plants into operation Cincinnati Ohio AP James Earl Ray 41 confessed slayer of civil rights leader Dr Martin Luther King Jr won a review of his guilty plea from Rays plea to be reviewed of Ray by Percy Foreman then his attorney The letters revealed arrange ments for Foreman to receive from royalties on publication and movies based on Rays case Also the letters ra the 6th U S Circuit Court Anneals today Kay s taae The appellate court in a 2lj dicated that Rays share of the decision remanded Rays peti money would be delivered only tionfor a review to the U S on his plea of with no District Tenn Court in Nashville eim The appeals court accepted Rays contention that he was given improper legal advice to Star Chambers Uii jJiwe v embarassing circumstances to take place in the court room Ray is serving a 99year sentence in the Tennessee state penitentiary for the April 41968 slaying of King in Memphis Rays appeal alleged that at torney Arthur Hanes and later Foreman were more interested in funds to be derived from articles and books planned by Alabama author William Brad ford Huie than in his defense Ray further alleged that his own guilty plea was paramount to the financial success of the publications and a possible movie based on his case Derge blasts Faculty Senate tor closed meeting request laciors in LUC mipiuvcu trade position were the two legislation designed to bring IT devaluations of the dollar These made U S goods cheaper over seas and foreign goods more expensive in this country But Jones said the U S trade surplus may be shortlived He said the higher cost of world oil loreign uuiuc 11 vr the h gher cost of woria oil billion the first trade surplus m offset other y fhrpp vparfi IniA IS71 1572 4 I three years Exports totaled billion a 44 per cent increase over 1972 The Commerce Department said nearly half this gain was in agricultural exports Imports totaled billion a 24 per cent increase over 1972 and the cost of petroleum im ports were up by billion over the previous year The government estimates that each billion in U S ex port trade leads to 72000 new jobs which would mean an in crease in employment last year by 15 million Sidney L Jones assistant secretary of commerce for eco S trade gains and lead to renewed deficits in 1974 In addition to reporting the 4973 trade surplus the Com merce Department also said Monday that the United States had a record monthly trade surplus of million in December The previous single monthly record was S878 million in March of 1965 Imports during December were off by 11 1 per cent com pared with November while exports rose 16 per cent linois into compliance with federal directive calling for a 55 mph speed limit in all states to conserve energy There was agreement among senators that the limit should be reduced but heated argument on the penalty that should be assessed for violations Bolivia under martial law La Paz Bolivia AP Bolivia was under near martial law today and Presi dent Hugo Banzer claimed that a leftist conspiracy was trying to overthrow his rightist mili tary government Banzer proclaimed a state of siege one step short of martial tpOILa lUat iu yci Lent u Virtually all categories of im1 law Monday night as morepan i i I HH rtnn KlnnlraH Oil ports except for petroleum were off sharply in Decem ber 10000 peasants blocked all three roads from agricultural areas in southern and eastern Bolivia CLOUDY By Dave Butler Of The Southern Illinoisan David R Derge president of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale Monday blasted the Faculty Senate for asking the SIU Board of Trustees to hold closed meetings to consider charges against Derge and the administration Speaking at a press confer enc he called the possible meetings secret trials and said they used to be called Star Chambers Derge added that since then individual rights have been as sured saying some people evj en have heard of the Bill of Rights Derges comments were in re sponse to questions over the Faculty Senate action censuring the administration and asking for its replacement Derge said the administration will work with the Senate if they indeed want to work He added there still is a whole list of advice and recommenda tions that we want from them Last August Derge said one of the 10 crucial priorities for SIUC was to work more closely with the senate When asked Monday if the administration is trying to work with the sen ate Derge said he has not been contacted by the senate since the censure motion was approv ed in early January Small car use urged Derge also said he is not sure if the senate will be given an opportunity to present evidence against the administration at the boards Feb 14 meeting in Edwardsville When asked if he wants the meeting open to the public Derge said its entirely up to the senate and the board But I havent seen agenda and dont He added the board know exactly what theyre go ing to do The faculty senate requested earlier that the evidence be pre sented to the board in closed board is becoming too involved in internal campus administra tion Derge said I think yeu should ask the board When asked again how he feels about the boards involve ment in internal campus mat ters Derge again said I think you should askttie board He also said it is too early to determine if there are any problems with the new adminis trative setup Last week Derge declined to sign a student government peri tion asking Gov Daniel Walker to oppose an increase in tuition bcHLcU ItJ uuax w i v session and without Derge preat state universitites At that sent The senate action is critijtime Derge said the new setup cal of administrative handling forbids him from being involved of recent budget cutbacks in state matters or working with Derge declined to answer questions concerning an admini strative realignment of top SIU administrators The board has given Chief of Board Staff Jam es M Brown some direct au thority over Derge and Ed wardsville campus president John S Rendleman When asked if he thinks the Exfra state agencies Both Rendleman and Brown signed the petition Derge said Monday the incident is an exam ple of possible problems of in terpretation of the new guide lines Both Brown and Rendle man said they see no reason why Derge could not sign the petition SIUC workstudy program gets boost by Derge Tonight mostly cloudy with lows in the 40s Wednesday partly cloudy Highs around 50 A dry period with a warm ing trend Thursday through Saturday Cold Thursday but gradually becoming warmer Friday and Saturday INDEX Banking Section Classified Comics TV Bridge Crossword Editorials Family living Records Sports Weather details map Youth 911 27 4 6 12 1516 12 5 Every1 university president should drive a small car ac cording to David R Derge president of Southern Illinois University of Carbondale Derge said Monday he would like to see state univer sity presidents trade their Cadillacs for economical Mav ericks Derge who traded his uni verityowned Oldsmobile 98 luxury sedan for a leased Maverick as an experiment said the smaller car isnt too bad He added that the car rides better since he lost weight And Derge added that maybe person in state gov ernment should try it too Southern Illinois University at Carbondale has received an additional from the federal government for its workstudies program a move that will mean up to 200 new student jobs Frank C Adams director of student work and financial assistance said the money will boost the total number of students working to 3200 The money Adams said will be used mostly for jobs for students from low and middle income families He urged any student interest ed in getting an oncampus job to contact the student work office immediately Students on the program are paid per hour and work from 15 to 20 hours per week Adams said He added that depending on the job and length of service some stu dents are paid more and work longer hours The university received in federal money at the start of the current school year Adams said that amount was down from previous years SIUC put nearly million in state money into the work program he said The additional should help enrollment Adams said Enrollment is contingent to help gifts grants loans and the work program Adams said Speaking at a press confer ence SIUC President David R Derge said the additional money is something awfully good Adams also said the addir tional money will allow the university to increase number of hours some stu dents are working   

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