Alton Telegraph, November 26, 1999

Alton Telegraph

November 26, 1999

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Issue date: Friday, November 26, 1999

Pages available: 112

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Publication name: Alton Telegraph

Location: Alton, Illinois

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Alton Telegraph (Newspaper) - November 26, 1999, Alton, Illinois SERVING THE RIVER BEND SINCE 1836 TELEGRAPH Alton Acres Community Center helps feed needy Page ClVol. 164, No. 315 - 50 cents Keeping up with Jones Rams linebacker is finding the end zone Page Bl The outlook Partly cloudy and cool. High ' 54 ; low 36 Page CIO Friday, November 26,1999 em Biune Some ideas for family, friends Special Section www.thetelegraph.com Peeling car paint draws suits ^ A    hptivppn    1995    ar By DENNIS GRUBAUGH Telegraph staff writer EDWARDSVILLE - A pair of lawsuits motoring through state and federal courts arc aimed at exposing the allegedly faulty paint process used for years on Chrysler and Ford vehicles. In one suit, a Moro woman, Christina Marie Sanneman. is trying to show that the peeling Two area women seek class action efforts paint on her 1990 Plymouth Voyager minivan is indicative of problems suffered by several drivers of Chrysler Corp. products made between 1988 and 1994. In the second suit, a Bethalto woman, Joyce Elaine Phillips, claims that similar faulty paint work has affected her 1990 Ford Taurus and tens of thousands of other Ford products produced between 1985 and 1997. The common local link in both cases is the Lakin Law Firm in Wood River, which is cooperating withChicago attor ney Paul Weiss in pursuing class action status for the lawsuits in two jurisdictions. The Ford Motor Co. suit is the most recent of the two and was filed last month in Madison County Circuit Court Attorney Brad Lakin said Phillips seeks to represent thousands of Ford owners who bought Ford vehicles and allegedly were never told that a paint system adopted in 1983 would cause thousands of vehicles to exhibit a paint defect known as “delamination," which appears as peeling paint. Ford changed paint processes between 1995 and 1997, he said. “This was a situation where a company put profits over the interests of its customers,** Lakin said. “Internal company documents tell us the company knew this paint process, which had a limited warranty, was defective.” The suit alleges that Ford, ■ See SUITS, Page A9Volunteers share with needy for ThanksgivingAll ages come together to lend hand ____________    The    Telegraph/RUSS    SMITH Bethalto, to help put together Thanksgiving dinners. By ANDE YAKSTIS Telegraph staff writer COTTAGE HILLS - Jamie and Sandy Hutchins and their children helped needy families have a happy Thanksgiving Thursday with turkey and all the trimmings from Community Hope Center. “Our family is sharing our holiday with hungry people to help them have a Thanksgiving dinner,” said Sandy Hutchins of Bethalto. The couple and their children — Christie, ll, Tyler, 6, and Cole, ll months - joined dozens of volunteers who delivered turkey dinners from Community Hope Center to older folks living alone, disabled people and young families who are out of work “We’re fixing Thanksgiving dinners for hungry families,” said Christie Hutchins, a student at the Sixth Grade Center in Bethalto. The aroma of freshly cooked turkey, mashed potatoes and pumpkin pies drifted through the kitchen at Hope Center in Cottage Hills. “Our volunteers are delivering turkey dinners and all the trimmings to 220 needy people of all ages," said Barbara Thomas, the dinner i coordinator, who scooped a big helping of potatoes into a container. Steelworkers, teachers, 1 lawyers, children and housewives were among the volunteers who carried dinners to * j apartments and homes of older people living alone on fixed incomes. “Many older folks are paying for expensive medical prescriptions and can’t afford a Thanksgiving dinner,” said Crystal Davis, director of Hope Center. Methodists, Catholics, ■ See VOLUNTEERS, Page A9 Community Christmas embodies spirit of giving ■ Last year, the program collected almost $2,700 in cash and $12,000 in donated items By VICKI BENNINGTON For The Telegraph Community Christmas participants and supporters think giving is better than getting at Christmas. Businesses and individuals are joining together to help make someone’s Christmas a little happier, as they have been doing for the past IO years. “We want to redo what we did before,” said Glenda Arnett, AFL-CIO community services liaison with United Way Partnership. “Past years have been very successful.” Last year, the program collected almost $2,700 in cash and $12,000 in donated items. “The good thing is that IOO percent of donations and cash go directly to the I See GIVING, Page A9 Good Morning I Area/Illinois.......A3-10 Bulletin Board........A7 Classifieds ..........C4 Comics.............87 Editorial.............A4 Horoscope ..........87 Nation/world.........C4 Obituaries...........AB Bahr, Coyle, Dickerson, Quinn, Roady, Szegedy, Werner, Westerhold, Wood Scoreboard..........C2 Television ...........B6 Weather............CIO _ The Telegraph/MARGIE M. BARNES Unusually dry conditions led to this recent fire in a farm field near Eldred, battled by firefighters from the Eldred and Carrollton volunteer fire departments. Fire officials said dry dust often catches fire on truck and farm mach.nery equip-ment, which can ignite parched crops. Dry weather hurting some farmers By THOMAS WRAUSMANN Telegraph staff writer The extremely dry and warm weather this harvest season has been devastating to some farmers, but, strangely enough, it has had virtually no affect on others. Others producing great yields “It’S so spotty,” said down by much, Moore said. Medora farmer Dan Moore, a Jersey County Board member. Despite unusually dry conditions the last several months, overall grain yields are not “It’s not a total disaster,” he said. “It just depends on where you’re at. Just two miles down the road makes the biggest difference.” The agricultural activist said some farmers have had fields with great yields, while others have unfortunately had basically zero yi'elds because of unusually dry conditions. He said it varies literally from ■ See FARMERS, Page A9 ;

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