Friday, July 30, 1999

Alton Telegraph

Location: Alton, Illinois

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Alton Telegraph (Newspaper) - July 30, 1999, Alton, Illinois SERVING THE RIVER BEND SINCE 1836 THE Road to freedom Tour selected as part of national **** mt J Page IM Penalty Imposed Clinton ordered to pay $90,000 in Jones case Page A-10 All-Area Baseball Tigers’ Seibert named playa* of year Page B-l Vol. 164, No. 196 — 50 cents Friday, July 30,1999 www.thetelegraph.com Belle security guard missing I'or Alton firefighter By CORY PITT and KERRY SMITH Telegraph staff writers WOOD RIVER — Rescue workers searched the Mississippi River and its banks Thursday for a longtime Alton firefighter who disappeared in the predawn hours from his second job as a security guard at the old Alton Belle Casino. The search for Charlie Roades, 50, of Alton, focused on the area around Mike’s Marine Inc., near the intersection of Illinois Routes 3 and 143 in Wood River, across the Berm Highway from the EnviroTech business park and downstream from the Melvin Price Locks and Dam. The search was suspended Thursday night and was to resume this morning, authorities saith________ ■ See MISSING, Page A-11 Roades TheTelegraph/JOHN BADMAN Wood River Police Chiel Jim Schneider end Deputy Police Chief Williem Webber, center, joined more than a dozen spewers looking tor Alton Belle security guard Charlie Roades Thursday as towboats were moved away from the dock at Mike s Marine Inc. in Wood River. Right, a St. Louis police helicopter pilot leans out his open door as he Joins the search. More photos, Page C-1 Investor kills 12, then himself Wife, two children found beaten to death after shooting spree at offices ATLANTA (AP) - An investor upset over stock trading losses opened fire Thursday in two brokerage offices, killing nine people and wounding 12 others before escaping. He later killed himself when stopped by police. Earlier, the gunman’s wife and two children were found beaten to death in their suburban home Barton Mayor Bill Campbell said the gunman, Mark O. Barton, 44, committed suicide after police cornered him in a dark green van at a service station in Atlanta’s northern suburbs about five hours after the office shootings. “He was pulled over, and then killed himself.” Two weapons were found at the scene and notes were found with the family mem bers’ bodies, he said. It was among the worst office massacres ever. Campbell said several witnesses at the office buildings recognized the gunman as Barton. Roadblocks went up after the 3 p.m. shootings, and SWAT teams fanned through the complex of offices searching for him. “Ifs a terrible tragedy for our city,” Campbell said. “Our prayers go out to the victims." Barton, a chemist, walked into a brokerage office at Securities Center in the upscale Buckhead section north of downtown Atlanta about 3 p.m., opened fire, then walked across the street and began shooting at another brokerage firm, the mayor said. Four of the victims were killed in one building and five in the other, shot with 9 mm and .45-caliber handguns, Campbell said. Seven of the injured were in ■ See SPREE, Page A-11 The Telegraph/MARGIE M. BARNES Shane Siemans, of the Allegiance Elite Drum & Bugle Corps from Calgary, Alberta, keeps his concentration Thursday despite the heat during practice before the Drum and Brass Review at Public School Stadium in Alton. Music fills air at Drum and Brass Review By ANGELA MUELLER Telegraph staff writer 'ALTON — Streams of music flowed from silver bugles Thursday night at West Middle School’s Public School Stadium, sharpened by the rifling accompaniment of drums and assorted percussion. More than 800 youths in seven drum and bugle corps from across the United State? and Canada took the field on a night when temperatures peaked well above 90 degrees to combine music, drama and dance in the 1999 Alton Drum and Brass Review. The Glassmen of Toledo, Ohio, carried away the night’s honors, receiving the gold medal for their performance of “Empire of Gold: The Music of Zoltan Kodaly.” The silver medal went to the Colts of Dubuque, Iowa, and the bronze to the Crossmen of Newark, Del. Other placings were as follows: fourth, Carolina Crown of Fort Mill, S.C.; fifth, the Troopers of Casper, Wyo.; sixth, Blue Stars of La Crosse, Wis.; seventh, Allegiance Elite of Calgary, Alberta. The seven competing corps portrayed characters and scenes as widely varied as Czar Ivan the Terribles reign in Russia to Billy the Kid’s exploits in the Wild West. Flags were waved, and rifles and swords were thrown high in time to music, which ranged from slow and melodic to intense and severe. See MUSIC, Page A-11 Good Morning Area/Illinois . .A-3-9 Bulletin Board .A-6 Business D-1 Classifieds ... .C-6 Comics D-5 Editorial ......A-4 Horoscope D-5 Nation/world .. .A-10,12 Obituaries.....A-5 Coleman, Kassing, Klaus, Nibert, To, Williams, Yakos Scoreboard----B-2 Stocks........D-2 Television D-7 Weather.......D-8   ——i— Equilon seeks to test soil for diesel fuel By KERRY SMITH Telegraph staff writer SOUTH ROXANA - About 80 residents living in the southeast portion of Roxana have received notices from Equilon Enterprises LLC asking to take soil samples from their homes. The nearby oil refinery’s request stems from a release of diesel fuel July 2, 1998, from a unit at the Wood River Refining Co. In late August, once permission slips have been signed and returned by residents participating in the random sampling, Equilon’s contractor, St. Louis-based URS Greiner Woodward Clyde, will dig a 3-inch-by-6-inch topsoil sample to make sure no diesel remnants remain. Last summer’s diesel spray, said Equilon spokeswoman Melissa Ritter., was caused by an early-morning malfunction in the plant’s distillate hydrotreater, or DHT, unit. A pressure relieve valve popped, and diesel product began spraying, Ritter said. “Right away, we were aware of the malfunction and that it had impacted the community. At 7 a.m., we went door-to-door to South Roxana resi dents, alerting them to had happened. We also compensated residents in several ways for damage to their gardens, diesel on top of their cars and other effects.” About 120 South Roxana homes were affected by the spray, most of them within a 10-block area south of the refinery from Sinclair Avenue ■ See SOIL, Page A-11 "V'f