Monday, June 21, 1999

Alton Telegraph

Location: Alton, Illinois

Page: 1

Other pages in this edition:

Who (or what) are you looking for?

Find old articles about anyone, in the World’s Largest Newspaper Archive!

Other Newspapers from Alton, Illinois

Loading...

Other Editions from Monday, June 21, 1999

Loading...

Text Content of Page 1 of Alton Telegraph on Monday, June 21, 1999

Alton Telegraph (Newspaper) - June 21, 1999, Alton, Illinois SERVING THE RIVER BEND SINCE 1836 Clit APH mmr- mummrn m mmmmm -mmmm: mrnrnmi -mmm : Getting out of the house Camp provides summer activities Page B-l Vol. 164, No. 157 — 50 cents Youth Soccer Tournament wraps up at Moore Park PageC-l The outlook Partly sunny and warm ; high near 85, low near 68 Page W Monday, June 21,1999 God Bless America Church plans patriotic Wr". musical Page IU www.thetelegraph.com Program weeds out problems Probationers work to clean up the Watershed Nature Center Carlos Cook helps trim weeds by the Watershed Nature Center In Edwardsville. For The Telegraph/MELINDA KIDWELL By PAUL MACKIE Telegraph staff writer EDWARDSVILLE -Outdoor lovers who enjoy the Watershed Nature Center may thank workers in the Madison County Public Service Program. The probationers are working hard to beautify the Edwardsville reserve, which has fallen into a state of relative disrepair recently. “We’re making the trail much more passable,” said Mike Hatscher, coordinator for the program “We had people thank us while we were there. It’s a worthwhile project for all.” Seven workers in the program removed weeds from the paved trail and bridge last week. This week, they plan to remove a tree that has fallen across the trail and will spread wood chips along the unpaved portion of the trail. The improvements will be ■ See PROGRAM. Page A-7 Summerfests help revive the spirit of Wood River By ANDE YAKSTIS Telegraph staff writer WOOD RIVER — Townspeople are reviving the spirit of Wood River with lively summerfests on the streets of the historic downtown business district. “We invite everyone to come and see and experience the rich history of Wood River at the summerfests," said Tammy Iskarous of the Wood River Civic Action Body, promoter of the summer festivals. Visitors strolled through historic downtown Wood River on Saturday for the first of a season of summerfests with shopping, music, history, food and crafts. The public festivals will continue in downtown Wood River on the third Saturday of each month — on July 17, Aug. 21 and Sept. 18 — and conclude with the annual Octoberfest on Oct. 16. “We block off streets in downtown for fun, food and entertainment for all ages,” said Iskarous, co-owner of TR’s Cafe at Ferguson and Wood River avenues. Business and property owners of the Wood River Redevelopment Corp. are strong supporters of the summerfests. “They’re promoting wonderful improvements in Wood River,” Iskarous said. Residents are proud of the history of the community, dating back to 1803 when Lewis and Clark camped at Wood River to start their famous exploration of the Northwest Territory. Josiah Vaughn settled on the timber land in 1799 when it was populated by American Indians. “Josiah brought vegetables from ■ See SPIRIT, Page A-7 allgood River VV is full of real American history and we want visitors to see it.” Tammy Iskarous Wood River Civic Action Body COPS targets rural rowdies By SANFORD J. SCHMIDT Telegraph staff writer By STEVE WHITWORTH Telegraph staff writer The Meeting of the Great Rivers National Scenic Byway has generated both controversy and excitement throughout the River Bend during its planning stages; right up until next weekend’s official dedication. But will it generate more tourism and more economic development? The answer is yes, and the benefits are beginning to be felt, says Doug Arnold, president of the Greater Alton/Twin Rivers Convention & Visitors Bureau. “We are seeing continued enthusiasm for what this means for the region,” Arnold said. “And there are real benefits with grants and programs being created.” The National Scenic Byway touches Madison, Jersey and Greene counties, as well as Kampsville in Calhoun County. It includes stretches of highway along both the Mississippi and Illinois rivers between Alton and Kampsville. Arnold admits it may take a few years for the effects of the byway’s designation to be felt fully throughout the area, but he points to concrete developments already. Just last week, Arnold was named as a delegate to the ■ See BYWAY, Page A-7 Area/Illinois......................A-3,6 Bulletin Board.....................A-8 Classifieds...........................C-6 Comics.................................D-2 Editorial................................A-4 Nation/World........................B-4 Obituaries.............................A-5 Alexander, Bowers, Campbell, Drennan, Emery, Godfrey, Goss, Swarringin, Tuthill, Woolsey Scoreboard...........................C-2 Television.............................D-3 Weather................................D-4 Scrambled The Telegraph/MARGIE M. BARNES Left to right, Daniel Davis, 11, of Alhambra, Nathan Gilleland, 9, of Hamel, and Joey Davis, 9, of Alhambra, hang on as they ride the Scrambler Sunday at the Alhambra Sesquicentennial Celebration. The Telegraph/JOHN BADMAN Doug Arnold, president of the Greater Alton/Twin Rivers Convention & Visitors Bureau, says the River Bend is already benefiting from the National Scenic Byway designation. Arnold was recently named a delegate to the Mississippi River Parkway Commission. National Scenic Byway will drive benefits into the area EDWARDSVILLE — Rural roads in Madison County are a little cleaner and a little safer, thanks to a federal program called COPS. The Madison County Sheriff’s Department’s segment of the program was so successful that county officials have decided to pick up the cost of the program, even after the federal money has dried up. “The county is picking up IOO percent of the cost now that the program has proven its worth,” Capt. Bob Hertz said. Two new deputies were hired from the $150,000 in COPS funds given to the Sheriff’s Department, and they have been concentrating on working with township officials in rural townships to address their concerns. “We work with the supervisors and trustees in townships like Pin Oak and Hamel,” Hertz said. One of their chief concerns was large beer parties in secluded areas, attended primarily by rowdy, underage ■ See COPS, Page A-7 limo OA VI/ ^ THURSDAY, June 24 STONEBRAKER