Alton Telegraph, March 2, 1999 : Front Page

Publication: Alton Telegraph March 2, 1999

Alton Telegraph (Newspaper) - March 2, 1999, Alton, Illinois SERVING THE RIVER BEND SINCE 1836 Groomed tor success Personal service, knowledge, a tradition at Sea World Pets Page D-lVol. 164, No. 46 — 50 cents The outlook Cloudy, rain ending early; high near 56, low near 31 Page IM Tuesday, March 2,1999 Hoops action Jersey boys to face Glenwood on the court Page GI wvw^thetelegraphxom Roxana’s schedule will be explained By ANGELA MUELLER Telegraph staff writer ROXANA — Roxana Senior High School administrators and staff will explain a proposed eight-block high school schedule at an open forum to be held at 7 p.m. today in the junior/senior high school aud! torium. After the staff’s presentation, the floor will be opened for questions about the new scheduling system from parents and community members. High school administrators presented the eight-block schedule to the Roxana School Board for consideration last month. Under the proposed schedule, students would take four 85- to 100-minute classes each day with alternating classes on alternating days This schedule would allow students to take eight, rather ■ See PLAN, Page A-7Derelict property on city’s hit list’ New park adream come true Plans unveiled for 40-acre site By ANDE YAKSTIS Telegraph staff writer be knocked down if they are not fixed up Fifteen properties coul By LINDA N. WELLER Telegraph staff writer ALTON — Fifteen more derelict properties could be on the city’s demolition “hit list” if they aren’t fixed up soon. The legal process began last week to force owners to repair their run-down houses or commercial properties under threat of ticketing — and ultimately, demolition. Last Wednesday the City Council unanimously agreed to pursue legal action against the following properties: 645 E. Fifth St., 801 E. Sixth St., 608 E. Eighth St., 708-10 E. Broadway, 329 Dry St., 1919 Gross St., 1616 Joesting Ave., 1837 Market St., 500 Porter St., 1133 Seiler St., 2007 State St., 1335 Taylor Ave., 2624 Yager Ave., 1809 Belle St. and 1822 Belle St. The council’s action allows the city to fine the property owners and file court motions to force demolition. Steve Larson, supervisor of building and housing, said in order for the owners to halt the demolition process, they must post a $1,000 bond with the city until the work is completed The money then is refunded. “The city requires they get the outside of the building presentable within 60 days and the rest of the work has to be done within six months,” Larson said. Notices have been sent to property owners, and more are on the way, Larson said. “They get several notices; they have every opportunity to prevent this," he said of the demolitions. The 15 properties are in bad shape, Larson said. “Some have severe structural damage and are in varying degrees of decrepitude,” he said. “Some are ready to fall down.” Larson said the properties all are unoccupied, and are dangerous, “attractive nuisances." Such properties can be targets of vandalism or arson or can be entered by undesirables. “Some of them have broken windows ■ See DERELICT, Page A-7 GODFREY - The late Robert Glazebrook’s dream to help his town of Godfrey will become a reality in a new 40-acrc park in the heart of town. “Bob loved Godfrey and worked to make it a better community to live,” said his widow, Norma Glazebrook. “Bob’s land will go to the people of Godfrey for a beautiful park." Norma Glazebrook, Godfrey Mayor Michael Campion and Park Director George Bryant unveiled the plans Monday for the Robert E. Glazebrook Community Park on scenic farm land on Stamper Lane. “It’s ideal land with trees and a lake for a park and a recreation complex for the people of Godfrey,” Campion said. Glazebrook, a prominent real estate developer and com- Godfrey Mayor Mike Campion, right, Godfrey Park Director George Bryant and Norma Glazebrook with an artist's drawing of the new Robert E. Glazebrook Community Park off Stamper Lane in Godfrey. munity leader, died on Nov. 20, 1995. Campion foresees the Glazebrook park as a giant step forward for Godfrey to meet the recreation needs of residents into the next century. “The park and recreation complex on the Glazebrook land will be a great asset to the future of Godfrey,” said Campion, who had a vision for a park on the land. “The park will benefit people of all ages and future generations.” Robert Glazebrook’s heart was in Godfrey and the park will help people of the community, his widow said. Norma Glazebrook looked across the property Monday at ■ See PARK, Page A-7 The Telegraph/RUSS SMITH The legal process has started to demolish several derelict houses in Alton, including this one at 608 E. Eighth St. I Good:*': Morning Area/Illinois .....A-3,8 Bulletin Board A-6 Classified.........C-7 Editorial  .........A-4 Nation/World......B-4 Obituaries ........A-5 Bell, Benjey, Braden, Booth, DeConcini, Edwards. Hart, Heigert, Higgins, McCann, Napier, Nelson, Newton, Olney, Pechota, Pf aff, Prather, Richards, Rowling, Sanders, Simmons, Smith, Stegall, Wuellner Scoreboard.......C-2 Television ........B-3 Holiday shopping turns tragic 1995 stabbing death of Felicia ‘Jeannie’ Rexford still unsolved Editor’s note: This is the last of a three-part series about unsolved murders in the area. By ANDE YAKSTIS Telegraph staff writer ALTON — Felicia “Jeannie” Rexford was in a holiday spirit when she walked out of the Target Store with an armful of Christmas gifts for her daughters on Nov. 30, 1995 “My sister Jeannie was in a happy mood shopping for gifts to surprise her daughters. Jera and Crystal, on Christmas morning,” said her sister, Carman McLaughlin. Rexford’s holiday mood suddenly turned to horror when she walked to her car about 6:20 p m and stared into the face of a man wielding a knife on the store parking lot on Homer Adams Parkway. The assailant attacked Rexford, stabbing her through the heart and abdomen, ending the life of the pretty young mother. More than three years have passed since the shocking murder, but the identity of the Rexford’s killer remains a mystery. The family praised Alton police for working hundreds of hours to try to solve the slaying of the 39-year-old Rexford. “The murder of Felicia Rexford is an open case and we have interviewed hundreds of people and questioned suspects," said Alton Police Det Jerry Cooley, the head investigator who is actively pursuing the case. The stabbing of the beautiful, brown-haired Rexford is one of the most gruesome murders in the annals of crime in Alton. Her tragic death is still a nightmare to her mother, Dorothy Kemp Valdes; two daughters, Jera and Crystal; brother, Edward Kemp; and sisters, Carman McLaughlin, Robin Kemp and Cindy Kemp. “When the killer took the life of my lovely daughter, a piece of my heart was gone forever," Rexford’s mother said, wiping tears from her eyes. Valdes and her family wake up every morning to the painful memory of the night when her daughter was surprised by a killer. “When Jeannie went shopping she always parked in the same spot on the lot at the side of the store,” McLaughlin said. “On that awful night a killer waited near her car.” Rexford was severely stabbed and staggered to the front of the store where she collapsed. “Gray-haired man,” Rexford ■ See UNSOLVED, Page A-7 ii /^ray-haired main.” Felicia Rexford dying words The Telegraph/JOHN badman >rothy Kemp Valdes and family still mourn the ath of her daughter, Felicia J. Rexford, who was jrdered on the parking lot of the Alton Target ore on Nov. 30, 1995. Valdes holds a picture of PRI' RETAIL-WHOLESALE AND COMMERCIAL CARPETING 700 ROLLS IN STOCKI PRICES STARTING AT JUST SO ;

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Publication: Alton Telegraph

Location: Alton, Illinois

Issue Date: March 2, 1999

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