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Alton Evening Telegraph: Monday, February 10, 1947 - Page 1

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   Alton Evening Telegraph (Newspaper) - February 10, 1947, Alton, Illinois                                 River Stages  *^«rt     P0014 ’ ,n0 o-no  Stage ii  F  ' I  Ta iiw«ttr 397.09     Alton Ea    /ENING TE    ;legr aph    Weather Forecast  Fair and Warmer;  40 Tuesday P. M.      Established January 15. 1836. Vol. CXH, No. 23    ALTON, JLL.. MONDAY, FEBRUARY IO. 1947    Member of The Associated Press. 5c Per Copy.     lid Indus'  . Expect Early iKuon a* Cold $ ave Abates  .    -    uLnrk    st two lo-  th* Alton «r~  **  ,h 'T!  •*’ i’/tT.»™  «•*  h y,  rlUSf d a complete  S.’SSS-*"- 1   #***    for    th# Alton   T ’’t£*ted « nd t0 ,h#  ^ I*-"* J*?.;:*, .Vi-, neon Tho  * ,v * S Fur and somewhat  •“Uj'tl* afternoon and tonight;  i#f  ,.mn#ratur* today near ^TSSay morning about ^ udineM    11  ‘  r , 1ier  lowest temperature vrwtern Carinal#  •sr - *■>* bu ’ ,h ,v s  rA-*? “sit  Todaro Pleads Guilty, Fined $500 on Policy Game Charge  No Dissenting Votes on Union School Building  had been     t0   *^Thf ®°0'  h#  ®* id ’ TS?  Ii on various other lobs P*.  lh#  plant, awaiting th# ra-IJgas and resumption of their   lW par ] (, hs.    .  it Lad**. the situation this  'nig wa* >a.d to be th. -me  ^Tesstrwrt of last w eak-with  I* - J.  work  , ii. the gas IS shut L- However, by noontime, ac*   1  I to a Laclede spokesman, a , for the better was hoped for I „ .rasper!* for the resumption Of  I chamal gat brightened.   lant  Montgomery. *upenn-*Mnt at St. Louis for Mississippi ijTlW Corp. .Md U» TAJ. igrapii by telephone from Wa WL \j& rifle# this morning that a *.—h » slight Inrreas# In th# la* Ecru! gas supply will be possible  Supply IneTeased  Montgomery estimated that In* j #u»tne* here would be receiving JI to 35 percent of normal ga# sup-j today. He said his firm I instil »—ther report* which in* din * a letup in the current cold I He said an mere*— in ha*   r—I gas supplies to the Alton  [.IM wi> possible hut Friday and [ ism aa Sunday, ‘the industries , ken- off than they were I Friday”  UA weft w hen the cold wave ti - 1000 were la d off Monday at I I WM*!* and VO st Laclede. At ! [aiwash, prospects of a let-up I .if* told A v.f re* i.'ed rn a call*  I wk at some Western workers who •rn agam laid off as new aear-■to wtather arrived the latter par. of lait week.  Other industrial plants in the I am are equipped to convert to Im af ether taels ami cold wave I 4>0fu ive - rte* r ... ##*ar >.  The industrial gas supply la faked when the mercury falls to [a low point where gas is mostly —did for household consumption.  t Above, Munday  The prevailing cold wave was a lews old Sunday. It began with aa abrupt tilde of the mercury U**f it topped at 55 inst Monde) . Today e\;x , i to be the I —v«*th m whim temperatures re-  Therc were no dissenting votes cast at the election held Saturday night at Union School, District 120, od Wood River and Godfrey townships. on the proposition of erecting a new building and of issuing bonds up to $15 000  John Pettit, a director, said today there Is a potability that an addition will be erected to the present building and that a basement and central heating plant will be added. At present IO children attend the one-room, one-teacher school. He added that the possibility of a greater attendance at the school Is being considered by directors end that when building starts the idea of future expansion will play a great part. Robert Sheiey. 1*21 Worden, hat been engaged us architect.  The directors and the committee of three appointed to serve with them on the project will meet Saturday evening, Fab. 15. at the school, to decide the question of in entire new building or the addition  The director* are Albert Hess, John Pettit and William Herren. The committee Is composed of Wilson Kelly, Joe Kennedy and Fred Berger.  1   Indict Ex-House Officer inShortage  WASHINGTON. Feb IO. m — Kenneth Romney, former —rgeant at arms of the House, seas indicted by a federal grand Jury today on charges of concealing a $143,863 shortage in the accounts of his office.  Romney served as —rgeant at  arms from HSI until Jan. I whee Republicans took control of Congress from the Democrats. He way succeeded by William Rue—ll, a Republican.  The gmnd Jury Investigation grew out of an audit of Romney*! accounts by the General Accounting Office.  The three-count Indictment alleged that Romney falsely misrepresented to auditors the amount of cash na hand in the office and “covered up by trick, scheme end device” the existence of the shortage  EDWARDSVILLE, Fab 10-Domlno Todaro, operator of a tavern on the eastern outskirts al Alton known as “Domino's Tavern ” was fined 1500 and coats In county court today after he pleaded guilty to a y charge of permitting a policy game to operate at his tavern last Jan. IT Costa were  rn * *i  The charge wa* contained tn an information signed fly State's Attorney Burton and flied by Assistant State’s Attorney Everett Dodd  The ‘avern was raided last Jan. 20 by Sheriff Harrell and Deputy Sheriff Hugh Pettit arui equipment used in the operation of a policy game was seized The raid was made after several colored people had been seized near the eastern city limits of Alton and they told police that they were en route to the tavern, where a drawing v scheduled. The raid was made after a search warrant had been Issued by Justice of the Peace Hot meter of Edwardsville, la whose court several .charges were later flied against Todaro.  Today the ca— was moved out of Justice court end taken before County Judge Simpson, who as-sewed the fine.  Council Group To Study Bids On Fire House  Court Upholds Hatch ‘Clean Politics’Law  Five Axis Satellite Nations Sign Peace Pact With A Hies  Would Restore Noithside Station for Un? of New Pumper  Bids caned by the public buildings committee of City Council on repairs and alterations to the oM Norths!de hose house were received this af#rnoon at the office of the city engineer, but because of Inability of a majority of the committee members to be present. It was announced by Engineer Whitten, forma) opening of the proposals was deferred to a committee session set for 6.30 p. rn.  The committee la composed of Aldermen Bowers. Le rn mer*, and Watson. Its meeting tonight is to be held Jftst In advance of the stated meeting of th# city finance committee, of which Alderman Bowers also la chairman It ta expected that a report on bids received win he made at the finance meeting. Inasmuch es the problem of financing the hose house reconditioning comes under purview of the committee.  Repairs to the Nort bride bose bouw at 2411 State are regarded necessary by members of City Council so that there may be a place ready to house another fire pumper when the nti* pumper already ordered, to delivered next •urn mer.  The project has been set up In the hope that means may be found to recommission the Northskte eta-  Coal Shortage Shuts Half Of British Plants; 4 Million Idle  Many Apply for Dole; Attlee to Broadcast Plea For Cooperation  LONDON. Feb. IO, m — Half of all British Industry closed down today because of a shortage of coal from the socialtoed min** Four million worker* became Idle. many going berk on the dole. as electric service was drastically reduced  Prime Minister Attlee prepared to bice Commons during the afternoon and be questioned there by Winston Churchill leader of the Conservative opposition. Attlee scheduled a radio broadcast tonight to plead for cooperation. The Prime Minister and his Cabinet met at his unlighted Downing street residence.  Five Pictures Nominated For •Oscar Derby  WASHINGTON. Feb IO m — The Supreme Court upheld today the Hatch "clean politics” law ban on political activity by federal employes or by state emptoyes whoa# Job* are financed from federal grants.  Two separate rulings were handed down The section forbidding federal employes from taking active part In political campaigns was ruled valid In a decision turning down a challenge from the CIO United Public Workers of America.  That relating to stat# employes ram# on a challenge by the state of Oklahoma Oklahoma attacked validity of the section after the state was penalized $10,800 la federal road aid funds  Justice Reed delivered the courts 5-2 decision In the Oklahoma case. Justices Jackson and Murphy took no pert in the case. Justice# Black and Rutledge dissented without writing opinion*. Justice Frankfurter wrote rn concurring opinion.  Man Injured a* Coupe  Strikes Parked Auto  Responding et 11:45 pm.' Saturday to an ambulance call. police found that Milton Joseph Pueta, HO*  The Labor government, which Hob after the new pumper Is re- converted the coal mines from pri  calved, and thus provide the city with a fourth fully-equipped fire company.  Plans Bonding Alterations  Plena on which bids have been taken cover both a large program    *«.*,»»,»«.  of repairs necessary to rehabilitate ****    .     f     '  the structure, long out of use as broker* *r a fir# station, and aim some alterations to adapt th# building erected In the days of horse-drawn apparatus. so that It can accommodate modern motorised equipment.  Bids initially were taken on the horn house several weeks ago, but  vat# to state ownership Jan celled the coal conservation measure* necessary to avert “complete disaster ’*  The cruds depmaed share* on where some brokers moke of an • industrial Dunkerque.”  Slightly higher temperatures eased momentarily oat of the most saver# cold waves of the winter, but the forecast was for colder.  Moat Industrie* and householder# appeared to be obeying th# govern-  Jugoslavians Reverse St and.  A  Accept Treaty With Italians  Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Romanian Document § Approved  were rejected when cost figures  m#Rt  directive ta throw switches ran higher than expected. Pro- i  vo , unUirl1y  on line* where demands pose Is taken today were Wider re-1.     wn ,*i  M . rykC v« prevented a  vised plan*, in which the ptoposed    ^ »hutdown at the source of  work wet said to have been cut  SIONS PEACE TREATY FOR ITALY —«Marches* Antonio Melt Lupi d» Soragna, the Ital an Ambassador to France, tends his head dost to the document as he Signs the treaty of peace for b s nation 'n Paris, Franc*, tb s morn  r »g The treaty, off'Cially ending the war for Italy, reduced her to a third class power and sir pped her of colonies. Beh.nd him ire Tclisio d> Torte to, ah Italian official; an unidentified foreign office clerk, and protocol cl ef Jacques Dumame — (AP Wirephoto I,     -  British Major Slain  By W oman fit Polo  ROME, Feb IO '.Pi—A British officer, Brig. R. W. M. De Winton, was shot to death by a woman today in Pols, an International Adriatic port and naval base awarded to Yugoslavia in the the Italian peace treaty. British military offlceers said A ma** evacuation of 28,<mo of the 33.000 Italians In Pole was under way.  In Rome, the solemn observance of tho treaty signing centered around the tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the First World War, degenerated by a few disorderly demonstrations. Student and hoodlums ranged through the street*  Carlo 8fora*, the foreign minister. will broadcast to the Italian people tomorrow a protest sent to the foreign ministries of 20 countries which were at war with Italy.  atren* summoned Italians to observe a 10-mtauta period of Silence at the bour the treaty ww signed in Paris.  to bare * engels  At th# present time. the fire partmeat has only three pumng* one for each of the throe mL bouses now in ism. M a pumps* should breakdown, the de pal IMM would be without a pumper for one house until It could he repaired, for It hw no pumper In reserve, The council ordered the new pumper last summer in the knowledge that need for a reserve pumper  complete shutdown  *AU Industries meept a few vital  to health and welfare were ordered to hah totally or hi part In 38 of  the 64 counties of England and Wales. Consumers were forbidden to use electricity between t #. rn and noon and from 2 p m. to 4 p rn. in homes, stores, office* and restaurants, affecting an estimated 22,000,000 people  Confusion and chaotic condition*  Price of Wheat Labor to Appeal  F u lures Hits Adverse Ruling AU-TtmtHighj , n  p ortal  cy  WW acute At the same time ai- ailed In many  *     t m    irs    aet    amb    fndi    “    .  HOLLYWOOD, Fab. IO. im —_________  The entry list tor the annual race I Gold, had incurred a bead Injury  to filmdoms highest i«ak, the “Oscar derby." ww complete today —its IO nominees for leading actor and actrew awards including three former winner*.  The nominees:  Best actor — Fredric March. “The Best Years of Our Lives,” Laurence Olivier,"Henry V ; Harry Parks. "The Jolson Story”; Gregory Peck, “The Yearling” and James Stewart, "Its a Wonderful Life.”  Best actress -» Olivia De Kevil*  esssd under fleeting point.  lads) i low was $ above, three    ~.    __  Ihigher than Saturdays, t land, "To Each His Own”. Cella |*aanum of 5 The mini mum* Johnson. "Brief Encounter"; Jan-  «) today 1.1 as recorded at  I _•* *1. i R Co. laboratory ot Friarri, and 12 aa shown by the jwrtlag thermometer at the  i? *sr»pn building, Sunday** max-I 1 *'* wa* 2i.  ^ itagast recent previous per-w of wstamed severely cold iff** ••• in December, I IHT ***» tor nine days—Dec. 14 I^“temperature remained ■—tag point, dropping to ““tai of I a bose zero on I-At ll  Show i a  florida  -HlCAtJO. Feb. lf), UP) - The Lv™* 1 001)1  *ave m many years * khfamiiis! *now and sleet I ' orid# * ' playgrounds Us*  M th< nor? hern segment of ■tan-. mo*t recent blizzard LTT. kt* tavern Canada  I Ti?  10  **  L. Q*** weather bureau LV* 1 J **joovtu#, FUu reporter ?9  mornm *  l0 * of 27 de-*We Orlando had 32 and  to* It*    frost wrw prob-  L w ta# emir# state, except ' _    *'    '■    • ired to be pro-   { ta Page t,CsLl  niter Jones. “Duel rn the Sun"; Rosalind Russell, "Slater Kenny’ sad Jane Wyman, "The Yearling” Best pJcture-~“The Best Years of Our Lives." "Henry V” ’ If* a Wonderful Life," “The Raeor’* Edge" and "The Yearling”.  When his coupe la which he was riding alone, collided with a parked coach la the 1300*block of East Broadway. Puetx aw taken lo St-Joseph’s Hospital where he remained for treatment. The parked car was listed w property of E. Buba. of 910 Toneor road.  Listed Saturday by the police was a collision at Broadway and Henry between a sedan driven by J a Hart of 510 Summit and a sedan which H T. Searles of 2622 Yager ww hacking from a parking place-_  AP Correspondent  dermen initiated a plan to give the department needed enlargement by-adding personnel next year so that with receipt of the new pumper rn additional how bouw would be manned    <•  Problem of Financing Means of financing the opening  CHICAGO. Feb. IO im — Wheat lying dormant under winter winds and snows throughout th# grain   I    kelt today had a higher monetary  homaa, Mores, offices and J value tor this time of year than  ever before In th# nation's history  While rash wheel hw advanced to I ta peak for the past 27 years. Nearly i gram    potnt#d    out    th*! an  everywhere, electric current  was cut sharply»  The gloom of darkened home* nod shadowy ntreeta wws thickened by a heavy fog In London. Bull ting bam, and many other titles. Thousands upon thousands of  even more spectacular contrast with the past ww being made by “futures” cont recta for delivery of wheat later this year.  Grain tor future delivery Is dealt in on the Chicago Board of Trade aad other exchanges. The winter crop which now is in the ground waiting for th# first signs of spring to start greening up is represented In grain market* by July and September contracts Within the tx»M three weeks, these contracts have advanced  nuai ouiiej* vi    ■— ------ mem* sew*«-» v»   --—    14 rents a bu^h*»l. u hich to  finance commute also is    Birmingham area were notified  ual<Mlt t0 #n  increase of around  with the question of whe her * ^ would not be entitled to guar- sgfujoo In the value of th**  snteed payments if th# shutdown*     Thli    lncrwMt     „    h* s ed  continued next week.     ul * m     the present outlook for a  ims ..nm-* Crumbles from Britain # ration-  nop ot  941.1s1n.Os) bush.-U an^annual $30,000 ridden population and rn pn^kutar  Two  ^yor eau*.*# for the new outlay    [from those suddenly made^ J crop wheat price are offered^ by  PARIS. Fab IO, Un—-Itmly and four other nations today signed peace treaties with the Allies which sheered all Of ‘ here Of treasure and armed power and took territory from ^aii except bulgaria.  *• it**.      ______  power# had swift and violent , • -n* bark tx me,  The Romanian Bulgarian, Hungarian and Furnish treaties were  DETROIT. Feb. JO. UP* — With the biestings of federal District Judge Frank A Picard, the multi- I signed formally during an afternoon billion dollar portal pay dispute session to Uke Clock Roma of th#  of a fourth hose house remain lo workers thrown out of jobs swamp-be found, but ways and mean# were ^ labor ear bange* to register for given preliminary scrutiny at a re-  th4  dole. Many ot her thousands cent finance committee meeting.  wtu  draw their wages Friday unit is estimated that commissioning  (1 ,. r  ^^amnteed 34-hour work week another hose house will require an- ^ jan>  ,ponied in some labor agree nual outlays of about $30,«no. The  m , nU  scores of thousands in the  year to grant an S-hour day to the police department some preliminary this ahem**  l^pmaid Faint* Just  cmfc Vd,|in l?- Die *   10 * Authorly ngJr    ,*    married cou-   r  -    ft -    ' ’’    ”    '  m  that the  ‘“Mil*    toited before the*r  Kw~r' ;n '‘ Doherty, 21. the haSSL i 1 *?  ot  ■ cerebral *>•    t 0 ''-’!-.! on by over-  * Phelan said m    toortlv before Rob-   r > onro >d.    22. and Miss  I -    J' 1 ;'    •    • -J left the  * r  *  ehurch  rectory *    °»h Park.  Us,    a-a, . brides-   r ° uple ltft toe  an , destination after  ifl .,  Mus     was   1 11  a hospital.  Rubbish Fire IpiitP^  Frio Garage Door  With a garden hoe# connected at Craig's service elation, firemen of No. I and 2 companies extinguished a burning door at the rear of Fries garage. State and Belle, .hortly after 4 p. rn. Sunday. The door was "badly ■©orchid ”  Skaters Enjoy Sport  On Goiifrey Pond  111 winds In the Alton area last week blew some bleak good for Ice skaters who enjoyed the winter sport Sunday on Godfrey pond, about a quarter-mile north of Godfrey.  Alton Fireman Emil Werner, who wa* skating on the pond Sunday afternoon #**d there were about SO persons there, mostly adults.  The pond, which to a reservoir for the railroad, was smooth. Werner said. Brisk winds were thought a factor that kept larger crowd* away.  KiUrd in Indochina ^     n     ”    "  Inn.lwr instance occurred Ie** sere the loudest state  Ub JI grain analyst* first, the fact that Another mstan e .. ^  twC  ^eminent won a big majority IS    —-««v«t    must suooort  appeared destined today to return to Congress and the Supreme Court for final settlement.  Labor attorneys planned to carry Judge Picard’s decision dismissing the Mi. Clemens Pottery Co. case to tho Nation’s highest court and maintained it would have little or no bearing on hundreds of ether portal suits on file la other districts.    *  Spokesmen for American industry, from which some 34.800,000.000 Is sought in portal claims, generally commended the ruling. Many felt, however, that reviMoa of the fair labor standards twage-hour) act still was "urgent”.  Aa for Picard himself, he has expressed on numerous occasions a wish that the case would he ap-  (entinued en Page S, Cal. I.  PARIS. Feb. IO. UfV—A »ub* m"whine gun bullet fired by a VietN amene sniper outside I Iwnoi. Indochina, has claimed the life of Michel Moutschen. 22-year-old Bri-  gtan-bom correspondent of the Associated Pre*.  Mountsrhen and several other correspondent* were riding with • French armored column Sutural*) when it ran into ambush. He w as shot down before he could leap to' to a sheltering ditch.  City Council to  Meet Thursday  The meeting of the city finance committee tonight will be preliminary to the council’* first February meeting next Thursday cause next Wednesday  fires occurred within an j®***'**' of about IO minutes, end all three pumpers were f ailed tor se at the same time. The incident was pointed out aa again showing the important need of another hose house When three fire calla oc-  mnnths ago.  A sudden thaw that melted snowdrift* In southern England moved northward yesterday and gave hope that mine production would increase and raUrondi »«d * h ‘P* could resume normal movements  the government must    support  wheat at a high price, second, heavy withdrawal of grain* from this country for deficit area* abroad.  July wheat is now selling around $189 a bushel and Septetnbft-around $1 85 a bushel on the Chi-  mr St the same time. the depart-  nf  ^  Bu ,    informed circle# cago Board of Trade.  no fire company left    “    * -------  n.ent ha* no fire company .«-»*    , $ that the  on duty at any boa# house so that  ptn)anng  for  Be  the Mated  It may be called.  When one fire company I* shift-ed from the scene of one fire to another, delays result.  ‘Babe’ Miller Warden of Wyoming Penitentiary    Miller. • former  Fuel Ministry wa* as much as two weeks of power restrictions.  Recover Bollies Of SI iii Berlin  W C. I Babe > Miller, a tonner    _    11 IT!l**ve the I  Alton resident, has be*n named    / tit ll Ct* I i (ll 11    ureattoent.  warden of th- Wyoming state penl-    EFU!$*^* *  tentiary at Rawlins He was a son    .  of the tat# Assistant hit. Chief     !N     f>t, IO Cf*- Rc». j**r*  and Mrs Lotos Miller. He was  Soldier Home on Leave Ac cidentally Wounded  James Middleton. 1120 Easton street, received emergency treat m#nt Saturday to St. Joseph s Bos petal for a gunshot wound to his j hand inflicted by accidental discharge of a gun He was able to I (leave the hospital after emergency  98 Pct. Turnout at  Elections in Russia  MOSCOW, Feb. IO.  Flrst returns from yesterday’* elections Indicated today that more than 98 percent of the electorate voted for Supreme-Soviet I Parliament > deputing to seven of Russian» union republic* and in 16 autonomous republics. Some predicted that rn full count would show a 96.5 percent vote  Million* of cither Rubens braved th* winters coldest weather to vote between 6 a rn and midnight Newspapers told how ballot boxes were taken even Into delivery homes so that mothers who had just given birth to children might ballot.  (ioiirt OKs Use of Taxes on  mLTin7t'mr(or    ^    I    lo,.,    /    '    .    I    I    *    '     M     J    T|*.|    11-1 ll I ll'11 ion  on LtoC0lt>6 btothiey.     -U4l     for    25    years    and    rose    to    the    rank    ^     of    th#    K aiialust    dance    \    taltllOlK    ill    ll    OC)    I    I    I    cill.    JMlI    lcllltfl*  day ttid aldermanic session must be po>tpored to th# day following The next council meeting will be its Brat with only 12 aldermanic members. Resignation* have reduced active members by two Alderman Winkler resigned a year ago, and Stat# Representative Kenned) re-signed at the iaM meettaf because* of his election to the stat# legislature.    _  of eaptito  __.    ,  Ile is a brother of Chria and Edward Miller of Alton.  Buyer’s Market’ Is Already Here, Auto Dealers Warned  much talked-about    buyer s n ,  aonij|| g > M  why worry,  kef in automobile merchandising    maybe    spring win pro  to already here for a great number ^  a  momentary pick-me-up. but of dealer according to the trade th* hangover will follow quickly, publication Automotive News    The    paper    .-.ag^-sUthat    every  •Th, u«,bi. a- — r,t: v.uZ ™  rift r tndav    bOflltf    of iii I WRi* ^ HIS WM! vin*  &    .h.    |    ° Ul h , ‘ OW ruM n no* r *-  of It do not recognize tt aa yet I to buy right now  EruT $ * Appendicitis*  Only Bubble Gum  MURPHYSBORO, HL. Feb. IO. m — Two wads ot bubble gum. which three and • halfyear-old James Allen Gallo swallowed, caused a major operation at St. Andrews Hospital hale Sunday James, son of Mr. and Mr*. Louis Gallo of Murphysboro; wws taken to th# hospital Saturday in severe pain but six doctors sent him home after X ray and fluraacop# examinations tailed to show th# caus# of the pain He was returnend to the hospital y#M#-day and after # blood caum was taken an operation for appendicitis wa# attempted. Th# gum was found and James has recovered.  WASHINGTON, Feb IO, m —  The Supreme Court, spilt nag 5 to 4. ruled today that public school  th* itotou    .    . ..  halt razed by fire at th# height of a Saturday night costume ball Another 39 persons were to hospital*.  Capt. Frank Wallen, British fire  f     .    ^  chief veld he did not expect the funds, raised    by    taxation, may    be  RutMf#  diaeeaied to strong    terms,  death toll to climb much higher. J u^i to    pay    for    * rapport# atm    of    ^    a#    Justices  af British rosters showed I chfldna.    to    Catholic parochial  grven soldiers missing th# Bi it uh [schools, pgovest mats*hail’* office said. Four  The volumnioui opinions In th* ease filled 73 printed pages.  Justle* Black delivered the court’s majority opinion. Justice  British soldiers were hospitalised with burns.  Meanwhile German authorities were attempting to identify the bodle* Only three of the SI have *, far been identified, they said  Various cause* were advanced for th# holocaust—likened to the disastrous Cocoanut Grove Maze in Boston four years ago abich roused 440 deaths, A British fire control officer blamed overheated stoves while a German civilian.  with the concurrence of Justice*. Frankfurter. Jackson and Burton  M  _ Jackson also wrote a special di*-The division. In a New Jersey    j n  which Frankfurter joined  case, ram# over th* question of ^- hr  decision wa* given on an what It take* to constitute “estab ,    ,     flled by a New  j#,^ ux-  ta  ,nr * pay*, who protested that such use  familiar with the structure, said a  Hah ment of rellgkm" which la for bidden by the Constitution The majority ruled that t to? New Jersey taw to aortal or public benefit legtstatio*. and that im parson may be excluded from the benefit t of uch legislation by reason of his religion. It held that the benefit to the church was incidental * Th* dissenters held that th# payment contravenes the prohibition in the first Amendment to the Con-  (herman  first hi ok# out in the ceiling and I mn tor in-th# Ugh!* leant out Immediately. I J* bleb he is  zen for th* support of beliefs to  opposed.  of money rained by taxation amounted to public support of a religious estabitijtment He contended Du* was a violation of “th# fundamental American principle of separation of church and slate.”  Court ■'ti for the school board to-votved replied that lf states may provide textbooks for public and private schools — a practice unanimously approved by th# Supreme Court to 1930 — they also should be permitted to provide transport#-“on.  French Foreign Minktry.  The United State* was a party  to all but me Finnish Heat). In til, $0 Allied nations participated.  Represent* 11 vee of Italy arui Yugoslavia. which had objected to the Italian peace treaty, beth signed the pact at 11:34 a. rn. (4 34 a. .rn.. Alton Unto).  Th# treaty was the first and moat bitterly disputed of five with German satellite nations.  Unto two <MJ* as®. Yugoslav Officials had insisted rial their country would not sign the treaty. Italians had indicated they would sign reluctantly. Both countries had previously claimed Italian Venetia GiuUa.  Of this. the treaty give* part to Italy, more to Yugoslavia and makes vital Trieste a free city.  Foreign Minister George* Bidault of Franc* presided at the signing of treaties net ween the sat cli Ha# and 20 victor Htate* in th** European phase of World War II.-  The delegations assembled in the foreign ministry's Salon De L’Hcsr-loge (Clock Room). Th# treaty toy on a table in a room behind them, the Salon De Le Patx (Peace Hall).  Ne Explanation  Yugoslav ie. by its alphabetical standing In the list of Al ties, was the nineteenth delegation called to sign the Italian pact. When Bidault pronounced the name, “Yugoslavia." th# entire delegation walked around the table to the Salon De La Paix and affixed signature. There were no speech#* today, and no explanation of Yugoslavia’s change in attitude was given.  The Italian delegation followed immediately. Bidault than declared the ceremony ended, and th# representatives began filing out.  The Polish delegate wws not present hut would sign later.  Bidault entered the plushy rtd-and-goid Salon De L'Horlog# just a# the big clock for which the room was named struck ii a. rn. Representatives of 19 other Allied nations were at their place* around a green table with two vacant chairs, for the Italians.  Bidault, welcoming the Allies, noted that today's treaty signing would end six years of “merciles* struggle ’ anti expressed th* hop# that the ceremony would bind the former enemies into the international family and enable them to contribute to the organization of peace.  At 11:12 th* Italian delegates entered. They took their (dace* silently. Bidault, welcoming them. declared the session formally open. The signing began at 11:17.  What They Lose  The five pacts deprive th# defeated nations of much territory. a large part id their defense forces and $1,330,(JOO,OOO in reparations.  The treaty strips italy of her African colonies, much of Venetia  Continued on Pag* t, CM. S.   

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