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Alton Daily Telegraph: Wednesday, May 14, 1890 - Page 1

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   Alton Daily Telegraph (Newspaper) - May 14, 1890, Alton, Illinois                                 AUTON DAILY TELEGRAPH.  lf’ -  VOLUME 2!).  ALTON. ILL., WLDN EHI >AY EVENING, MAY IL I HOO.  Dr. J. W. Enos’ Sanitarium  ALTOIST, ILL.  TREATMENT OF ALL CURABLE DISEASES.  BOTH MEDICAL and SURGICAL.  a knowledge of na ii nary science and the requirements of such an institution Electricity in all its forms; Oxygen and its compounds; Baths, Douches, Massage, Inhalation, Nursing, etc., are provided as may be required by patients, in addition to such other treatment as may be deemed advisable.  A LARGE SOLARIUM  3Vo"w Orion  POR THE RECEPTION OF PATIENTS.  for further informition address Dr. ENOS at the SANITARIA, corner of George and Third sts., Alton, III.  Latest ie Beaded Wraps aud Capes.  Blad. Collar and Pairs  Latest and Correct Styles in  Millinerv Novelties,  AIRBO  AT  THE GLOBE  ALTON, ILL.  HIK TALK ON TARP.  Mr Butterwort!) Gives the House His Views.  SHORT SYNOPSIS OF HIS ADDRESS.  DR. KNOR announces that he has established in a building purchased for the purpose a SANITARIUM for the  His experience daring many years has convinced him that all diseases can be managed more successfully in an institution of this kind, under the  constant supervision of the physician and with the aid of means not other-  in the patients are seen by their medical advisers  wise at command, than when at intervals of several hoars or dave.  The position of the SANITARIUM is high, and the surrounding are free from all noxious Influences. It is readily reached by the Second street horse cars, and is near the Union Depot.  The building is large, and arrangements are ae perfect as is possible from  id ti    .....  For Sun Baths and exercise in cold and inclement weather, etc., is provided.  Each patient is thoroughly examined by Dr. Enos, and receives his daily personal attention.  Latest ie Cloit! p and Gest s Fandangoes  Shoes Best and Cheapest  Hi* Kt'iunt Ii* Hrrrlv*d with Appinite** on  th*- I lr HXM rot lr Ski* of th» Huns*—  lim Inii lit* s|>, h  ! i Hi* Tihii hr. on tho  hut (J vc* of ll* cij,raefly with ('amula—  .J mu’* of Nevada JU kit mon Ills Drlwtr  on th* silver Itlll.  WasHINOIoN Cit?, May 14 — The boun* nut at ti o'clock Tm-**lay and after the f rtuioncUon of aum*- routine butine-* went into committee* of th*- whole on the tariff bill. McMillin of Termenee* moved to reduce the duty on ammonia. He said be could see no reaeon why thi * article of nm M*itjr to the fanner "htnild be so heavily taxed. McKinley, in op[*osltion stated that kine* the tariff had encouraged com petition in this country, the price of amnionia had been reduced from‘Ai to TX cents per pound Butterwort!) said that the price of an ankle was not reduced on account of competition alone. It was reduced on account of improved methods of in an u fact nm. He never doubted that the protective system was wise and had scat ♦en d blessing* on the land from shore to short- lf there was any danger to the pro teetive system it was in its oscillation be tween the extreme of free trade on the one hand, md on the other, the extreme which created inequalities among American* them** Ives.  Th* I) em or rn tic Policy.  The country- in the election of Harrison and the Ut-p ii bl ii an cm #rtm had declare*! un* quit orally In favor of sustaining and upholding the protective system. The conflict ir IWM had not been between schedule rates, but lietween economic pol-icies. The Democratic policy was well known. It was that the tariff should be leviod for revenue only. The Kepublican policy wa-* that the tariff, whether high or low, should be so adjusted as to establish aud protect American Interests and Indus trios in competition with the rest of the world. Did that policy mean to remove the itpHju (lit ie- which existed lietween in duet nee on this side of the w ater and Industries on the other, or did it mean to •hut out all importation? He insisted that we should not create any inequalities bere. The protective system dwelt with eondltions and not with national bound ary line* except when the pre sence of ♦hear national boundary line* indicated me presence of those conditions agate t * be influence of which it was necessary to in terpoeS the barrier of a protective tariff A Foot ('oittplliiietit,  If the tariff dill not deal with conditions, then a tariff was good in the ab struct, aud if it was, the fathers of the republic hail paid themselves a poor cum pliment when they provided that as between the states there should tie no restriction of commerce. Competition never created n* s industry, They were created by the work of the brain—inventors The committee had tried to do the best it could in framing the hill, but It was not always Mf* to rely altogether on the testimony of the Y-ueflciarie* under the law [Applause on Democratic side.} He had indicated his belief respecting the proper function of a tariff act and would sooner resign btl seat than depart one hair’s breadth from that belief.  Ko iyrselty with Canada.  Of course he resin* ted the wisdom of the committee but why was Paul favored and Peter turned down, Why increase the profits of certain classes He could name capitalists whose profit** had exceeded those of si! of the agriculturist* in any state of the Union [Applause on the Democratk* side.}  He was not, be said, difturbed lei the ap plause on the other side. He was exceed ingly grateful that they liegan to realise in any sen** that our countrymen deserved protection. If when we had protected equally end lifted up all our industries, aud tlie time should then come when we eon Id not hold our own—being the moat intelligent—the freest aud the ablest peo pie on earth—then we had better retire from the field [ Democratic applause J  Butterwort!! then proceeded to expound his views touching reciprocity with Can a«la. He said that wa ware endeavoring to cultivate relations with SO,OU),(JOU people ut the southward and yet ware afraid of Canada. Abraham Lincoln and Ulya*.** Grant were not suspected ai lack of patriot tam yet they favored reciprocity. There were some things in the bill he did not like lie bad known of an industry that bed limo aide to make im*,(XX*.(XVI dividends on a capital et tl,2flO,UOO  Halil th* World in Their Grip.  Protection! Why the country could lo such ae**** better afford to keep them* men in the Fifth Avenue hotel, pay their board and expenses, and set th* rn up in the banking business. Ila favored proper protection, but these mea belli the world in their grip. When he said that be did not favor that kind ai protection be was told “You are not sound on the tariff.* Tbs time is come when some little ooa-rern should be shown to American bourse and American flreobte* A great ("sly of employes iu this rouutry was foreign-in soma great factories in the east they were kn< tarn on the rosters by numbers lietsuse at unfamiliarity with their names. Ile did not believe It was wise ir prudent to make a sweeping redui lion hi sugar to be supplanted by a bounty In conclusion he said that tim gentlemen were fury much mistaken lf they thought thai the great •st desire of his heart was not ta pass a hill reflecting in the highest degree a protective system.  Tile Tin Plate Jinlu.tr,  What he wantei to avoid * ere such feature* as he had , iota ted out in this Mil— there wa* such a thing as {laying too much for an Industry Such was the coos with tin plate Tile duty would be a tax aa every farmer’* patch: on every can of goods. That a tax would amount to IGO,-utXMVJt)brfo;'.* (he mauufacTurere vt ti” plate couI-1 de* la** a dividend Hi aa* anxkMi* that LL* party should not takes false step Ile did not expert to partiei pate much iu I he deliberations of the lumas hereafter Ile wa. quite as ready to »» out os his Democ rath friend* were anxious to get rid of him whea they Merry man dared him oat. lie was already out la* for»: th' y took tbs* action  TRAMPS PUT TO FLIGHT.  A Pretty Kansas Girl’s Gout! Work with a 8k*4|«n.  Kansas Citt, May 14.—A pretty girl and a shotgun put to flight a party of tramps at Olanthe, Kan. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Duffy left their farm house in charge of their daughter Clara, SS years old, and her brother, a boy of 14. The house Is near the Fort Scott and Gulf railroad, along which tramps swarm. Just before supper three rough looking men entered the yard sod demanded supper, threatening dire consequences if they were refused. Fearing trouble, Miss Duffy said: “Wait a minute," and running into the house, mixed a shotgun.  Pitted Pall mf NIM*.  Two of the tramps weir already making away with (lie tioy. While the leader was coming up the steps into th* house a charge of shot met bim and he ran from the yare! yelling: “I’m shot I’m •hot.’’ Without stopping, Miss Duffy Ared the remaining burrel into the other two. The shot took effect, and she was left with her brother master of the situation. The trumps came to Olathe, employed a surgeon to dress their wounds, and hastily disappeared. They were badly sprinkled, only the tinmen* of the shot having prevented serious results.  AVERTED A COLLISION.  Panic (nu««it by Runaway Eertrle Car at Allegheny City.  PlTTSttCHO, Pa., May 14.—A car on the Pleasant Valley Elevated railway roil away, going down a heavy grade on the main thoroughfare of Allegheny City. There were nine passengers aboard, Two women had already fainted, the rest were shrieking far help, and the motor man was pewerless. Coining up the grade was another car, and as the runaway flashed along pedestrians stood still in horror. Suddenly K. ll. Maxwell, a well-known citiaen, rushed forward from his aret, threw the motor man aside, i nd with wonderful strength put on the brakes The next moment he lay on the roadside un conarium), with a broken ankle, a dislocated hip, and possibly fatal internal in juries. Hut he had averted a collision and saved the other passengers.  Vteor General Keegan’s Funeral.  HhooKLYN, N V., May 14—The funeral if Vicar General William Keegan took place from the Church of the Assumption,  of which be was pastor, at IO o’clock Tues day morning. The church was crowded A solemn requiem mass was celebrated with Vteor General May as celebrant; Father Henry GuUagher ss de neon; Father D. Hickey, subdeacon, and Father Tier ney as master of ceremonies Tile Rev. Dr, O’Connell delivered aa eloquent eulogy, giving a sketch of the dead priest’s lite and spoke of his arduous life and the good work he had dune After the mass the remains were viewed by the throng who pasted in single file around the coffin. Interment was made at the Holy Cross cemetery. _ _  Convention of Railway Conti lictors.  Kin in *ti;k, X. Y , May 14- Th* national convention of railway conductors opened bere Tuesday. Three hundred delegates and 1,KX) members sud friends are ex peeled. Public exercises at th* Lyceum theatre were beld Tuesday morning Among th* speaker* were Hucretnry Of stat* Rica, Becater McX augh ton, Mayor Carroll aud others. Secretary Hie* In his addn*** (Minmended the principle of the Order of Conductors in discountenancing strike*, and said he opposeed the system of discharging conductor* on the report of "potter* without trial. He believed every man should have an opportunity to be beard.  Th* Crusts Murderers.  Jon KT, Ills., May 14.—Dourk aud O’Sullivan and their colleague* In th* recent prison underground oat let are still In the solitary The officials still suspect several other Cutten employes and want to grt them through the sweat box process. Deputy Warden Merrill says ha has been working on the case over a month. Ile states that the outside friends of th* Clan na Gael convict* are very anxious about the prisoner* and that they are read ring numerous letters expressing great SoHci tads.  Re Mi rn eg Wark at the Old Nisi*.  ( MICAOO, May 14.- About IOO of the I,Tun employ* * of the Malleable Iron works who went out on strike leu days ago hare return.-.! to work at the leu hour rate sud th« old scale of wage* Presideot Bailey of the works says that he will tate alt of th* old men bach ss soon ss they are will ing to resume work and before lung he es peels that the full force will be at their {•oats oiue more This Is the only labor "trike of iuiportanos lo the city remaining unsettled  Woald Hadar* tis* Working Faro*.  Xkw Yow, May 14—Trainmen from en glneers to brakemen on tbs New York Central railway, are In rn state of mind over the Introduction of two mammoth engine', Nos Mt sod VMI, which nan haul fifteen sleepers each, or twine the regular number and which are designed to run fifty mile" sn hour lf they are successful the read will be equipped with such en glue* The trainmen say this will throw keif th# present form out of work  Fatal Hallway A*(-Ideal.  ( ‘hat I avn«»a. Ten#., May 14—In a wreck on the East Tennessee, Virginia sud Georgia railway Monday the following arere killed Alf Harris (coloredi, brake man. Job* Hailey, of Room. Ga . fireman, scott Price (colored), brakeman; J M Clifford, fireman, of Knoxville and a brakeman, name unknown — Gregory, engineer, was probably fatally injured. The accident a a* canoed by » mis under-steading of orders  The ('rinse* af a Baby Marrier***.  BT. PIET tifit OC, May ll-A probation at midwife arrested at Vilas a few days ago bas confessed that for ten yenta poet eke has disposed of the infanta born in her establishment by killing them and Ih»*<wing their bulks Into disused wells. rte* erat peru-us big ily connected have been Arrested for complicity in her cr!tues.  The Bay In th. groat*.  Washing tov <’trr, May 14 Th# senate j non concurred in the house substitute for the senate dependent pa Laton bdl anda (.(inference WM askoi Davis, Baw jar. and Iii "igett were appointed conferree* OB the part of the senate- The seuetc then resumed uonstaeratmn of the silver' NII and J out* continued his speech  An Important tlaetstan,  J kl KEBsox City. Mo, May 14—Th# •late I ma rd of railroad commissioners have rendered Mi Important ties talon to the effect that hereafter th* practice must be *lsin<toned of colic*-ting extra fare from |.M»* '.gar* w no fail to buy tickets when the extra fur* la in excess of th* statutory rate  Cigar Makars aa bulge.  .Vsa Y< i.k. May 14-Twelve hundred rigor makers are na strike for I livres** in  iy running fr<*m IO cents lo ll per I,'*®. No non md*.n men her* been found bo uke their places and they expeal teepeoq-  A FICHT TH THE tai  Desperate Duel with Knives at Portsmouth, Ohio.  CAUSE OF THE TERRIBLE TRAGEDY.  The VlrtlM, Jam** Moult, Wa* Living with the Mother of the Murderer, Whose Father Was Dead I.earning of the Clreamstaaees the Son Determined to Avenge His Head Parent—Sympathy with the Murderer.  I‘OUTBX* >1 th, Ohio, May 14. There wa# a desperate fight here with knives between James Mault and Spearer Huston, and the struggle ended in the death of the former, be tieing stabbed to the heart. Mrs. Huston, a widow and mother of the murderer, keeps a boarding house and is in st might rood circumstance* Mault talented with the woman and loaned her some money av that she could purchase Mime pieces of tieedtd furniture. As paymeut for this loan Maul! insisted upon taking unlimited liberties in the bolter, and succeed oil in gaining such att Influence over the widow that tiny were soon living openly together, This so enraged the .roman’s son, who whs working In a neigh I airing town, that he came to Foitsmouth, and, learning the true state of affairs, went to hts mother’* bouw and announced his intention of killing tarth Mn*. Huston ami Mault. Th* latter un seeing the son enter the bouse attempted to escape, but young Huston  Cabbed the man by the coat collar and figged him back into the kitchen.  Tike Contest lur Life.  “You coward, your end has come”’ exclaimed the young man ga be drew a re vol vet from bls pocket.  Mault, who had heeome desperate, grabbed ap a large earring knife and rushed at the young mail. The Utter dropjied hts acajou, and, witli the remark that he would not Lake advantage of bb opponent, succeeding In securing another carving knife from the kitchen table. Both men were powerful and a desperate struggle began The two fought for half an hour, everything in the room being lie spattered with their blond. Doth were so weak from the lues of blood that they coaid hardly hold the knife handle at the expiration of thirty minutes Finally Huston succeeded in punting the blade be-twren Maul!*’ i.u*, v,, u ii ne was on the rt(«ir, and. throwing hi* entire weight ujKin the weapon, he drove it up to the hilt into hie body, the steel {tenet rat log th* victim’s heart  ** Father, You Are A waged."  Young Huston, covered with bitsNi, then endeavored to find bls motlier, whom hi' also declared he would kill, but the woman had Aet! frow the bouw as s*>n as th* gory struggle began. The assassin had returned to the house and was preparing to mutilate the body of bls victim when the town marshal and several ritUena ar rived and without difficulty placed the young man nuder arrest Aa soon os be was relieved of the bloody knife he fainted, exclaiming a* he fell to the floor.  “Father, you are avenged!"  line eympotby of every one in the town Is with the young man, and It is doubtful if a jury con be sect sd In ibis part of the •tate to convict him Friends af the pre* oners say that he is insane and they juteod to make that plea the chief argument In his defense lf Ute case cornea to trial  THE ANARCHISTS’ CASE.  Men nutter Write* a Letter to Attorney Automa* at Chicago.  Chicago, May 14—Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, who baa lawn retained as associate counsel in the case, has written a letter to Lawyer Solomon of this city, in which he gives it as hU belief that the action of thr Illinois supreme court In sentencing to death the Anarchist*. Fieldon and Schwab, without their bring brought into court or Mug even asked to show cause why their Uvea should not be taken, is erroneous and unprecedented in any court acting under the Mnime law ra*sle* of procedure Gee. Butler strongly adviso# taking a writ of error to have such procedure coerected by the Judgment of the supreme court of the United Blate*, lawyer Solomon will make an application to Judge Gresham fqr a writ of bal teas corpus, tie Is cued dont that th* effort will ti* succesafui  Ijooumattvr Boller F .pirate*.  Hit AMORIN, Pa., May 14 The boiler of a larutnotfve on the Reading railroad ex plotted Tuesday morning killing Engineer Itogiegeox, and Fireman Charles Kstiff man, and probably fatally injuring Conductor tfooegs C ) eager. The riigine was nearing Shamokin, drawing a heavy (fain when Kauffman noticed water front the boller leaking into the fire-box. He sp  Bl se* I ti»e engineer of the danger but the  Her exploded before means could he  token to prevent It. Yeager was riding in the engine box.  Grave (Ttarges A gal nut a Hospital.  PlTTXBlisi, Pa, May ll. — Stephen Moore, aged XI, died in Hi. Francis’ hare pital Monday. Before his death he re bated to hts attendant* in the hospital a terrible story of bod treatment, poor clothing and wore* food while In the blind ivcs lam M*sire claimed that Fria cipal King instructed the pupil* In the instil dtlon in all sort* of via-", gave them liquor to drink, etc The attending physicians attribute Moon.’* death to bad treatment white In the asylum.  Groat Transection ta Coal Property.  GHAI ton, W Va, May 14 -Th# great coal and railroad firm of Henry ti Davis A Bros has bet ti merged lob* a joint stock com {Min y with ex Sc us tor Davis, Col- T. R Davie. Harry O Buxton, R. M O, Brown and Robert F D*»gci aa ln<'orj">rat ore The Dart* interest* control the A’est Virginia < Yu I rat railroad and hundreds of thousand* of acre* of laud In this state. The company will handle property valued at fig),Ut! >,000  Obi Htsars aillt at Berk.  St. Lot'14 May 14—A terrific storm, approaching a tornado in <jre*trnrtiv*oeao, passed north wot over this state st f o’clock M«uday evening. At Edina. Mo., It was accompanied by hall and did great damage Ie the growing < rep* Ten build big* in the town war* demolished At Janer*c>n City aud Monico, Mo , several building* vers LNwn down.  S.*. We Troahles Regia*  JLanxihaR, May ML—Hmm has reached bere to the effect that the expeditioti under the coniwand of Emin Portia, wh’ch  FOR SALB.  Eight room Frame House, good Cellar, Cistern, Sink in House, Magnificent river view. Lot 50x120. For $1,250.  Splendid Building Lots on Fourth street, as follows,  60x120, $1200; 60x120, $1,000; 63x120, with rock foundation, included, $1,350.  Magnificent River View to each lot  Thirty acre farm 2 1-2 miles southeast of Brighton, all in cultivation. Four room frame-hous rt , Cellar, Barn, Fog) Granarv, Smoke-house* Well, Cistern. Will sell for less than $35 per acre.  Money to Loan.  &  Buckeye Lawn Mowers.  To Houaek-eepere.  Birne Burnei'8*8tor<><l Through tho Hummer Mon! IIH.  Pins & HAMILL  315 Brl lo street,  A. J. HOWELL  DEALER IN  CARPETS, CURTAINS, OU, CLOTHS, RUGS, Ac.  Our Prices  WILL BE FOUND  LOWER-Considering Qualities and Styles-  Than in an? other house in Alton. In con aeq uence of the GREAT EXTENT of our (SALES we are enabled to do Business on a YEIfY (’LOSE MARGIN and it ie a recognised fact that we bandle by far  LtliUEK QUANTITIES OF QUODS  THAN ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THE CITY.  WG SUITS.  I am now receiving a large ami varied stock of Clothe, in all the  prevailing shade*, for Spring Suit*, which I aru prepared to make up in the  Most Fashionable Stvles,  GUARANTEEING  A Perfect Fit  Reasonable Rates and  Complete Satisfaction.  H. C. G. Moritz. 112 Third st.  H. 'VV  ASBESTOS  JOHNS'  J FING  PATKNTEO  foeib«  em', IMusk  Fin JEM’14.00 jr.  Th!* IS u.e {s-rfw-tcd f‘»rm of (‘oculi* ftmflag muss far tx red by ., tm  r t thirty )«««■»•(» isis, led for na* OM sura or Sri roof. in ail * haste*.  • «* lf »n»ii <1 by uii'ki.s-' w< Xao-p. a I ere'* ac-/ * oui tut aam 'rn* un    flit    t    ash    uUtcripitr* prvt* tut /rn Ay Meg.  H. W. JOHNS MFB. CO.. RO 1243 Budolp St, blew.  MWW Yolk,    ft*tsli«<I«l|>lilM.    I    onSou,  gait XsaafteBarereof H. W. JCMItt*’ Uqakt Pdats, As‘asta* fire pl auf lists, Nt»raU»Uu-«, m tiding tau, A*!<e-*IM* Moan Cs* slogs. Stebsf (urerings, SUL WLL AIK WU* MOI LDK O PIITOki.ib PAC Iii VU Kl SUS. CAOlMFML KTC.  lift Dagawoyo nu April W*. sub* red * luas d ira th and daseitlou of une fuurth of  tbs whole number of ifs porters during the first, five days march from the conaA  KUH (SALE BY  W. H. WAYMAN, Carpenter and Builder.  No, 18, First st,, Alton, 111,  I lb’#*#  ajfc i-.Mj.    Jitj  .  Ok. ■ #    ,    tiL   

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