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Hawaiian Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 19, 1895 - Page 1

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Publication: Hawaiian Gazette

Location: Honolulu, Hawaii

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   Hawaiian Gazette (Newspaper) - February 19, 1895, Honolulu, Hawaii                               TOI4. XXX., NO. WHOLE KO. 1630. Hawaiian Gazette, Semi-Weekly -PUBLISHED m HAWAIIAN GAZETTE COMPANY BVEBY TUESDAY AHD JMDAY HOBHfflO Ceo. H. Paris, Easiness Manager. Wallace R. Farriaeton, Editor. JJ Per year................................. Per year, Foreign..................... b w Payable Invariable to Advance. JOT Address all communications Hawaiian Gazette Company P. O. Box 0, Honolulu, H. L PROFESSIONAL. CARTER CARTER, 1856 A. ROSA, No. 15 Honolulu, H.J- C. FARKE, .y at X- And Asent to take Acknowledgments KAAHUMAN 1898 Honolulu. H. I. W R. CASTLE, A. WOXUnBY AT 4nd Notary Public. Attenda all the CourtB of 18S8 the KlnRdom. ____ y _ j. MAGOON. and Counselor At Law. 42 Merchant Street, Honolulu, H. I. CO. King Bethel Honolulu. H. L, n and Commiulon BerolianU, BROS.. V of General mission Merchants, Front Street, San Francleco. attention paid to filling and eh pplng Island orders. y A. SCHAEFEK CO. orters 4. Commission Nlrc's. Honolulu, Hawaiian lalandB. y t. MACKFEUD) CO., General ConunliBioa Agents. I Qneen H. I. y W. BIACTARLANE CO., Importers and Commission Merchants, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, s, Watson A Co., Scotland Street Iron D, works, Glasgow. John Fowler Co., (Leeds) Limited Steam Plow IBM and Locomotive Wotks. Leeds. __ly_ THEO. H DATIES Co.. Importers and CommiMion Merchants, AJTD xaiars Lloyd's and the Liverpool Underwriters, IMUsh and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. And Horttorn y WILLIAM 0. SMITH, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, 66 Fort Street, Honolulu. H. W. SCHMIDT SONS, ME. W. F. ALLEN, HAS AH OFFICE OTBB MES8B8. BISHOP of Merchant and Kaohtmiann he will be pleased to Attend to an; nstncapentmsted to him.____________l356-6m C. UUSTACE. (Formerly with B. P. Bailee Co.) Wholesale and Retail Grocer, 411 King Street, nnder Harmony Hall. Family, Plantation, and Ships' Stores snp- plled at abort notice. New Goods by every steamer. Orders irom the other islands faith- tally executed. ISWT TELEPHONE 119 M. E. Grocery, Feed Store and Bakery. Comer King and Fort Streets, 1350 Honolulu H. I 7 THE WTSTERN AND HAWAIIAN Investment Comoanv. (Limltea loaned for Ions Qe tnon OM APPROVED SECURITY. Apj.ly to W W HALL, Munftgor. Ulncte Fort Bt T Cm or of Fort and Qnocn Btcctfl, Honolnln, r.Painti.OiV Ball i Material t kind MISCELLANEOUS. CABLE CERTAIN, K. [LIMITED.] Iznportero and Declare In Hardtraro, Plo.we, Paints, Olio andQeneral Merchandise, Wtn W Hall...........Presidium and Manager BO White..........Secretary and Treasurer WmF Allen ...........Auditor Thoo May uud T W Directors 1866 Corner Fort and King Ste y B. F J LOWBEY C. M. COORE. D. K W K K O O Ei D: Succeuiore to DIOKSOK, nd Dealarn in And ail kinds of Building Materials, 1S56 FortStreet.HonolnJn y HONOLULU IRON WOKKS CO Stoaia KnelDeB.SngarMlIlB, Cutliig Machinery of Every Description 4V Made to Order, Particular attention paid to Ships' Blackt Bmlthing. JOB WOBKeiocutedon theshortoi- 1856 notice. y T WATKRHOUS.E. IMPOBTEB DEALEB 15 OEKBBA1 mKSCHAHDISK. 1356 Qneen Street, Honnlnjn __ ___y_ J. M. WHITNEY. M. D., D. D- S Booms on Fort Office in Brewer's, Hotel and Fort 1856 j streets Entrance. Hotel street. C. E. WILLIAMS. Importer, Manufacturer, Upholsterer, AND PEALEB IB FURNITURE OF EVERT DESCRIPTION and Musical 1889 105 FORT STREET________ly__ The Senate Votes for a Big Appro- priation to Commence Work. M. B. ORINBAUM CO.. IMPOKTKBS OT Qen'l Mercliandlse and Commission 1858 M. S. ORINBAUM CO., No. 21B Front Street. San Francisco, Cu'. Poet Office Box S603. 1856________________________v_ HAWAIIAN WINE CO. FRANK BROWN, Bfanacer. 88 and 80 Merchant Street, Honolulu, H. I. [ISSVly] BISHOP COMPANY. Xlff XO BXCHANOK ON CF IH Sew York. Cbleaco, Boston, JParta Messrs. M.N. Bothsohlld Sons London The Commercial Banking Co. of Sydney, in London, and Sydney. The Bank of New Zealand In Auckland, Christchnrch, Dunedin and Wellington. The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Cor- poration in Honekong and Shanghai, China; and Yokohama, HloRo, and Nagasaki, Japan. The Bank of British Colnmbia in Victoria, Van- conver, Manaimo, and Westminister, B. C.-, and Portland, Oregon. And the Azores and Madeira Islands. 1356-y DR. R. ANDERSON, SUCCESSOR TO DBS. ANDERSON LUNDY DENTISTS, Hotel St., Dr.J. S. McOrevr' ADM1NJSTERE Dr. LIEBIG CO Special Dootors for Ohronio, Pri- Tgta and Wasting Disease. Invigorator the greatest remedy for Seminal Weakness, Loss of Manhood and Private Disease, overcomes Prematureness and prepares all for marriage life's dnties, pleasnres and responsibilities; trial bottle given or sent free to pay one describing symptoms; call or address 400 Geary bu, private entrance 405 Mason St., San Ftancieco.__________________K7 Canadian THB FAMOUS TOCBIST KODTS OP THI IN CONNECTION WITH THE CAN ADIAN-AUSTRALIAN STEAM- SHIP LINE, TICKETS ARE ISSUED To AIJ. POINTS ra THB UNITED STATES AND CANADA, VIA ViOTOBIA AND VAN- OOUVJLH. BESOBT8, Banft Glacier, Monnt Stephen and Fraser Canon. Tiofeeta to all points in Japan, China, India and aroand the world. For Tiokete and General Information THEO. H. DAVIES CO., Afjontn Cnnadian Pacific Bnilwnv ftn Oanodinn-A nntrBlinn S. H. Lino 1428-lT A H 1 1C I Ir It X-KHI) FOK. tluu In tho n BUI to luoorporate Coder Mutes Inoorporatora Are Pro- inlucnt Ban Francisco Capitalists. WASHINGTON, Feb. a vote of 36 to 25 the Senate tbia afternoon took action in favor of the proposed Ha- waiian cable. Twenty-four of the twenty-five voting in the negative were Democrats, the one Republican was Pettigrew of South Dakota. Of tboae who voted in the affirmative twenty-seven Republicans, six Demo- crats and three Populists. At first it was feared that the Senate would be divided on party lines, most of the speeches in opposition being from Democrats, and those in favor of the measure being from the Republicans. Senator White of California, was one of the Democrats who voted in the affirmative. WASHINGTON, Feb. 9 the de- cisive vote of 36 to 26 the Senate decided today to inaugurate the pro- ject of laying a cable from the Pacific Coast to Hawaii. An amendment to the diplomatic and consular appro- Eriation was made, giving for eginntng work on the cable and authorizing the President to contract for the entire work, estimated to cost This was the first practical result coming from the intermittent Hawaiian debate, lasting more than a year, and renewed with intensity the last week in connection with the proposed cable. WASHINGTON, Feb. diplo- motic appropriation bill will probably go to the House on Monday for con- ference in Senate amendments. As conference reports are privileged, it will doubtless cause immediate con- sideration. There will be a hot fight In the House on this cable amend- ment. It will be strongly opposed by McCreary, chairman of the Commit- tee on Foreign Affairs, by Hooker, member of that committee, by Chair- man Bayers of the Appropriations Committee, and other leading Demo- crats. The flgbt for it will be led by HIM, the ranking Republican member of Foreign Afiairs Committee. Bo.'jfelle of Maine, aud the entire Re- publican side will support it" WASHINGTON, Feb. Csesar Moreno, well known here and in San Francisco, is again trying to secure an extension of the cable charter granted himself, Leland Stanford, Senator Miller, Hopkins, Alvord, Flood, Irwin and others in 1876. Mo- reno asserts that the House will never grant a subsidy or appropriate any money for building the cable, but thinks they may renew his charter. He has been actively working upon McCreary, Hooker and other members of the House. Moreno does not exert much influence, however. WASHINGTON, Dec. 11. bill to incorporate the International Pacific Cable Company, for a cable from Cali- fornia to the Hawaiian Islands and thence to Japan and other points in the Pacific and the mainlands of Asia and Australia, was introduced in the House today by Representative Chas. W. Stone, of Pennsylvania. The incorporators are William Al- vord, Samuel T. Alexander, Hugh Craig, W. H. Dimond, Alfred 8. Hart- well, Edward B. Pono, Jonn C. Irwin, Ray btone, A, C. Hawes, Herman Oelrichs, Charles R. Bishop, G. W. McNear, Louis B. Parrott, W. M. Buckner, C. I. Taylor, O. D. Baldwin, Henry F. Allen, W. J. Adams, John D. Spreckels. The bill proposes to give the com- pany the right to hold the requisite connections in the land offices ami stations, and to exercise such powers as may be granted by any other gov- ernment, with the provision that nothing in the action shall be con- strued to commit the United States Government to any financial liability or guarantee of carrying out its con- tracts. The capital stock is to amount to in shares of each, with the right to increase the stock to 200.000 shares by a vote of two thirds of the stock, and the shareholders are to organize when of stock has been subscribed for and 10 per cent, of j the subscription paid in. Nine direc- I tors are to constitute the board, to I serve three years and hold their meet- j ings in the United Slates. The bill I includes an authorization for 5 per cent, bonds to the amount of 000, to constitute a first lien on the property and provide for an annual report of the company's affairs to the Secretary of the Treasury. The cable project has been the work of Admiral John C. Irwin, who re- j cently retired from active femre, and at whose request Mr. .stone Introduced the bill. Admiral Irwln eive interests In Hawaii and Of the other incoiporatorn Hurt well is a; prominent lawyer of Honolulu, who was In Washington in 1891, ing In the interests of a cable, R. Bishop Is the richest man on Uic Islands, Hugh Craig is a prominent New Zealand capita hat Johu 1) Hpreckels is a son of Clans and the others are prominent Califor- nia business men. It is understood the incorporates will endeavor to obtain subsidies from the governments interested, and will try to secure the patronage of the United States for their company. Keprtfaeuiative Stoue says ho la hear- tily lu fuvor of the Benatu provision for a cable survey, and does not think the plan for incorporation of thla com- pany need Interfere with the Govern- ment's course, or is necessarily antag- onistic to the Senate plan. The bill is the outcome of the pri- vate cable schemes of four years ago. The new company bad no connection with the cable amendment adopted by the Senate Saturday. That action means the construction of a submarine cable by the Government of the United States as a quasi-military work, bnt open to commercial busi- ness at regular rates, exactly as in the case of a postal telegraph system, should one ever be adopted. If the cable scheme which passed the Senate with flying colors should get through the House, which is somewhat doubtful, the new cable company will have nothing to do. If the Government cable scheme fails, the company will be on hand at the next session and the subsidy scheme will be pressed for all it Is worth. Senator Perkins, who was to have introduced a similar bill in the Sen- ate, said tonight: "I shall not intro- duce It until we dispose of the Senate amendment providing for an appro- priation of to begin work on a cable. It the Government will build a cable to Hawaii, of course we are willing to let it do so." Admiral Irwin, the originator of the project, said: "The American terminus will probably be in a small cove Dear Monterey, Cal., and run to Honolulu and thence directly to Japan, with a station on Midway Isl- and, owned by the United States, about a thousand miles west of Ha- waii on the direct road to Japan." Minister Tburston, of Hawaii, was waiting in the corridor for an oppor- tunity to talk with Representative Stone. He seemed to be very much pleased to learn that the bill bad been introduced. Speaking of the incor- porators, he said to the Chronicle cor- respondent that he knew several of the gentlemen interested in the pro- ject, and that they were all men of the highest business standing. .Hugh Craig, on being interviewed in regard to the bill, said: "Its object is to ask simply for permission to in- corporate under the laws of the United States and nothing else. No subsidy will be asked for. ''Having obtained this permission the Incorporators would then ask con- cessions from the Russian, French, Japanese and Hawaiian Governments in order to gather funds sufficient to lay the cable on such routes as are necessary. "Such concessions being obtained they will be in possession, when the next Congress meets, of all the ueoes- eary facts to lay before It to serve as arguments in favor of further assist- ance from the American Government. "The plan contemplated is to build ft connecting cable from Calif or- nia to Honolulu, thenco radiating to Japan and Australia. 'The Japanese Minister here inti- mated bis strong desire to assist the proposition and of communicating with his Government relative to the necessity of granting assistance. "The Russian and French legations have not yet been seen, but from the fact that the French already have a cable from Australia to New Cale- donia on a direct line to Honolulu, and from the further fact that the French in Honolulu recently informed the Hawaiian Government that such a company was anxious to proceed with its cable to Honolulu, shows the sympathy of the French Government, while the warm interest taken in the proposition by the Russian Govern- ment in '90 leads us to believe that subsidies can be obtained from both those governmental'__________ YALE HAWAIIAN CLUB. The Boys Enjoy Themselves at an Annual Banquet. The second annual banquet of the Yale-Hawaiian Club took place on the 17th ult. There were six- teen island boys present on the occasion. E. Knudeen, from Har- vard University Alex, and Frank Atherton, from Princeton and Earn- est Waterhouse, from Princeton M M. Gower, formerly of Hono- lulu, uow in New Haven, and Hon. Francis Wayland, Dean of the Yale Law School, were all guests of the club. Whilfl the boys were dining a tel- egram from Minister Thurston was read announcing the birth of his child and the toast, "Kakina's Baby" was immedialy proposed. The other toasts were Toastmaster, 8. E. Damon. Republic of Hon. Francis Wayland "Ua mau ke ea o ka alna i ka pono." Hawaii of the Past....... M. M. Gower "Should auld acquaintance be forgot." Hawaii at Harvard.......Eric Knudeen "It's a way we have at old Harvard." President Dole- .Hiram Bingham, Jr "His life was jreutlf, and the elements So mixed in him that nature might siann up And say to all the World, 'This was a niHii" The GlrN at Honip_ M. Cooke, Jr "To know them is a llbei il education Princeton Johii Walerhouse "Thf lady rr the Hawaii of the uture A C Alexander "The best ol prophets of future H the past. o A P Pelt rRon h irlt s two political were releaped on .Saturday on con- dition that they leave this countn Both men held cabinet positions under the monarchy i But He Failed to Show Up When He Was Wanted. HE SKE.N AT DIAMOND HEAD. Ail a sleuth Hound Ue Was Not a tlront Hltcboock Placed Much Confidence In the aian and Agglffned Him to Important Work. When the Military Commission opened its Monday morning session there were a large number of native women present, mostly relatives of the twenty-one prisoners whose cases were not concluded on Saturday. At Recorder Jones read the min- PA0L SMITH, CAPTAIN CO. A, N. Q. H, utes and the Court proceeded to bust ness. When called upon the prisoners plead as follows. Kaliona to charge and first specification. William K. to charge and first specification. to plead on advice of counsel. John to charge and first specification. J. K Kamali-Not guilty. J. J guilty. William guilty. to plead on advice of counsel. to plead on ad- vice of counsel. Henry guilty. to plead on advice of counsel. guilty. guilty. guilty. John guilty. Joe guilty. Not guilty. to first part of charge. William guilty. guilty George Markhanv-Declined to plead on advice of counsel. Attorney Ka-ne read the usual ob- jection to the jurisdiction of the Court in behalf of the several prisoners rep- resented by him, which was overruled by Judge Whiting. Cbas. Warren was the first witneas called. He told of the early move- ments of the rebels and those present at Kahala on Sunday and Sunday night, and Monday. Several of the prisoners were identified by Warren; they were at Kahala cleaning guns. Kawlka's testimony was of the same nature as He identified a number of the prisoners as being at Kahala on Sunday evening. Kalauohi at Moanalua; work for 8. M. Damon witness identified several of the prisoners; they all armed with KUDS and had cartridge belts; talked with some of the men; some of them knew I was going to ask permission to go home; one of the prisoners went and asked Warren for permission for me to leave, was sick with asthma and wanted go home: Apelehama came to my house ana wanted me to go with him, told him I was sick and wanted to go; he told me to get ready and sign my name to a paper that had a list of names: if I refused Apelehama bad a pistol in his hand and would shoot me; was told that he had done same thing to a number of others; some of prisoners explained to witness that he was very lucky to be allowed to go; Carl Wlde- mann said witness might go. Sam Kia at Kahala on Sun- day night and took part in uprising. Witness also identified a number of the prisoners there, they all bad guns and ammunition and were firing at the Government troops. Charles Bartow was next called. His testimony was similar to that giv en by the others. He saw some of the prisoners at Kahala and Kaalawai, Sunday, January 6th; they were all arrrmi with guns and bad ammuni- tion. Nahlnalau belonged to squad under Marshall; William Pua was captain of one of the equads. Bill Ihu identified a number of the prisoners out at Diamond Head on Sunday, January 6tb. They all had arms. At 12 o'clock the Court adjourned until 1 It) p m At FkRNOON SB'iMII1- The afternoon Bession opened promptly at 1 30 o'clock, with Ham Keanu on the witness stand. He said that he aaw Knolowl, Kamali, Matli- Kahopu, Waiki and Kahanui at Kualawui, with arms and ammuni- tion. The case of George Markham was the next ou the list and occupied the greater part of the afternoon. Mark- bam defended himself mont of tlit time, with the help of Ka-n. Ins counsel. Marshal Hitchcock was tho ilrnt witness called to testify. Marshal Georgo Markham he has been in the employ of special secret police; was assigned to the residence of W. O. Smith 011 the Monday night before the Kakaako affair, did not see him again after that; had given him orders to report every day, either in person or by letter; had no communication from him after sending him to the residence of W. O. Smith first saw him agaiu on the Monday following the affair at Bertelmann's; locked him up on Mon- day afternoon; was forced to put another man in bis place on the night of the Kakaako affair. Cross-examined by Markham You have been in the employ of the police department as a special secret policeman for most of the time since 1893; do not know whether yon were a witness during the conspiracy case of Walker, St. Clair and Crick you were laid off from time to time be- cause the expenses of the Govern- ment were too heavy; presume you gave me badge of special police which you jiold before me now It is of the same kind I have bad locked up in my safe; we have had several conver- sations together but I cannot state positively where each one took place; to my recollection you have always been paid for your services; when President Dole went to Hawaii I think I told you your services were not needed until he returned; think we have had several talks on the roy- alists do not remember whether it was in November or December I re- member that you told me something about "trouble you were sent to W. O. Smith's residence on New Year's eve; remember saying I would back you up when you told me you wanted to defend yourself against Tom Walker, who had threatened your life; remember of receiving some kind of message from you through the postoffice; do not remem- ber of your telephoning to me from Waikiki that you wanted a pass in order to get into the city do not re- member President Dole entering the room at the-police station when you, W. O. Smith and I were there em- ployed you when there was money enough to pay you; it is probably true that I "went for" you and told you, as well as all my other men, to do something and not to be talking all the time; should have been glad had you given any evidence worth any- thing have not examined you since your arrest; you came in from Wai- kiki and I had you locked up; was not able to send for you and to get your report of what you saw at Wai- kiki placed a great deal of confi- dence id you: sent yon to residence of President Dole because of that fact. On re-direct examination Marshal Hitchcock stated that he had given Markham the order to stand guard at W. O. Smith's residence from 6 p. m. to 6 a. m., until farther notice. C. W. across the street from the residence of W. O. Smith; know Markham; saw him at Smith's house on New Year's eve about 8 o'clock; saw him at intervals through- out the night; had conversation with him about things in general; spoke about possibility of an uprising among the royalists; prisoner had no gun with him; told me the Marshal was a little Hurried that night and nothing much could be said to him, gave him heavy coat to wear in place of the linen one on account of the cold; had something to drink; did not see Markham at Smith's after Mon- day night. Cross-examined by Went to bed at 5 o'clock on the morn- ing of January 1st; you told me you were detailed there for the night; you were there when I went to my house; remember you told me you were a trustworthy friend ot Marshal Hitch- cock. W. O. Smith -I asked Marshal for JOHN I. BOWLKB Found guilty of mUprislori of trpuion and sentenced to five ynars Imprisonment a. hard tnd to pai 0m- of J.WOO watchman, think I came home late In night; remember one lantern In front and one behind, no one there next night; Marshal expressed surprise that Markham was not there, another man was Kent at my request on the night of Kakaako icrapp, was at po- lice station all that night. Cross-examined by Been some rumors of uprising; do not remember the hour came home, thought It Ktrange that you should have lantern out Kaukihi Live at Waikiki, was at home on 6th of January, know Markham HJIW him Hunday on nar row mad mauka of Campbell's rem ience was going out Bertel mann's between 7 and Ram, atnpbell's coachman and heard him all to Markham who said he (Continued on page 5 SPA.PERI   

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