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Hawaiian Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 12, 1895 - Page 1

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Publication: Hawaiian Gazette

Location: Honolulu, Hawaii

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   Hawaiian Gazette (Newspaper) - February 12, 1895, Honolulu, Hawaii                               VOL.. XXX.. KG. 11. HONOLULU. U. I.. TUKSDAY. FEJJKL'AJJY 12, WHOLE 1628- Hawaiian Gazette, Semi-Weekly PCBUSHED m HAWAIIAN GAZETTE COMPANY KVERY lUJBLAY AND FRIDAY MORBINS Wo. H. Paris, Bualaesa Manager. ('allace R. Fairiagtoa, Kdltor. O CJBSCRIFTION Per month..................... Per year................................. w Per year, Foreign..................... w Invariable In Address all communications Gazette Company p. O. Box 0, Honolulu, H. I. PROFESSIONAL. __- CASTER CARTER U56 No. 24 Merchantjtreet A. ROSA, At No. 15 KAAHUMAHJ STBEET. 1355 Honolulu 3. FARKE, And Agent to take Acknowledgments. STBBI, CASTLE, Ld Notary Public. Attends all the Courts of 13B8 the Kingdom. MAGOON, is twenty counselor At i fifteen tons. Merchant street, mill is 34 by 78, H. x. fe large compout f is aud contains n i _ HLAEOEB CO. King and Bethel Streets, Honolulu, H. 1., 'tfrnportew of ISjCB, AND THB UNITED STATES. No. 68 Qneoa Street. Honolulu. B. i. HTM AN BROTHERS. flDommlsslon Merchants. 208 Front Street, San Francisco. ticnlar attention paid to filling and sh pping Island orders. v F. A. 8CHAEFEB MfftportersA Commission Wire's. Honolulu. Hawaiian Islands. y I. HA.CKFELD CO., General Commission Agents, rJ56 Qneen Street.Bonolnlu, H. I. y f iaj O. W. BIACTARLANB CO.. Eon and Commission Merchants, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, -ABBOTS FOB------ Iff IP e t-ees, Watson Co., Scotland Street Iron Works, Glasgow. Fowler Co., (Leeds) Limited Steam Plow 7 Locomotive Woike. Co.. (eiiparters and Commisiion ___ JLKJ> A8KHTB I's and the Liverpool Underwriters, 16C sh and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. trl! AndHottoero AgroraaeeOcmpany. y ar-1 ft c WILLIftlfl 0. SMITH, ie can Fort Street, Honolulu. id OUf.' 13S6-y_______________ uJce ie" SCHMIDT SONS, Honolula. _ froi t Je steaiMfi. W. F. ALLEN, jerheatei aent, whs OFFICE OVEB MESSES. BIBHOP a irough t corner of Merchant and Koahnmmu ig tanks. 4 ha will be pleased to attend pans', f I trusted to him. _ 1356-6ro passed into i _ _ HUSTACE. e juice is Uie Retail Crocor, 8treot" under Harmony HalL Plantation, and Ships' Stores 8np- h nort notice. New Goods by every I UK F Orders irom tb.o other Islands falth- :nted. Per Cet, 119 BRO. "gjj fy. Feed Btore and Bakery. Is KlnR ttnd Fort nilllort' Honolnlr_ H. I v ice t'ie WISTERN AND HAWAIXAH MWJBtment Comoanv. fl (Llmltca cy loaned for long o, faort APPROVED SECURITY. to W W HALL, Manager. Block, Fort St. y MISCELLANEOUS. E. HAJLIL [LIMITED.] Importer! and Dealers In Hardware, Plows, Palnte, Olle and General Merchandise, -OFFICERS Win W Hall President and Manager B O Whito Secretary Treasurer Wm F Allen Auditor Thos May and T W llc-bruu Directors 1358 Corner Fort and Klr.it tHs y II. LEWEH9. f J LMUTHET. C. M. COOKE. D, E Vk K K S C O K E Sacceniors lo LEWSBB DICKSON, Importer i nd Dealerd in Lumber, And all kinds of Building Materials, 1356 Fort Street. Honolulu. __ y_ HONOLULU IRON WORKS CO Steam Bnglnes.SnKarMllls, Coolers, Iron, Brass and Lead Casting Machinery of Every Description ade to Order. "SB Particular attention paid to Snips' Blackt smithing. JOB WOBKaxoontedon theshortes- 1356 notice. y T 1MPOETEB AND DEALEB IK GEJTBBAJ. MKECHAHDISZ. 1356 Queen Utreet. Honolulu__________y_ J. ffl. WHITITEY. M. D., D. D. S Booms on Fort Office lu Brewer's, Blocfc, corner Hotel and Fort 1356 j streets Entrance, Hotel street. C. E. 'WHJUAMS. Importer, Manufacturer, Upholsterer, AND DEALSB IN FURNITURE 8F EVERT DESCRIPTION. Pianos and Musical Instruments. 1369 105 FORT STREET. ly V. 5. GRINBAUM CO.. Oral Merchandise and Commission 1356 'Merchants. Honolulu. H.j.___y M. S. QRINBAUM CO., No 215 Front Street, San Francisco, Ca.. Post Office Box 2603. 1356 _____________L_ HAWAIIAN WINE CO. FRANK BROWN, Manager. 28 and 80 Merchant Street, Honolulu, H.I. BISHOP COMPANY. BANKERS. _ DBAW EXCHANGE ON THEBWIKOF MLIFORfllfl. SflN FMHCISCO AHD A8EST8 Sew Torh. CtoleaffO, Bo.ton, ParM ANr -THE Messrs. M.N. Rothschild 4 Sons London The Commercial Banting Co. of Sydney, in London, and Sydney. The Bank of New Zealand In Auckland, ChriBtchnrch, Dunedin and Wellington. The Honekong and Shanghai Sankine Cor- poration in Hongkong and Shanghai, China; and Yokohama, HiORO, and Nagasaki, Japan. The Bank of British Columbia in Victoria, Van- couver, Nanaimo, and Westminister, B. C and Portland, Oregon. And the Azores and Madeira Islands. 1856-y DR. R. W. ANDERSON, SUCCESSOR TO DBS. ANDEKSON LUNDY DENTISTS, Hotel St., Dr.J. 8. ADMINISTERS Dr. LIEBIG CO Special Doctors for Chronic, Pri- vate and Wasting Disease. Invigorator the greatest remedy for Seminal Weakness, Loss of Manhood and Private Disease, overcomes Prematurenesa and prepares all for marriage life's duties, pleasures and responsibilities; gltrial bottle given or sent free to one describing symptoms: call or address 400 Geary bt.t private entrance 405 si.. San Canadian THI FAMOUS TODWST ROTJTE OP THE WOULD. IN CONNECTION WITH THE CAN ADIAN-AUSTRALIAN STEAM- SHIP LINE, TICKETS ARE ISSUED To ALL POINTS ra THE UNITED STATES iSD CANADA, VIA VlCTOEIA AND OOUVTtB. MOUNTAIN EKSOBT8, Banff, Glacier, Mount Stephen aoid Fraaer Canon. VII.DER CO.. ,6T of Fort and Qn ecu Slcctfl, Honoi i'. i. Haili, kina Esmrass liae of Steuun ftoa Vucowei Tickets to all points in Japan, China, India and aroond tbo world. For Tickets and General Inf'irmation THEO. H. DA VIES CO., I tR Canadian Pnnflo Hnilwfiy an Canadian-Australian 8. S. Line 1426-1 v "Prince" Cupid and Mate Knudaen Before Military Court. NO AKGIMEJITS SI BJIITTED. ExplaiiiH, Thi jugh an Interpre- ter, Actloua lii HelplDg to Land the Arms Captain Davlea that He YTould Keep Ouiet About It. Deputy Attorney-General A. G. M. Robertson occupied the Judge-Advo- cate's chair when the Military Com- mission assembled at 10 o'clock yes- terday morning. Captain Robertson carries the honors of the position well and kept business moving. The case of Jonah Kalaniauaole, commonly known as Prince Cupid, was opened with the usual prelimina- ries. The charge against him was CAPTAIN A. O. M. BOBEBTSON, N. O. H., JUDGE-ADVOCATE. mlsprision of treason. Counsel Neu- mann filed the same objection to the jurisdiction of the Court as has been offered in previous cases. It was over- ruled without discussion. The accused declined to plead on advice of counsel and the plea of not guilty was entered to each charge and specification. Walter Blacker was the first wit- ness called. At this point Mr. Neu- mann made the protest that he had not been given a list of the witnesses to which he had a right. The Court ruled that it was entirely in the hands of the Judge-Advocate whether a list was given the counsel or not. The failure to give this list did not constl tute grounds to delay the proceedings of the Court. Blacker was sworn and testified that he was employed by Cecil Brown in handling his horses near the park at Waikiki; was in the park January 6th and saw the accused late that af- ternoon in the lane near Campbell's house; he was coming from Bertel- mann's house toward the park on horseback; came back toward Bertel- mann's house in about twenty min- utes. I was just inside the fence when I saw him the last time; said "good nothing more. It was between and 4 o'clock when I first saw him. He was riding at a pretty good rate. No cross-examination. Sam Nowlein was brought in and stated again that he had been en- gaged in a conspiracy with Gulick, Rickard and Beward had asked the assistance of others remembered sending the steamer to land arms latter part of December; arms landed beyond Diamond Head the night of the 3d; was out there the night of the 6th. Know the accused but never spoke to him of the affair. told the steamer was dispatched; was told the arms were landed; knew what they were used for, because I handled them. Mr. Neumann asked that Nowlein's testimony be stricken out, as it was hearsay, but was overruled by the Court. Charles Bartow was sworn as a wit- at Kaalawai the 6th of January to fight to overthrow the public and restore the queen; had about 220 arms; some at Kahala and others at Kaalawai. There were a good many men assembled at Kaala- wai cleaning guns and arming them- selves. Here Counsel Neumann objected to what he termed the leading questions of the Judge-Advocate. Captain Rob- ertson stated that he was going over ground that had been rehearsed over and over again, and wished to dispose of it as soon .as possible. Mr. Neu- mann held that this was an entirely separate case and would go on the rec- ord as such. His objection was over- ruled and the prosecution proceeded. Guns were first brought to Kaala- wai Saturday eveniuc au'l .-.unilay morning and afternoon I saw (be accused Sunday noon ut Kaalawai. He came upon horseback, and got off and went Into the house, Antone Rosa's; didn't see hiui again; there were arms and ammunition in the house, the natives about were talking of the overthrow of the Government Cross-examination did not aee the accused go Into the house. There were about ninety men at Kaalawai heard Lot Lane ami others talking of the overthrow of the (Government; first knew of the movement Friday, don't know how long the aroused was m the house; eighty or ninety men about tin- bouse; oaii rifles and were walking around aud on guard at the house. at.Kaalawai Sunday, January 6th. Arrived about 10 When I got there men were bringing guns into Antone Rosa'a house; know the accused; saw him enter Rosa's house. It WAS, late in the afternoon when became; didn't see which way he came from! and didn't see him leave., No cross-ex- amination. Charles Warren was pat on the stand aud testified to being at Kahala January tith There were about thirty men about the place in the morning and eighty or ninety in the evening. I passed guns and cartridges .to the men and some went on guard and others staid in the house. I know tlje accused; saw him at Kahala sitting on the ve- randah of the house late in the after- noon, talking with Carl' Widemann; armed men were inside the house and guards on the outside; accused staid about half an hour; did; not see him go into the house'.rcame .and went on horseback. The told the story of his connection, .'with landing the arms substantially as has been related before. Deputy-Marshal A. JL Brown was at Waikiki the afternoon of January 6th; know the accused; saw him coming toward Diamond Head; I waainfront of Ber- telmann's house; he drove past me going toward Kahala; passed within four or five feet of me. at Wai- kiki under orders from the Marshal to watch Bertelmann's place to see who came in and went out; had located arms at that time: did not speak to the accused; might have nodded; others came from the point; remem- ber John Wise. Attornay-General W. O. Smith wus called to the stand. Know the ac- cused. He did not make any report to the authorities of aims landed or located at Diamond Head. The Gov- ernment was first aware of the facl Sunday evening, January 6th; late in the afternoon; information was to the effect that there weie a large number of arms at Bertelmann's house; also landed at Diamond Head. Immedi- ately this information was brought in Deputy Marshal Blown was sent to watch the place and later Captain Parker was sent with a search war- rant. The prosecution announced that it had finished its case. Just previous to the adjournment for the noon hour Counsel Neumann offered an objec- tion to the action of the court in its disposition of sections in the state- ment of LJliuokalani. The court de- clined to recognize the objection. AFTEKNOGJV SESSION. The Court assembled at There were only a few spectators present. Mr. Neumann said he deemed i unnecesary to introduce any evidence for the defense, for the prosecution had failed to make out its case against the defendant. He contended that the evidence brought out did not show that the accused took any part in the attempt to overthrow the Government The fact of his beipg out at Rosa's place and returning could not be con- strued to mean that he knowingly had cognizance of the movement suffi- ciently to justify a conviction for mis- prision of treason. Judge-Advocate Robertson said the evidence plainly snowed that the de- fendant had knowledge of the move- ment and its purpose; that he saw crowds of armed men out Waikiki and failed to report the same to the authorities. This in itself constitutec misprision of treason, and of such the prisoner was guilty. The Judge-Advocate announced the Government ready in some other cases of misprision of treason, and he would like to go on with these. Andrew Knudsen, mate of the Wai- manalo, was brought into court. He desired to see his Consul before enter- ing a plea. Swedish Consul Weight was sent for, and had a rather lengthy conference with Knudsen, after which the prisoner announced be desired to be represented by counsel. Attorney Neumann volunteered to defend the prisoner without charge, as he was unable to employ anyone to assist him. Corporal Evansen, of Company E, was sworn as interpreter. No objec- tion was offered by the prisoner to the personnel of the court, and the case proceeded. Judge-Advocate Robert- son read the charge against Knudsen, which embraced thirteen specifications of misprision of treason. Mr. Neumann offered the same written objections to the jurisdiction of the court as those entered in former cases. Objection overruled. A plea of not guilty was entered to the charge and specifications. flam Nowlein was the first witness jailed. He told the same story re- garding the plot agaidst the Govern- ment as that given by him on pre- vious occasion-'. Cap'alu William cap- tain steamer Waimanalo; last trip made in that vessel to Kaneohe and out to sea; knew Knudsen for about 'our months, he was mate on steamer Waimanulo; left on that trip 27th or 28th Dei-t-rubrr; Ru-kard made ar- rangements with ii.e to go to sea the day be'ore did not t-Il accused what 1 intth led doing; met schooner on riuuiJay about twenty -five or thirty miles of! Makupun Poi'.t; Townsend, Hutohins-oii ami rowed the Umts to -hort- that b.i'l arms in; Town.send, Hui  knew w hat arms were (or, it was discussed often, defendant did some shoo-inc; with guns while out 111 led with cartridges when taken aboard steamer from schooner; ar- rived in Honolulu Friday morning told defendant keep matter secret; he understood what they were for; did not promise him anything extra for his services or for keeping matter se- cret. Cross-examined no time told defendant what guns be used for; (by Colonel Whiting-Wheel is at after part on hurricane deck.) Defendant been working for me off on for three or four months. Charles Warren was next called. He recited the events in connection with the landing of arms and those interested in the movement. Knud- sen helped row one of the boats that loaded arms; cartridges were in belts; arms lying loose on top of house; Townsend, witness and defendant took part la shooting for practice; defend- ant asked me what guns for; told him they were for fighting against Gov- ernment; don't remember just when he asked question; was before practice shooting; Knudsen said he knew nothing about where steamer going; said he knew nothing about' guns until saw them in steamer; Captain Davies asked defendant if he'd take hand and help ont when got into port; Captain Davies told witness to put rifle in cabin for defendant; accused strapped belt of cartridges around next day defendant used rifle in practice shooting; rifle landed with others. asked Knud- sen if be knew anything about mat- ter; he replied knew nothing of it; told him rifles be used against Gov- ernment; enlightened him as to what arms were for; after arms been taken aboard steamer told defendant what guns be used for; general conversa- tion was held on steamer about mat- ter; it was held in English. George Townsend was next witness called. He told about being em- ployed by Nowlein to go out and get arms; Knudsen was on steamer when boat left harbor; he was in both boats when arms landed 4 he was also in boat when went from steamer to Rab- bit Island; defendant with others done target shooting; he never asked me what arms were for; there was Several discussions about revolution ence of defendant, though he little himself; one gun was for defendant; it was landed of arms; these guns afte: in attempt to overthrow Gove: occ deck accused was standing when conversation held among: selves; talking about whether make it a success; think anyone, if he be a stranger, would be su understand what was meant to 'oe done; words "overthrow the Govern- ment" were used quite often; Captain Davies ordered accused into a boat; did not say anything to him about my being in command or threatened him with pistol; accused wore cartridge belt all time until Warren ordered him to take it off. men aboard were armed; defendant also armed. know who gave or- ders to people to arm themselves. To were in Hawaiian and English; mostly in Ha- waiian; from what I have heard de- fendant say don't think be understood very little of what was said. Attorney-General W. O. Government first informed of landing of arms on Sunday evening; defend- ant did not furnish this information; he gave no information until after ar- rest; talked with him wholly in Eng- lish; it was somewhat broken; be told of the affair in detail; said he knew nothing of the object of the steamer I JOHAH EALANDIAOLE, "pSINOK" CrjPtD, TRIED FOB 1IISPBI8ION OF TREASON. >efore it left; had no trouble in mak- ng himself understood fully all was said; defendant arrested on Monday vening. Prosecution closed. Andrew Knudsen in his own behalf: Davies ordered me into boat o help carry arms; remember Charles Warren and what he stated; there was no conversation between Warren and myself; he didn't tell me guns were to be used in fighting Govern- ment; Georgie said they were mission- ary guns; been in country about five months; Charley said take one rifle and belt and come with them ashore; shotgun next day at wood on water same as balance of them. Cross-examined working on Waimanalo about five weeks; met no schooner and landed guns before this time; thought It was funny way of landing things; heard them talking about missionary guns; could not un- derstand what they were going to do with them; they said going after opium; after guns aboard knew it was not opium they were after; heard arms be landed between Diamond Head an Honolulu; didn't know what they be used for; thought something wrong about landing guns, but didn't know; heard guns be landed near Ka- kaako, guns all loose, Captain viea told me at sea and when came into port uot to say anything about 11; red whiskered man said to witness If he did not stay with him he would shoot him; this was after guua taken aboard steamer; was told stay on board; came ashore on Friday even- ing nothing to prevent me from coming ashore. Davies did not ask me to help resist if steamer wan searched. To Captain some talk wltn Charles Warren; about many things, but not anything about armg. To Judge to see three years; started from Norway: been on long voyages; first on steamer in this country was on Wai- manalo; other time in Norway; am 32 years old; arrived here on German bark Center from Liverpool direct; been sailor all time. To Mr. been a soldier. Mr. Neumann desires to submit the case without argument. Judge-Advocate Robertson thought the defendant could not help knowing what arms were intended for. It would seem from the fact that Captain Davies had told the defendant to keep quiet about landing of arms was suffi- cient to show he most have known such was illegal. He would ask leni- ency for the accused. At the Court adjourned until t. is morning. THE ED OF II Sill Necessary to Gire the United States Command of the Pacific. Appropriations Asked For to Make Pearl Harbor Suitable for a Money for the Cable. WASHINGTON, Jan. with a resolution of the Senate the Act- ing Secretary of the Navy today sent in reports of a preliminary survey of Pearl Harbor, commenced last April by Rear- Admiral Irwin, and completed by Bear- Admiral Walker, who succeeded him. Rear-Admiral Irwin submits that the acquirement of a naval station in the Hawaiian Islands would give this Gov- ernment the command of the Pacific. Hot simply a coaling station, bat a navy- yard is needed, and the positions com- naanding the bar at Pearl Harbor should strongly fortified and a perfect torpedo system completed. The rear-admiral submits a report made by Lieutenant Adams, who says that in his opinion, from the experience in boring and Bound- ing on Pearl Harbor, a dredge could clear a channel through the bar, giving a depth of thirty-one feet at low water without any great difficulty. The latter thinks the previous estimated cost of opening channels have been too great. Bear-Admiral Walker, in his report to the department, dated Jane 21st, last, says an examination showed conclusively that there is a channel through the reef at Pearl Harbor filled with loose coral and a suction dredger can rapidly and cheaply open a way for the largest ships. The channel is practically straight, and the distance between the walls of live coral is at no point less than 300 feet. The rear-admiral promised a farther and detailed report. Accompanying this report is an esti- mate made by Lieutenant W. H. Wood, submitting a total of as neces- sary to make a cut 250 feet wide through the bar with a depth of thirty feet and to widen and deepen the channel inside to thirty feet, and of if the cnt in the bar is 200 feet wide. MONEY FOR DREDGING. W A SHIS i. TON, Jan. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations today authorized a favorable report on Sena- tor Morgan's amendment to the naval appropriation bill, making an appropria- tion of for dredging the Pearl Harbor bar. There was an informal discussion of the project for the Amendment of our treaty with Hawaii HO as to permit the landing of a cable to i -e built by a British company on one of thf Hawaiian Islands, but the matter did uot appear to com- mend itself to any the members of the committee. Senator White, in keeping with the policy of the Administration, expresses the opinion that the proposed Hawaiian cable will uot be built by the United States Government. CABLE FOR HAWAII. WASHINGTON, Jan. offered an amendment to rhe Diplomatic and Consular bill in the Senate today provid- ing for the survey of a cable route connecting the Hawaiian Islands with the United States. WASHINGTON, Jan. Hawaiian question was not debated in the Senate today, bnt Senator Hale gave notice of an amendment which he proposes to offer to the Diplomatic and Consular appropriation bill appropriating 000 toward the construction of a tele- graph cable between the United States and the Hawaiian Islands. This amend- ment, when it is reached, will probably cause another discussion of Hawaiian affairs. O a----------- Edgar Franta Deported. EngarFrantz, a young man who was charged with treason in con- nection with the late insurrection, was pent out of the country yes- terday bv the Mariposa. Franta was a sailor on the Charleston and deserted while that vessel was in tbia port on her last visit. A purie of 1150 was made up on thf Philadelphia for Frantz, and he was given besides a letter to Superintendent Filmore of the Southern Pacific, who will furniah him transportation from San Francisco to Reading, Peun., the home of Fraatz. EWSPAPERl iWSPAPERI   

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