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Hawaiian Gazette Newspaper Archive: February 1, 1895 - Page 1

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Publication: Hawaiian Gazette

Location: Honolulu, Hawaii

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   Hawaiian Gazette (Newspaper) - February 1, 1895, Honolulu, Hawaii                               f f i VOL. XXX.. NO. 8. HONOLULU. H. I.. FJi IDA Y, FEBRUARY 1. WHOLE 1625. Hawaiian Gazette, Semi-Weekly B1------- HAWAIIAN GAZETTE COMPANY B7KET lUMDAY AHD FRIDAY MOMIHQ Ceo. H. Paris, .Business Manager. Wallace fi. Editor. R.A.XKS Per month Per year 500 Per year, Foreign 6 00 Payable Inrorlable In Advance. fff Address all communications Hawaiian Gazette Company P. O. Box O, Honolulu, H. I. MISCELLANEOUS. E. O. MA1LIL PROFESSIONAL. CARTER CARTER. 1858 No 34 Merchant Street. A, ROSA, Ho. 15 KiAHimxso STBBST. Importoro and in Hardware, PlowB.Painta, Oils and General Merclmndiao, OFFIUEBS Wm W Hall _.PreBldeni and Manager B O White Secretary and Treasurer Wm F Allen Auditor Thos May and T W Hobrot, Directors 1858 Corner Fort and King Sts y B. LEirnna T i LOWTBKT a a. OOOKB. IL. K W E M 8 C" O O K IE Successors lo LBWBBB DIOKBON, D ad Doalero in AndailklndB of Building Materials, I3S6 Forl Street.Honolulu, y HONOLULU IRONWORKS CO Steam Engines, Sugar Mills, Boilers., Coolers, and Load Casting Machinery of Every Description ea- Made to Order, -es Particular attention _patd to Ships' Blackt smithing Was Once ID Favor Hawaiian Cable. of an MR. KARNK-T M fPOKT. Committee Regarded the Project a Ueaaure of High National A Danger Xhat Trade May be Diverted to Canada if the KnglUh Succeed, 1856 JOB WOBKexMatedou theahorteft. notice y T WATEBHOUJDJE, IMFOBTEB AND DKALEB IN 6KK2EAL MKBCHAHDISE. 1356 Queen Street, Honolulu ______y J. M. WHITNEY. M. D., D. D. 8 on Fort Office In Brewer's, Block, corner Hotel and Fort 1358 y streets Entrance, Hotel street. 1856 And Agent to take Acknowledgments. 13 KAAHTTOAND STBBE, 1893 _ Honoluln, HI 1 W- R. CASTI.E, Mid Notary Public. Attends all the Conrta of 1256 the Kingdom. __ V J. MAGOON. Attorney and Counselor At 42 Merchant Street, Honolulu, H. I. 1843 _ ____ _ Law- ED MOFFSC11LAEGEB dc CO. 1356 King and Bethel Streets, Honolulu, H. L, Commiwioa MereJuuiti. and BROS.. Importer! of General Ueronandiie, TOOK----- AHO THB TJNITED STATES. Ho. 68 ST1CAN BROTHEBS. Commission Merchants, 80S tfront Street, San Francisco. Farttcnlar attention paid to filling and pplns 1878 Island orders. 7 F. A. SCHAEFEB A CO. Importers A Commission Wire's. 1886 Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. y H. CO., General Commission Agents. 1856 Queen H. I C. E. WILLIAMS, Importer, Manufacturer, TTphoUterer, AHD DEiLEB IB----- FURNITURE 8F EVERT DESCRIPTION. Planoa and 1869 105 FQBT STBKBT_________ly_ M. S. GKXNBAtTM CO.. OP------ Gen'l Merchandise and Commission 135fi Honolulu. H. I. y M. S. GRINBAUM CO., No. 215 Front Street, San Francisco, Cal. Post Office Boi 2603. 1856 HAWAIIAN WINE CO. FRANK BROWN, Manager. 28 and 30 Merchant Street, Honoluln, H. I. BISHOP COMPANY. 1808. BANKERS. DRAW BTCHATTQK ON THEBMWOFCUFOftNM. SAB FRURCISCO TBUB A6ZHTS Chicago, Boston, G. W. MACFARCANE AGO., Importers and Commission Merchants, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, -----A8BNT8 Blrrloofl, Watson A C John Fowler Co., 1858 and Locomotive 8treet Iron Limited Steam Plow 'oifes, Leeds ly Importers H Co.. and CommiMion Oarchants, AND AWEHTS Lloyd's and the LlverpoolTJnderwrtters, and Foreign Marine Insurance Assarmec Company, Co. y WILllAM 0. SMITH, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, Fort Street, Honolulu 13I6-y W. SCHMIDT SONS, ad Honolulu. lift, W. F. ALLEN, TTAS AS OFFICE OVEB MBSSB8. BISHOP b H of Merchant and etmeti.and he will be pleased to attend to any lutnoqp entrusted to htm.__________1358-am C. HUSTACE. (Formerly with B. F. Bolles Co.) Wholesale and Retail Grocer, 111 King Street, under Harmony Hall. Family Plantation, and Ships' Stores sup- plied at short notice New Goods by every (Steamer Orders the other islands falth- TELEPHONE 11O M. E. A BItO. Grocery, Food Store and Bakery. Corner King and Fort Streets. 1856 Honolulu J! I _ V THE WESTERN APTD HAWAIIAN Investment Comoanv (Limitea loaned for o. finort ON APPROVED SECURITY to W W HALL, Manager ________ Bearnr Block Fort St y WILDER CO.. Crnorof Fort and Qncen Stocta Honoltnn HMU, SaJt ft Building 392 SF4PFR1 kind Hew York, THE 4 Messrs. M.N. Rothschild Sons London The Commercial Banking Co. of Sydney, In London, and Sydney. Bank of New Zealand In Auckland, ChrlBtchnrch, Dunedln and Wellington The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Cor- poration In Hongkong ani Shanghai, China; and Yokohama, Hlogo, and Nagasaki, Japan. The Bank of British Columbia in Victoria, Van- couver, Nanalmo, and Westminister, B C., and Portland, Oregon. And the Azores and Madeira Islands. __________________1356-y__________________ DE. R. W. ANDERSON, SUCCESSOE TO DBS. ANDERSON LUNDY DENTISTS, Hotel St., Dr. J. 8. MeQrevr' flW-GA8 Dr. "LIEBIG CO Special Doctors for Chronic, Pri- vate and Wasting Disease, nvigorator the greatest remedy for Seminar Weakness, Loss of Manhood and Private Disease, overcomes Prematureness and prepares all for marriage life's duties, pleasures and responsibilities; bottle given or sent free to ray one describing symptoms: call or address 400 Geary bt., private entrance 405 Uasm at., San Ftanclsco.______ _____________157 Canadian Pacifii Tax FAMOUS TOUBUT ROTITB or THI Df CONNECTION WITH THE CAN ADIAN-AUSTRALIAN STEAM- SHIP LINE, TICKETS App. ISSI7ED To AIJ. Ponrra ra UNITED STATES HID CANADA, VIA VICTORIA AND VAN- CODTia. MOCTNTAIU RISOBTS, Bang; Glacier, Mount Stephen and Fraser Canon. Line of Steamers frsa Vanconret Tickets to ill points in Japan, China, India find aroand the world. SSJ1" For Tickets and General Inf onnaHon THEO. H. DA VIES CO., Canadian Pnoiflo Ballway an Canadian-Australian S. S Line U26-ly The willingness of tbe Hawaiian authorities to grant cable concessions to Great Britain is due to their great desire to establish quick communica- tion with this continent, coupled with their belief that the United States Government will give no financial aid to an independent cable line between the "United States and Hawaii, says a late Washington Star. A bill for aiding an enterprise which pro- posed laying a wire between California and Honolulu came up in the last Congress, hut was amended in the House by providing simply for a sur- vey. The main objection to the ap- propriation in aid of the cable was that, as the islands were not a part of our territory, there was no national obligation to assist an enterprise to establish connection with them. There was not a sufficient promise of business for such a line to justify it as p. purely commercial enterprise. The practicability of a cable line be- tween the United States and Hawaii is fully established by four surveys made by the Tuscarora, Albatross and Thetis. The surveys of the Tuscarora were made many years ago, but those of the Albatross and Thetis were made between October, 1891, and May, 1892. The general conclusion reached by Lieutenant Commander Clover of the hydrographic office, as a result of these surveys, is that a practicable lane exists on tbe route to Hawaii, having an average breadthv of 800 miles, along which, at various points, are sharp peaks, arising abruptly toward the surface of the ocean. Ac- cording to this authority, the most suitable route is along amercator line between Monterey bay and Honolulu, a distance of about 2100 miles. This requires a minimum length of cable, I while tbe bottom is chiefly ooze, which is known to be the best for pre- serving the sheathing unimpaired. The surveys showed the existence of a great plateau between tbe two coun- tries. The deepest sounding was 3168 fathoms, formed by a large valley that fell 4000 feet below the surround- ing level. The greatest elevation above surrounding levels was 9500 feet. Coral formations near Honolulu would probably require the cable to be incased in steel armor at that point. There is a trans-Pacific cable already laid and working between Queensland tfnd New Caledonia, a distance of about 800 miles, and the French com- pany that built it is planning to con- tinue it by way of the Fijis and Samoa to Hawaii, and thence to this con- tinent. "Whether the line, if the ex- tensions are made, will run from Honolulu to British Columbia or to some point in California, it is said, depends on the offers that may be made to those interested in the enter- prise. Tbe establishment of a British cable station on one of the Hawaiian islands would possibly cause tbe aban- donment of the French project. In February, 1891, Mr. Cbipman, from the Committee on Foreign Af- fairs, submitted a report recommend- ing tbe passage of the bill to incorpor- ate the raclflc Cable Company for the purpose of laying a submarine tele- la the course of events, telegraphic communication throughout the Pacific ocean and with tbe shores of America, Asia and Australasia id indispensable and certain to come. Tbe section join- ing Hawaii to the American conti- nent, besides being the shortest and least costly link in the general chain, is by far tbe most important from political points of view; and I deem it of tbe highest consequence to the United States that it be promptly con- structed by American enbrt, and with tbe sanction of our government." In view of subsequent events in tbe political history of the United States the following extracts from the mes- sage of President Cleveland to Con- gress, dated December 3, 1888, indors- ing tbe American cable project, have a strange and annatnral sound: "Proclamation was duly made on the 9th day of November, 1887, of the conventional extensions of the treaty of Jane 3. 1873, with Hawaii, under which, relations of such special and beneficent intercourse have been cre- ated. "In the vast field of oriental com- merce now unfolded from our Pacific borders feature presents stronger recommendations for congressional ac- tion than the establishment of com- munication by submarine telegraph with Honolulu. "The geographical .position of the Hawaiian group, in relation to our Pacific States, creates a natural inter- dependency and mutuality of interest which our present treaties were in- tended to foster, and which make close communication a logical and commer- cial necessity." That President Cleveland may now be justly expected to exercise his HE TELLS. HIFFERENFTJILE V. V. Ashford Denies All Know ledge of the Late Uprising. ONLY GATE NOWXBIN ADVICE. C. W. Athford Olvoi Erldence IB the of V. V. Aahford and NowlelA dn Walklbl atovemeata of Defradtat. a_____ces in giving Great Britain a manifold advantage over the United States, in the matter of quick com- munication with the Hawaiian Re- public, is evidenced by the message he aent to Congress on the 9th instant. In that 'message he indorsed the pro- position for a British cable station on the islands in the following words: "I hope Congress will see fit to grant the request of the Hawaiian Government, and that our consent to the proposed lease will be promptly accorded. It seems to me we onght not, by a refusal of this request, to stand in the way of the advantages to be gained by isolated Hawaii through telegraphic communication with the rest of the world, especially in view of the fact that oar own communication with that country would thereby be greatly improved without apparent detriment to any legitimate American interest." __________ ME BUT LITTLE Fl. A Blaze Discovered in Henry Ber- telmann's Carpenter Shop. Believed To Be the Act of Am Incen- Before the Fire Wai Located. Of ,ph from San Francisco to the Hawaiian Islands, and thence via Samoa to New Zealand, and also to Japan, and providing an annual sub- sidy of for fifteen years. In concluding their report the com- mittee said: "Your committee regard the establishment of asnbmarine elec- tric telegraph between San Francisco and Hawaii as a measure of high na- tional concern, which will be an effi- cient factor not only in securing Ha- waiian autonomy as long as the inter- ests of the United States require, and a firm and permanent American in- fluence in the Hawaiian Islands, but in securing for oar country the com- merce of the Pacific ocean and the trade of the Australasian continent. We also think that unless suoh action as is proposed in the bill be taken at this session, the danger is great that a large proportion of that trade and commerce will be diverted to Canada and England. For the reasons here named, if there were no other consid- erations which occur to those observ- ant of public affairs, It appears to your committee that this bill ought to be enacted." In a letter to the committee, dated January 22, 1891, Secretary Blame summarized his support of tbe propo- sition in the following vigorous words "I have no doubt of the great Im- portance to the United States of pos- sessing cable communication with Hawaii. Besides subserving the close interests which we maintain with those islands, and tending to exert a positive and potential influence on the political autonomy of the Hawal ian group, such a cable would be a necessary factor In a great scheme of direct communication with China and Japan, and with Australasia by way of the Samoan Islands That unsightly row of wooden shanties on King street, opposite Cunha's new building, escaped de- struction by fire last night owing to the prompt discovery of the blaze and the subsequent work of the fire department. About 10 o'clock a dense volume of smoke was seen issuing from one of the buildings situated next to a Chinese shop. An alarm was turned in. When the department arrived smoke was forcing its way out of the front of the stores on either side. The fire could not be located for a few moments, but when it was a strong stream of water extinguished it in short order. The blaze started in Henry Ber- telmann's carpenter shop. The front of the building is occupied by tbe Pacific Transfer Company and Molteno's barber shop. The fire started in a loft and was kept confined by a corrugated iron reof. An opening was cut in the roof, through which the hosepipe was inserted. The blaze had not made much headway on account of the absence of any draught. The dam- age will not amount to much. Tbe property is owned by James W. Austin, of Boston, Mass. Bishop Co. are the agents. Bertelmann's shop has been closed since he has been under ar- rest. This fact caused Deputy Marshal Brown to start an investi- gation last night. He is of the opinion that the place was set on fire. What object the incendiary had in view cannot be conjectured. Some of the bystanders were afraid that some bombs might have been trdden in the shop, and were a trifle nervous in consequence. The exposure to all sorts and con- ditions of weather that a lumberman is called upon to endnre in the camps often prodnces-savere colds which, if not promptly checked, result in con- I freshen or pneumonia Mr J O. Davenport, ex manager of tbe Fort Bragg Redwood Co an immense in- stitntion at Fort Bragg, Gal, says they sell large quantities of Chamberlain's Cough Kemfdy at the company's store and that he has himself nsed this remedy for a severe cold and obtained immediate relief This medicine prevents any tendency of a cold toward pneumonia and in- sures a prompt recovery For sale by all dealers. BENSON, SMITH Co Agents for H. I Legal sparring, connected with the- admission of evidence relating to the official commiasiona drawn op by Uliuokalani for her new govenuuanti was the principal feature of yesterday morning's session of tbe Military mission. Tbe Judge-Advocate closed tbe testimony against V. V. Ashford at noon, when witnesses were pat on4 tbe stand by Attorney Neumann in defense of his client. Tbe morning session opened shortly after o'clock. Charles Warren was tbe first witness called, and told bis connection with the landing of tbe arms, bat gave no direct testimony against Mr. Asbford. George Towns- end was sworn, and stated that be assisted in landing arms from the Waimanalo, and was on board the steamer. After the arms had been landed on Rabbit Island he came back to Washington Place and reported the fact to Sam Nowleln. Attorney-General W. O. Smith tes> tified that the first knowledge that the Government had that arms bad been landed was on tbe night of Jan. 6tb; knew nothing of it before. W. F. Kaae, who has. acted as the ex queen's private secretary since January, 1893, furnished the testi- mony that called for a difference of opinion between Mr. Neumann and Captain Kinney. Kaae stated that he did some work connected with draw- ing op the commissions for the offices of the Liliuokalani government about December There were eleven commissions. Witness was instructed how to fill them oat by C. T. Gulick. Tbe ex-queen signed the commissions, after which Kaae put them In an en- velope and handed them to her; did not enow where they went to; thought Mrs. Dominia destroyed them. When 'the witness was asked to the contents of tbe documents, Counsel Neumann objected on the ground that the documents were evidence in them- selves. Captain Kinney stated that the documents could not be obtained, and be must place his evidence in another form. The Court retired for consultation, and ruled that evidence on the con- tents of the documents would be al- lowed, it being shown that they were of treasonable intent, and the Judge- Advocate could not obtain them to put them in evidence. The witness then told the personnel of the proposed government, with V. V. Ashford, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, C W. Ashford Attor- ney-General, as has been previously published. He stated that C. W. Asbford had called on the ex-queen twice during the month of De- cember, once during the trial, of Bush and Nawahi; could not re- member whether the visits were be- fore or after Mrs. Dominis signed the commissions. On cross-examination Kaae said he had been clerk for the late queen; did all the writing for her; was guard at the same time, she did some law busi- ness connected with the Dr.McKibbin property at her home; commissions were signed about December 28th at Washington Place; after she signed them the witness put them in an en- velope and banded to her. Don't know that anyone witnessed tbe sig- nature; no one present but witness and ex queen; had worked for her since January, 1893. Witness made his first statement at the station house after his arrest He was asked ques- tions and told all he knew; asked if he drew up the commissions and said yes. When asked if he had been threatened before or while the state- ment was made, Kaae hesitated and finally said, "They said to me I was liable to be hung if I did not tell the truth, I told tbe truth." Mr. Kinney had talked with him. On being ques- tioned by Captain Kinney, Kaae ad- mitted that be was told that the Gov- ernment knew all about the affair and that he had done something which was punishable by hanging; he had not been directly threatened with hanging. After a recess of half an hour for the purpose of allowing V. V. Ashford to procure some papers from his office, the Court reassembled at Mr. Neumann announced be was ready to proceed and would call C. W. Ashford as the first witness. The Court took a recess until p. m. tbe landing of the arms and in many ways was cognizant of the rebellion. Mr. Neumann said that the testi- mony did not connect the defend- ant. The Judge-Advocate replied that it did: he said, "to put him on his AFTERNOON SESSION. Paul Neumann asked that the evi- dence of William Kaae be stricken out aa it was not pertinent testimony. He objected most to the statement that V. V. Ashford had been appointed an Associate Justice and that his commiasion bad been made out Captain Kinney suggested that Ashford be placed on the stand to deny that be was not aware that he had been appointed to the supreme bench The defendant had full knowl edge of the conspiracy, he knew about The Court retired to consider the objection and decided to sustain Mr. Neumann's objection. C. W. Ashford was called for the defense. He stated that ha knew Nowleln; had business intercourse with him covering a few weeka prior to the present year; be last apoke to Mm on Saturday, December 29; had not spoken to him since; he bowed to him on the 5th of January; he had not written to NowJein; they discussed at different times two one, to connection with an anticipated search of Washington place for arms, and a romor about the wholesale arrest of royalists; at thlavUife they talked over business matters; he could not >y how many times he bad talked to owlein; it was about six; Nowlein allied at his office without being aaked, oneboa- Ineaa visit; Nowlein had said nothing to witness about Overthrowing the Stovernment; he discussed with'Now- about tbe evidence brought out in the Bush, Crick and Nawahi conspir- acy case: they did not talk about any of Nowleln's plans; witness heard rumors; did not receive any knowl- edge of the receipt of arms; he did not know anything about the bringing of arms until he returned from Hilo; this was on the 4th inst.; be did not com- municate anything to his brother about tbe uprising; be saw his on tbe day he returned; was not sure that was Friday, the 28th; was one of the days when he talked to Nowlein; there was a time about that date when he called; witness remarked, "I see you are not in be read Nowlein a strong lecture, and de- clined to have anything to do with any plans; Nowlein said nothing about his plans at the time; Nowlein asked him not to go to Hilo; witness refused, stating that he could not neglect business; Nowlein replied that if lie went away they would get in trouble; he was afraid that they might be arrested; witness suggested 'that his brother be consulted incase a law- yer's advice was needed; witness in- formed his brother of the con versa tit n had with Nowlein; told him that i e cafe would be in relation to the who sale arrest of royalists; there was 10 arrangement made for witness his brother to meet Nowlein; when ne last saw Nowlein witness had not made up his mind to go to Hiio; wit- ness denied tbe Waikiki road meet-' ing; his advice to Nowlein was, if the officers came with warrants thoy" would search; there would only lie one way to prevent it, and that was fight; be said as soon as yon begin to fight yon will get in trouble; told Nowleln to request officers not to search until witness could be called, so he could examine the warrant to see if it was regular and legal; did not know that- the Waimanalo was employed to land arms; had beard- rumors about natives and Chi- nese arming themselves; wit- ness made no arrangement whereby his brother and Nowlein would meet on the Waikiki road Nowlein's statement is untrue; at no time did he communicate to Nowlein that he had received word from his brother that an uprising was to take place. not remem- ber the date of Nowlein's first visit; it was in December; the first half, con- versation was in his office; no one was present at this interview, they talked about a land question, the arrest of Crick, Bush and Nawahi, and the pro- bable arrest of the royalists; be sent a message to Nowlein to meet him at Waikiki; wanted to see him in regard to the Bush-Crick conspiracy case, wanted to get some information bear- ing on the case be sent a hackman for Nowlein. In answer to the question, "Who was tbe hackman the witness de- clined to answer. Judge-Advocate Kinney appealed to the Court. The Court decided that he would have to answer. The witness consented, and said it was a native named Keala, who drove hack No. 138, at the I X L stand; he told Keala to find Nowlein and tell him to meet witnesi at Long Branch, they remained at the beach for about half an hour; he ulked to Nowlein and with C. B. Wilson, who were there; when witness arrived, Nowleln and Wilson were talking together; after he transacted his business, he drove through tbe Park to Waikiki and then went home; he saw Nowlein tbe same night at bis house; he said I have heara down town that a crowd of police bad been sent to Bush's place to search for arms; Nowlein said he was afraid they would go to Wash- ington Place on the same errand He asked what he would do; witness replied that be would have to submit or fight; it would be foolish to do the latter, witness would not state what the nature of his conversation with Nowlein was at the meeting at the Long Branch, the meet- ing was a perfectly legitimate one, and there was no significance in the meeting, it was not true that he bad received a message on that day from the queen; Nowlein renewed hla request for advice at Long Branch; the advice did not seem to please Nowlein, who appeared worried and ill at ease, Wilson interrupted the conversation several times, when they parted Nowlein had a proper idea of what witness thought of the search warrant question, he saw Nowlein on five occasions, Nowleln called twice at his office; the second visit was devoted to discussing theevidence in the Buah- Nawahl conspiracy case, he toot oc- casion to criticize the native move- ment and ffave bis opinion as to It he- Ing an absurd one; at this lime he expressly stated to Nowleln that be did not want to know his plans, wlt- (Oonttnued on page 5 'SPAPFRJ   

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