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Thomasville Times Newspaper Archive: February 5, 1887 - Page 1

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   Thomasville Times (Newspaper) - February 5, 1887, Thomasville, Georgia                                 p.,  -1 .  , ?  afffflOB^—Over M- Isaac's «toÄ, Ç©r-nerBroadand Jaelcsoxi Street«  ¿Gi-MSllEl) liV^EUY SATURDAV B^  laiPLETT & OHAST^.  SITBSOBII'TIOBr BATÄS.  ' uKil X JSAK,.  -SIX MONTJJSj............ •  THBEEMONTHS,.-....--  |EATABI»B IH AliVANOÄ.  ^ AÌ>VEBT1SIN« «4TE8.  ^ AÌ>VEBT1SIN« «4TE8.         2    m  0    S    Í    Ol' 2    l        rraes  J          et 3  er  oc ^    i« g.  CO a*    1  S    «  1 «    1    m  1 •e    5    ' "i ■3  ««      X wéeb.    ÏÏ"    Tí    »8    Tí    18            .»8      Weeks.    2    8    6    «r    10    13    1»    ts      a Weeiu.    3    4    6    i  Í    12    -48    Ì9    29      1 l^ntli.    4    0    S    19'    IB    2«    ML    80      i Months    6    S    10    IB    25    80    Si    W      Months    8    10    IS    SO    .30 «    SB    4«    M      4 Montlifl    ^    12    17    2a    82    87    4B    :RB      iionthß    10  •I    15  1 _ •    90    25    SB    49    M          Year. .    15    20    25    30    40    SO    SB    100     lì-  X Square la Orì^ Iaaoli.. ILiOcal Bloticec  Ten Cent« pet Line tor eaobíJnMitioB  'J l;e above ijites li^e been «P«^^  1 ublieLcrsof íbéAnterpr$$e and the TncM  , willl'eariliejfdto./.  Bot lfM.1  WPlU  -talm.___________  . Bressta,  InWMSt BttBM Bttj».  Poji Bite«, «un.«t«t W*»««;,  Ground Xteb, ^^«l^^S^'tf^itZSiZ^SSM A. Catarrh, or any otlier amtcttonjy tojgy wh^  V there UAST reanlred, on MAW or  by drug^st« ot 60 oU. Send «tomp tvr «trfnl^.  ' uimrAmaaco ■» TlieWAT801i BALSAMCC, J^inbridge.Gfc  tiippman Bros., wboleeale dtialers Savauiiab, Ga. Lamar, Rankiq , & Lamttr, wholesalo dealerp, Albany, Ga. ___novl4-ly  jVanoauces o be clttatins of Colquitt Oenn ly, iliatbo has aow in Btock.and stor* » al and completo » tort Bi  Dry Goods, Clothing,  Fancy and Family  ötoßeries, No-— tions, ifec.  {'ricos wiUUO mtóeas lotr *« ttiokoof «nybortT The ycrv3 hl>^©atprloc8 will be. paid for »11  kinds of  Goufdry Produce.  Call botorei fing and you •wUl be pleoMd. Sa^ivir. GLé'. MELSON, well known the people of tbis «9anty Is in. the atore, and will ba je hie friends call.  GI'K). W. HERRING.  B. P. TVA^t^EB  lier  n  J  The Uxht SLmCm  My hoy, thon »rttt^ïetnra íbe worlJ moti gö^ i iwTf wlien  F^i^^^i^ the jighvM  tiiay smile with a  _ imi^y  Aftth/twiU dec^o  ^^dlcBl the loD^y  Bat tée^iilih bom« ^ fiwae, V  And pufe^i vestf^l flre. 'Twill baro, Hwilì ^Jmt the «pine, Por nature frede^&^re.  The »éi( of ambition is lempe»t toev  And thy bopbs may vanisb like ^ ioam; But when »alls ate «biver d and ruds jder lòKt, I Theo Idplc to the light of tome.  And there like a jitar through the midnight clotid. Thou shali see beacon bright; For never, tiU shining on thy ehioud Can^e queojC^dit» holy light.  I W ill gild th«;  The iun of fame, name,  But the heart ne'er felt its ray. And fdwbioh's 8mile^> ihit rich on«« iiahn,  Are ^ wintery daj.  And bow cold aud dim those ^eams ¿uust be,  Sbocita life's wretched waadercr cbme.  But, niy boy; when the world is dark lo thee,  TbcntUirn to the light ol home.  To the Colored People ol Ihe Sonili.  From ihe MiiooB Telegiapb.)  Thf» problem of iho 8ouib«tn «i egto is ittier^stisg some of the best intelligence i* ihe day. Like all other questioni» of ►imilar Importoot, il» final solution .will ODiy tee accom^plisbed by the^raceulself.  As eyery mao isihe architect of his own lokunr,Bo every na.'.ionality must be the framer ef its own destiny.  Trui. circnmstatices often impede or diveit the pregrcsRion or retrogression of» people for« lime, but the linroula-ble laws of nature will finally triumph.  I am a freeman and a toimer slave, and although not Imbued with the native powers ol reasoning, and not bljessed with the acquired mtelligence of my superiorbrother in white,"— yet, ibe association and observations of many y< ars has given me an acquaintance with the capabilities, propensities and possibilities ol my own race thajt no man otwhlte race could ever acquire.  Bat I dO: not intend to discuss th^ race problem, but only wish to cast tome hints to my own eolor that, per» haps, will not be amiss.  Our people are novices in the tme ^and enjoymeat of the precious boon of liborty, and are but children in the role ot eitizanshii). We are loo prone to forget that we are in a white man's eonntry. which they purchased with: the priceless blood # i"» noblest pa^ bind our race to poyerty and to shame  'with more tyrannical tenacity th^D all the monarchs of abjeet slavery?/ I  íi^ÚMií^imi^ h^  in  aeek to tat Bòt baritjagé  idea »f oar pe(^ pit in OB iiM^^lgte^ -ot adiu^OB. ^U, at bcü m only t>« bbi a liUgbt aMitlan«« to bs at present la tbfl mareb of progresa.  ituaaold adaga that l|tüa knowledge la a daageroas tbiog.^ Qur people are extremely poor, jaod tbispVecIade« the possibility ot jany more than a tnoderaie idea of Itha rodimeota of a ^^kob ;educatiibB, ilhìM Brácb-doea eót iU Ihem for jibe ^gher ayocatioBB of liic, and inalills Jost enoDgh of the faatidioos into tliem to disgioat tbèm iliiblibairaore a^ial dpties of life, réi]^(í9>iag them helpkts to tbemaolrat áaé i| borden to otbéra.  It doea still more ; it mak«s thjem dissatisfied with themselves, an-l jioNi cliqés tbem to- ieoUojiCB of jealoipay and bitired to tbeir ^ i^ite neighbert, who, of coorse, rank tbena in all ins telleetaal accóÜBplishments. |  4gain, m«ral9ii|^ a.far more correct Iban educa> tion. ^llórale' ' Mitbotit Education ; is resptctable—education without morale is aggravated depravity.  Whatever other advancement mjty have been made by mj race sinjce emancipatioD is more tbaB:Ovei belt^n-r.ed by their retrogression, in morsff. I am ashamed to confess- it but itjis too eyident to cobceal. Obi shoekii^g thought, that darkens the ink that riso cords it. j  TheeurseofGod and the coBtemi>t ot man has always rest«d upon , eveèy natiòhàliiy who regard with indiffe eBce the purity and chastity of women I  Pass before your'.mental viaion tbe panorama of nations, and jou Will find those people holding the ascendancy in progress and power, whose women are most exalted in refinement and cultured in taste.  Whreever virture is dethroned an anarchy of vice prevails. I ■  Who can regard our people with re spect and confidence, when morálity occupies such an indifiereut platie In our standard of manhood and wotùaa hobdy j  What claim can a people make upon society, whoss manhood iave added to their ignorance, preverted morals? I  This weight of turpitade mast be lifted from us, for no intellectukl at* ent eao aver clamate us far eñ'f^gh siip^d sloa¿b» of moral putrilaetion aad debaaehery, to fit us for social companionship, or make us creditable tactorsioL eiyie affairs. ;  Is there manboo^^yid ^womaab«^, enough among as, in the crawde^ ma.ssesof this land ot freedom, to naise a-#oie« against Ae vagraacy, vice and general warthlessness whicb  coscHiiGE wjLSBtnr^^Toir  Mia Cbaraeter Rey^ided <be Airaets iPnitlle mi CbildliMd. -  in  lC^ertJ.Bi]»lette.  always did a man who; does Mot lofè cbildreB. QE%tre is. sdina* tiling morally wroof^ with 8 man. If his tendereat empathies are not awakened by Ibeir innocent prattle, if bis heart does not ccbo their merry laaghter, if his whole natnre does not reach oat in ardecit longings atter their pore tbongbts and onselflsb im-pnltes, be is a soor, c^ty, crabbid old sUck, and the world tinll of children basnonsaforbim.v in overj age and clime, thé best and hbblest men laved children. Even wicked oáén liáve a tender soft spot left in their bcarU for little children. The great' inen of the earth love them. I)o¿s ídve them.— Kamehunekomokim^àbioah, the king of the Cannibal islands loves them. Bare, and no gravy. .Ah, yes, WO all loto children. ;  And what a ploasiffo it is to talk w.Uh them» W ho cai^ eliatter with a bnght-eyed, rosy-cheoked, quick wit-ted little d^rbng, any where from three to five years old, and i not appreciate the pride- Which swells a mother's breast, when she sees ! her little one admired. Ah, yes, to;be sure.  One day, ahcan wel ever cease to remember that dreamy , idle, summer afternoon-^a lady friend • wbo was down to the city on a shopping ezcur^ sioB, came into theaanctom with her little son, a dear little tid^toddler of five bright summers, and begged us to amuse him while she pnrsned the duties which called her down town.— Such a bright boy,so delightful it was to talk to him. We can neyer forget the blissful half hotir we spent looking up in his cea ten nial history.  'No^ listen, Clary,^ we said—his name is Clarence lit^herbert Alen eon de Harchemont C^artithers—''and learn about George Washipgton.  'Whois he?'inquired Clarence, etc.  *LlsieB,\ we said, *he was the father of,his country.'  'Whose country?'  'Ours; yours and mine; the eonfed* eráte union of the American people, cemented with the life blood ot 76, I^red out tipoa ihe attaz» fcf; ou^ ODuntry as the dearest libation to liberty that her votaries ëan ofler.'  'Whodid?'asked Clarence.  There is a peculiar tact in taUclag to children that very few people sess. Now most people would have ^own impatient and lost thehr tem-j^r when little Clarence ariced eo many irreyelent qoeat^s, bat we did •ot. We knew that, however oareless he miight appear at we (Kiuld  soon interest bim^nd he woaldfbe all eyes and ears. So weismiled sweetly —that same s«?eet smile which you may haye noticed on otir photographs, just the faintest npple of a smile  a{>lendid apple treci his father's fairor-it^ and cnt it down, and—* j'Whocafcitdownr ^George did.' . fOhr  ' I-hot iiis father C4»me bome and  séw it the ^t,thing, and— l^awihaibalcbet?' '^o ; saw ^e apple tree. And be said,/Whol^as cot down my fovorite •¿pie tree?! i , |WlMit apple tree?' pGeorgeV father's., And everybody si^d they didn't know anything about iti^and—' f Any thing about what?' rThe apple tree.' |OLi' 1;  --and George came up and beard  tliem talkinis about it-—' .'«Heard w(io talking about it?' i*Heard hik father and the men.' f'What they ta king about?' I \Aboat t^o apple tree.' j 'What ap^le trw ' I'The favorite apple tree that George c&t down.' ii  !»What didlhe cut it down for?' I 'Just to try his little hatchet.' j 'Whose little hatchet?' I 'Why. his [own, the one his father gave qim.' fi i «Gave wbdf  < ' Why, George Washington.' I'Who gavMit to him?' i'His latheridid.' I 'Ohl' V  I George came up and*> he said,  father, I caokot tell a lie, I-'  I 'Who coulda't tell a lie?' I 'Why, George Washington. Ho «aid,'father I cannot tell a lie. It ^as-'  ! iHisfatheribouldn'i?'  _ i ?  j 'Why. no, George couldn't.' i ,'Oh, Gebrgkl oh yes.' I '--It was|I ciit down your  apple  THOMAöVILLE, GA.,  Jveep a liiirge an l.Oimplete Stock of  n  J u  — AND——  ■OFFJNS,  ¡ / '  Both Metalic and Wood.  and so- tbem if yoa ihould need anytbioK in tliclr line ai  VV. M. Smith's Üarriuge Re^sitory.  NIGHT CALLS.  two  r  - iVns\ver«J,by G: W. Herring, doors^lrom Waveriy House, ' Or by 15. P. Walker, at his ri-eidence Cor. Dawbod and Clay Sts.  ^ ■feb2l)-tr ,i ■ ,  W. F. MOSS,  PEÔPEÏETOE  niil:.i.s.  J'Uom.asVille^ - Ost.  All kinda and claseeeofdresEedand andreu e<l imnbor constantly on band ana will be fotd at the very lowest market pricce.  Prices Eegukted by QaaHty.  Lafge lot or 1 inch and inch  .lilways oh band tborongbly dry and vei worked. I^e will furnish buildtnra from.elQs up and will not be nnderadld. Contractors,, bvildcrs and owners aro reqnestied to oome ana Eee us before placing: yoar orders.  All commnnications sboatdbe addretsed to our agent at Thomasville, W. V. M08S, whi> will give any bnsiness placed in hie bands lost: personal attention.  -MCUOXOUGH A CO  OCt24-U  .. -  Practical Tinner, f lumber, Gas and Steam Fitter,  ifoos roofing, guttering, spouUn«, sbe^ixoa work, etc.,in tfie most thorongrad wwkaiS like manner, and puts a GuAaKTEB «  He dop3 either tin, slate or iron rooflng «n, slate, etc.. furnished on short notice. Wul repair and »wj.  Set at mat  riots.  They were the pioneers of the líber«« tics we now enjoy, and right dearly did they pay for thsm.  We are living among the masters who owned us twentyvfive y ear a ago^ and when we consider the humilia-' lions they had to pnbmit to, and the trying experieuce they had to undcr> go, and their sadden transition from wealth te poverty, and the mortifying elevation ot their former slaves to their peerage in citiaenship, we have great reason to ackcowledge, with profound gratitude, their consideration for our race.  To add to the taunts and gibes which our Southern masters received from th^ir cooquenng foe, we have allowed our ignorance to make us dupes to bad »nd de§igQiug men, who have used us for political purpose.  The nobler impulses of our race have been suppressed, and bad men have tried to convince us that the white people were our enemies; but, be it said to the credit of the slave»^ owners, and the Southern people in general, they symathlzo with us in our ignorance, and, notwithstanding the insolence and ribaldry of many ot our race, they have always offered ua ample employment and liberal com-ipensation for our labor, and have pitied and tolerated, rather than censored aad punished, the misconduct and turbulence of many of^ our peer pie.  We have certainly been deceived and misled enough by immigrant tramps and carpet-baggers to have fonnd out our mistake, and it is time we sould cease to be tools, and as cittsens of so grand a country, seek to do our duty and unite with our white fellow eonntry men in trying to build np the country, and thereby advapce and eleyate onrselves.  The white race is and will always be pre^loaiinaot in- this .ccHintry and the^, sbayiog the áac^ai^ in number, wealth and intelUgénce, it is blind folly of our i^ple ta seek preferment or power.  This is ihe home of ourselves and ond our chilren, and the sooner we accept this ibct and go to work ma sensible raailonal manner to make peacé and bamony with our wbtte  fiuuiies, (he sooner we will gam the Respect and confidence of our »aperl* opi. \  We cao provo a disc^ant aod  pause for an answer, fully,^  I aro respect'»  i  C. F.Coopee.  Akc Of Ánr  Sow Co Tell tho  PcvnoB«  IlartforJ Dally Times.  There is a good deal oi amusement in the following magieal table of figures. It willenable y pu to tell how old (he young ladies are. Just hand this table to a yoang lady, and request her te tell yon ia which. column or QOlumns her age is contained, and add tj^e^ier tbe ftgarta.Bt the top of the coltimns in which her age is foundt and yon baye the great secret. Thus, suppose her age to ba 17, you will And that number in thé first and fifth eoK umns; add the first figures of tb^se two eolumas. Here is the magic table:  1 3 Ö 7 9 11 13 15 17  19 21 23 25 27  20 3i 33 35 37 89 41 43 45 47 49 ill  tree; I did— p I 'His fatherjdid?' j *No, no; it was George said this.' ! 'Said he cu^ his father?' I 'lío, no, noijaaid he cut his apple tree.' '! > "  I 'George's a^ple tree?' I 'üTo, no, hia father's.' i 'Oh!' J ^  ! 'Hesaid-'fi I 'His father ^aidb'  Í *2io, no, noii Gcerge said 'lather, I ¿annoi tell a j(ie. I did it with my jittle hatehet.^1 And bis father said, 1 noble boy, I Would rather lose a thou-•and trees Ihán hare yOu tell a lie.' j 'George did?' I »lío, hia father said that.' I 'Said he'd leather have a thousand jlrees?' h  I 'No, no, no|^ eaU he'd rather lose a jlbouaand appjle trees thau—' I 'Said he'd rather George would?' I 'Ko, said he'd rather he would than have bim tellj^ lie.' ; 'Ohi George would rather have bis father lie?' "ji - .  We are patient, atid we love children. but if Mrs. Caruthers, of Arch ptreet, badu'tjcome and gother prodi-igy at that criiical juncture, we don't  4 Wtsj T&eyM«nrlede  ]^o6tal eards wero senfc oat to ^e ma^ed monof a > small town in Wcitern Hew Xotk with the inqoi ry, sWb? did yon marry F Wo giTO a few of tbo responses:  'That's what I have been toying lorleleven ¡years to find oat.  *Married to get even wiib bar mother bol never have. '¿ecaose I was too laay to wor]L  LV/  'Becanse Sarab told me that five •other yoang men had proposed to her. a*  The. old man tboaght eight years coortin' was almost long enoi^h. i . B.'  'I was' lonraome and melandiol-ny.^ and wanted aome one to make me^ively. N. R—She niskra me very lively. - D.*  'Î was tired of boying iee cream and c^ndit's and going to theatres and chnrcb, and wanted a rest« Have ma|ie money. J. O.'  ÎPlease don't stir me np. J.'  I tbou^^ht she was one among a thoasaod ; now I sometimes think she ia a thousand among one.  'Itbink it was beoaon I was cross eyed; now I am afflicted witli two pairs of oro» eyes dcdly. ^ . PETEB,'  'Bseause I did not havo the ax-peclenee I have now. O.'  The governor was going Ji> give meibis foot, so liook bis daagbter'e hand: H.'  '|thoogbt it woold be cheaper thab a breaob-of-promise sait i A. 0.'  'ghat's the same fool qu.68tioD my fridids and neighbors ask me. 1 ; O. H.*  'Beoanse I had mbro money than I k^w what to do ^ wltb. Kow I hai^ more to do than I bfive money with. B.D.'  'I wanted a TOmpanion of the op-pKJigte sex. P. S.—She is still op-poMte A.'  'Don't mention it. F.'  'Had difficoltj unlocking the docfr at nijght and wanted somebody to Ifet me in. Bob.'  'i was embarassed, and give my wifè the t>enefit of my name so that I coald take the benefit of her nsQia signed to a check.  § 'SCBO^S.'  'Btfoanse it is jaat myJnok. S ■ ^ - V. J.'  'i didn't intend to go to do it  3 a'  'Î yearned for company. We nd# have it all the time, EABL.'  'pave exhausted all the figures in th^ arithmetic to figare oat an answer to your question; between ma|tiplioatioa and division in the fdi|ilj, and distraoticn, in addition, the'answer is hard to arrive at.  OiiD MAN.' 'I married to get thé best wife in th^wolrd. SiHON.'  'ilp30ias81 asked her if she'd haVja me. She eaid she would. I thi^k she's got me. Bliviss.'  fiome SlgntÉ of IltXnélí.  io be struck by ligbfoing  on  Monday.  brVaWag rcT,«-."«,;^« lii. "a, «i;-.-; I "f «ve aU B.>.i»gtoo co«^ have puU-1 ^  ' ed U8 out of t^at snarl. And as Clar-' " ^  ¡enee Fit2berb5?rt Alencon de Marche^ i mother gave her.  imont Caruthr'rs pattered down the f^n dawn stairs with the par-  stairs, webeaid him telling his ma lor Itoveon Tuesday.  about a boy vijio had a father named 1 To fepiculatp with other people's  George, and he told bim to cut do^n money and get caught.  an apple tree^and he said he'd rather % ^Hi" «-^It in the oofiee i>t a man  tell a thousand lies than cut down an | carving knife.  apple tree.  ?îeeded Moré Than Ope.  John, do yen remember when we i^d to swins on my fatbèr's front guter •Yes, Maria, I do.' *And tbem.X)n ossd to look^ beanUfal. Jobo.' Ot did. Maria.'  'iUid the stara wsre so brighi' They were»' . ,  wonder if the moon ia so bsaaj-tìfol and the stars jost as brighi now »9 they were theo, John 'I presume tbey are. Maria.' •Thèn wby can't we swing on the front^ gate now ab j look at the moon and the etars and the blaa night skies, with their fieecy clouds, as ,wé osed to do (beni  ^We can» Maria, if we wanl io.'  John, let nà go ont to tbd firont gate for awbile, and see "lÌ it will seem anytbing like it osed to.' ;  'AH rìght. Maria.Yoq go onÌ and try it awbile»and il yoo like iti maybelH tako a tamat ii'  Bat Maria thQugbt bim too mach of a bruto to do anytbing of thè kind. -  57 Ì9 61 63  p Stoves, Ranges and Furnaces, I troublesome factor in poÚt¿k'bat«»7er ike Smoke stacks for engines, Hv_______I-j —. "  besome a powerful an^d.. rnlij^^ ele-meat;  This government IS the ofTuprinf of th« anit^ blood and . brains the  over B. D. Fudgtfs Store i past,  '' mid wliat stopendoos folly for an illi  or cbimney flues, do pump work,^ etc., etc.  He màkes iirices tosait the tlmù aad Mlle. ts a sbate of patronage. « »»mc  Office  jaaS-tf  57 Ì9 61 63     2    4    8    16    32      3    5    i)    17    33 1      6    . 6    10    18    34 1      7    7    U    19    35 (      10    12    12    20    36}      11    13    13    21    37      14    14    14    22    38      15    15    16    23    39      18    20    '24    24    40      19    21^    26    25    41      22    22    26 '    26    42      23    23    27    27    43      26    28    28    ^    44      27    29    29    29    45      30    30    30    m    m      31    31    31    31    47      34    36    40    48    48      35    37 .    41    40    49      38    38    42    60    50'      39    39    • 43    51    61      42    44    44    62    52      43    45    45    58    63      46    46    46    34    64      47    47    47    56    65      60    52        56    56          53        67          5i    54    68    58    ^      55    55    59    59    59      68    GO    60    60    60      69    61    61    61    61      62        62    .•2    62      63    «3    63    63    63     sunlight, and checked by- lines of tender sadness, just before the two rads of it pass each other at the back o! the lieck.  And so smiling we "Vent on,  'Well, one day George's father-*  •George who? asked Clarence. 'George Washington. He was a little boy then, just like you. One day his father-^'  * Whose father?' demanded Clarence, with an encouraging expreesioo of iui teree^  'George Weshiogton^ this great man 'we were telling you ofl One day [X^orge Washington's father gave him a little butchet for a ' ; ^ 'Gave who alitile hatchet?' the dear 'thild interrupted with a gleam of bewitching intelligence. MoSt men would have betrayed signs of impatience, but we didn't. We know how to talk to children. So «re went on. *George Washington. His-i' 'Who gave hiarthe little hatchet?' 'His father. And his father—' •Whose lalherr 'Geerge Washington's.' '©hi'  'Ye8,Géorge Washington. And hie father told him—' 'Told who?' •Told George.' 'Db, yes, George,'  And we went on, just as patient and pleasant as you conM impgihe.— We teok op the story rigbt^^én the boy interrupted, for we.co.ttfdsee ihat he was just crazy to hear the end of it We said:  Tlie Same Old Bode.  Atlanta Censtitntion.  There ooce lived in a neighboring town a well-to-do Irishman who kept a grocery store. Bie varied bis business bj parcbasing lint cotton. In packing and baling this cotton on one occasion be made bold to in-olade a grindstone. The bale was firwarded to Oharleston, where it was raid and part of the proceeds osed to porcbase a bogsbeM of si-gar. It so bappeoed that tbe man from whom the sugar nas ord^ed was tbe porobaser of the ''mised-packed" bale. Probing aroond with bis cotton gimlet, be toand the gtindstone, and at odo3 proceeded to bary it in the hogshead of sugar. In due time it was returned to the grocer. Months afterward, while the grocer's eon, who was also his clerk, was scooping satcar oat of tbe hogshead, be struck something hard. Uncovering it, he found a. grindstone, and called bis father's attention to it.  'Faitb, 'tia the same old rock 1' Ithe old mau exclaimed. 'Bemim-bar, Moike, honesty's the bist policy.'  ----—» .r«» ■ - ■■  The Farmer's Boy«  The country boy or girl is fsce to face with practical realities. He sees how slowly money ia made on tbe farm; he is taught from youth ap the need of economy; bo has the nature of saving first explained to bim every day in the week; he is not exposed to tbe temptation of the Oiloon or ball-room, and he is not so much of u lady's man before be has occasion to iiso a razor on bis downy cheeks. He may be a tnfle rude; be may not feel eas; in company, but in the long, closely contested race of life it is the chap that trudges to school barefooted in summer and fitogas in wibter, wboae mother cuts liis bair with tbe sheep sbeera, vvUo lua ia tbe chap that goes to the city school with tbe Btarcbfcd shirt front and fancy bUp  •irbreak the mirror your wife's I f«"' bead is shaved wilb  " ' tbe lawn-mower at the barber shop. Socb has oar observaocd, and we think we koow what we are talking about.  p. BELLE VOORHEES.  Gor- Dawson and Oalhoun *  OFPICE HOURS: From 0 to 12 m. and from 3 to 5 p. m.  W; BRU D.  Corner Broaa auti r ¿etcher Streets,  acflS^Wy. . .  A. R. JOSEa. 1». 3, rnASBLUS  JOta & ^ANSPN,  Attpnieiw at Law Beal Kstate Agents and Loan Brokers.  ilLUa^, iir<3M  Keld»â  K  T' S. DEKLE, M. D.  Office in the Bajres Building.  B^dence, corner College Avenue and Magnolia street ~  Telephone communicatiou No. 2'» ¡0 night calls. jaii aUly  Ätforaéy- at  TflOMA8VItLB,ôâ,  Prompt Jktteaçion givea to íUI bMiue»» •d to him  „Ofsaoo-  Street. |aBlS-l7  >Ib Uéym IlaiMlnj;  P. HAN EL,  -Acttomey at l^ixw AND  INSURANCE AQBKr. ,  OFFIOKoTCr Wall » ^rc.  W.D.MITCHKLU «.O. M ITCH El i  MITCHELL & MITCHELi  Attornevs at La«^  THOMAS VILLE. ^ - i A  mar Sl-I  J H> COYLE, Di l). S  Resident Dentist,  Offemnie eerrlcca to tbe ciUtcBa 01 TLomat vtUo aadvicLnlty .  Oace hours from »A. M. to I f. la, and fro a to 6 P.M. Office on JaokeonatiWM. api 13  Isaac Griffin  - ■ *  Next door to U, W.riO AjjUro.'s :-M jr.<, liro.i-l Stre«t,  Tlioma,«ville, - Cirix.  Mnnufactarer and lUaicr lu  Saddles, Bridles, Httraoss, Hor«u Boots, WeitfhtH autl Trniii-, ers' Ecjaipiigt'.  fillo wlil also keep oij liand;» lisjij. ): aJi.i i-ii ic varied aiisoruuent tluiu hu» ij<en kei>i im Uiss city herotoiore, em bracing  Lap llobee, ilorso Hhvnlwt». Bridle Bits, SpuTa.Cuiriajio, Buì;-gy, Hiding and Team WhiiJi, Lashes, Comb», Brufshec, Collare, flame« ftinl Chains. Thti  Celebrated Standing Odllar'  Alway« on Uanfl, and «il other go<>.ie be io(f to thetraat'. all of wnkii he vtiU-:,vii  X.OW for CASH.  Bepairing Neatly aDcl Promptly Daij.-. octa-.lm  1887.  , ILLUHTllA Ti':!)  yonr  WordbB of Wisdom.  if  L'ibor is ti^iB girdle of ojanlinesi,  Mncb of otir waking experience. ; is bnt a dreaoi in the daylight.  Study the «¿race of silence when provoked. Besolve to defer reply to another day.  An open niind, an open band, and an open heart will find everywhere an open door.  Tbe best way to'gain a good reputation is to endeavor to be what you desire to appear.  ThQ charities that soothe and beal and ble89, Ua^ ittered at tbe feet of men like flowers.  A man l|bBt slndietb revenge keepetb bis own wou&ds green which other^se wdhld heal and do well.  The real tilings are inside. The real world is|ihe inside world. God is not op, n|)r doaa, but in tbe midst 1  'îo 8. e H bi'l coHeotor over riiiJj' shouliUr on Saturday.  I'o .irr s:n of snakes after drinking ciiifer iu a prohibition tc^ra.  To be one oí thirteen al the tabfe wl^n there is only enoogb tor six.  ^o call a bigger man tb&n yonr-sell herd names ftOT day in tbe  To mairy on Wednesday a girl who praotioes wilb ten-pound dumb bells.  To bet sll your money on a uorse wl|eo tbe driver has bet bis money ooi another.  'Ab, madam,' be Btid asho irxkend-frd a band to help her up, 'I never saw a more graceful fall. Yon threw up yonr urmn like a born ac^ tress, yoar little feet indnls^ed in s ebnffl'j, and down you wsttled with I a swan-like mov meot which was! soperb.' •Beally, fiir ^  'Honest Injan, madam. And hepickod up a No. 7 robber! wbioh^had been flung from ber left foot, turned biB back to a dent in tbe enow which looked as if a cottage had betm upset there, ond, raising his buLand making a profound bow he toèk bis leave,  ' ilarper'n lia^&r oamtlnef tli« t:-. íné '-alur» aofl il»e anrttart uiui:ffaiuí<;e wiih ih.  lateatûubloi}! aa4 Uke iwoii iit«fa! íai;,!íy r^JOM. lt»Mim<st,í*o«m». r^my^ an  bjr UJ» b^t writo-s, ao<J It« l,om<trmu »kvu ln-t ore üiuttrpa*í«fí. Itj vu ttu--  ?inett«, deooiavt*« art. ¡ i .^ìi  UHir»actm,co9k&ry.ti£.,maktt n «tó^ la ercrr bouto-hula. ItAi^^ia^^í Um-plalMaad patter».«h<<«t »ow^Um.m« . j,. able ladiet Ui «aire laaujr Uta«» tut- oyet .>f ««u-bf bciat iUtu^ 'jwu 'Jttmsouk^Ti. KataUa* m adwJit^ i¿f it« ¡un  ooüld títoik tfee oifJti iattidiiiü«  while  Srií^^pi to sit on a chtir that I f^l^^í^n^ ® f ' I tt^Per's bazur  so&ëonebas removed when y<m - «x-1 Harper's Msksz  wère not looking.  ^ m. P'l'» I tJm-un./ be eaid, rabbiog hi,  chin in a sfjf-satis&ed way, 'I think I could marry either cither one of tbe girls if I felt disposed to mska  Harper's Periodicak  rzn TKAK;  Hille brotb« Who saw yoá ~ kirs ao-otier little bo^'s fitter.  |I Qsed to think that men bad an ainifuiiy easyJime," said Mra. Franks 'bqt I've Ranged my mind, and hereafter I'm going to tak« all ihe To bo tborooghly good-natured I csès of Charly X possibly mo. Yon  I told  'Well, I never / remarked Damley, as he tried to bits tioot^b • muffin the other morning at breakfast  'Wbat'fl the matter f ioqoired the landlady.  This bread is awfolangrily replied pamlay.  fWt^m^&eUttbMd than yon •re^' was the fraeoag tmpoaae.  ^l^ülenoö t^t came ovtrtbe breakfast table wm «o deep thu^ it pnnphod % b<ae |s tli»edi«r door.  ■ 11 la.  doer of joors isa dog of part^B^j/  BsiIey-''t«i^iBdMd. How did yoa eome to notioe it f*  B»gl^—^Well, Sé todc part of my ooat-taa yiptorfjiqr. If yoo think be baa any nae for the other m bring it axoosd. ;  'And he told him that—'  'Who told hiw whatr ciafènce [ Jays do gratification broke in. 'Why George's lather told George.* •What did he tdl him?' •Why, that's just what I going to tell yoa; He told btm-=' ^Wbotoldbim?' -George's father. He—' 'ÎFhatibr?' «s^  •Wby, so he wooÛte't do what | be told him not to do. He KM him---' 'George told himP  -No, bU father told George—' Ì  and yet avoid being imposed opoo, shows great strength of cbairacter.  Teach selfldecial and make it« practice pleainrable, and yon oreate for theworl4^a de&tioj more sub lime than6vc(r iiffiued from tbe braiit dl tbe vnldesi dreamer.  It is a certain sign of an ill-h^ari ^ _____  to be inclined to d<»(unation. ^oey {latie»—long after I retired. He had ^ho are barinless and innocent can | to^o to his club, and it seems ho  tbe eflort.'  •Y^,' replied bis friend, with i affirmative of rí-cógciíioo .and interrt^ative n^ation. 'Ye», 11 hi ok I could. Yoo  an an  see  l (ßj  Hirer's Magazine 4 (/j  Harper's Weekly 1 r/j  Harper's Yoani? FeopI« 2 W  Harper's Franklin ¡i^iw^rt J.^brav  ry, one year (02 ùninb^r^) 10 (^j User's Handy Berks, î y:ur, Numbers,  Pottage Free to «jj «ubfecriî^r« the IJolvtd ötale» aud t'ariada.  Ut  some wood and I ^^ ge^-^g eloog toward tbe r some. Well, I ' ^^^ ooi onwilliog to  ■ TtM VeiSA«« «»itisa Ilastskí. Uî'.^ wîiî, tal îfBÂΫ» tijf «S'Jj iKàs.. W.»:^»  no m-ú U  IkíA im itsìmìrìt/tr tri^ji«« tjfm;^.«:.*^ »ii.», tua Sa«ïl«r sw »Sur ti« rtcítíj^ ,  Voììimjf* «î Hiuy*,'» lut  s^, tb^ other morning Obtsries wo wanted to|>e sure and order  I #ait9d all day, and that wood I I ««i^  dl^'i^mv and I was almost an-l »ff. vfery P^bf,' g^S'Sr^^^^  eontiooed hts frussd, and '  versatioB abrapll? conclodei;  gjeft Ust, ssid I, he baa forgotten it, ICbaxles didn't come home until  To^iajse. CiAUi Caamirx  'Can yoa tell m© aoythiog abost the postage-itamp flirtation f a^s ! a snbscriber. Ctrtsinîy. When to  msei^f ti  »slViU« ív» hy j-vt-íí^íí^, f is  —.w „W in that way;! «ás detained not:! i^fte? midnight I . ----------- —  bnt it ever âKses from a neglect ol 1 w« ¿wfolly restl^ and kept, 1 ^ J^^ ^^ pats two «iamiís what is landsble in one's seif and | io bis sleep, saying every | Jg ® one-^aœp leil^r, be lòves yoa.  •o impatient of seeing it in ahotb-1 omm ia • «luto. »Give me acothw IW^®® ^ pöts one stamp on a two-er. 1 voffli of chip«.' Ho yoali®®P ^^^^ ^^ jony and  ajé lîsaewlW fcismind was trotó>-l™® ^^ ^ «»^to-  lel^^a^^ wood. How moeb jg^Qg^»^® ^^^ acoiber.  Bsckwoodsji School Teacher ( to I ^^ f^a Pm ^ 1 ^ reœarkafcle okarreces ia N&w-  boy)-Howi^ have yoa gone? Sata^ tótoW m^^  B^AioTinever b«n jery far. Bö^®«! toSs^o^ ^ '»^««^ö  »boat ten miltf from home I reckòn. I t^bc^lier Mœ wîtboot dotoe home I ^^^ ^^ btisband that t&er© was Teacher—I^'mean bow far have I ¿i|siida.* [ ® oßder tbe^ t>ed. Â&tr being  Bèwi'tatftow «ïwflid h* t » i. ^y « < ç tfe^ t^tíía ifftíí, M -.iAfeo« -ta  ufit&fAta fJSJí-y-Ui* »-iteíTc«. I trnst mrhi9ut Um ttpt^ '> vi tí at Bt^Jikw. A4.CÍW» '' -  HAEfiííiA awfjtmím. -'--.-w tví» ;  líolJse»  ji  'Yes; told him tluìtlk* fui with the hatchet-«? 'Who must he carefìalf 'George mnst' 'Ohr  •yet ; i^Hst he càrefiil hatehei-^^ 'Wbat hatchet?' •Why, d«»r*e'i.' —  Oh!'  beque-  yoa advanced!in yo^ book?  Over ibr this here pi^or«  Oarriilla, Oei.  ^ ^---------------- reqi^ed u îm^ eis» timet, to I The Gem AmoEg the Pmea.  ^... -------, ,,-- same is WaUkiil, lao't | arose and k^ked, and tb^re was af ^ «luuun  ISsedier—Why that's where adted Bobbyf loiao. Toia is thé ^cosd time ibis  ftril lenon begins. Yoaeaa*tsp^l, I ]WettkiO^ QompÍMo^tíy r»-Ibêêb&ppemâ mmi: th& d^fetgi pf eaa yoa? I tiait yôong man. t America.  Boy—Eeii ^11 dog cat, bot I i ^^ too B'tnpgîe^îî^es on Krd an'l  un  •Bscinse ÄtarOar» toîd Ethel Bi^âneon tliatyóii would be • elee yáang ramsi to â^ a dog alier if it tor joor nuse.'  with ij  T««sh«—Y'oa little rsscal, yoa moel noi taUt tthat way. Did y<mr father ever be|lr yoa talk that waj ! Boyw^Nbmé^ 1 > ; t^ «—"————---  'Yes. With the hatcbet^aodnotHll^^ ^  him8elfmUiit,ordropitto1Ìia ^ »^l toif «Why doyoa want  temorleaveitoaten the grass alU taì^ night So George went aroond esil4 to'for ba!é dJÌ E!  tingeveiything he coald retcH ^ becoaldn'fc  ^hatehet ^nd et lui cune to the ^imd, . | mj tìnrfmab  Xbe great^t mental effan that • dode makes ¿s when be bas to âàéf-mine wli^Nr to take oal bts eai^; or Ms omt^lk.  X&e most &^irm«d ' ei^ifi wBi fake yoar word for it if yoa pmnt » pm tóbhhmá and teö Mm it si mä&i.  TikiiUmsm w'mwf tmxi% "A httjBptmn Jmm^ M,  «Bâ la»m UiJg, m^fSm&lämiitm^M^.--. SA m sut^ U-9êimm&t »m  . it a-» a «l'i«  ífsisiií-s;» í^RjS'  «Jj a^-i sâ«  ■i m^P^mm m mm âsé m» «^st  SW mWtCMSÍÍ|4|»«|ísaíÍÍ f..« •  _ in Pimi^mm, î$ ymm ^ bas josi be^ mairie^ ?m few giiii be broogbi to eat ^ïï'  tlR* «arcitt, »«»läse' ÄÄis,; Ut^^mrcijnmk». ,. €mrm§m4ime» «i&dáíiáfisíá  m %¡» wiisitg, ■  MX!, O. B, & 4mm* ■ t^ïpseÔWKH»-   

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