Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Thomasville Times Newspaper Archive: February 2, 1878 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Thomasville Times

Location: Thomasville, Georgia

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Thomasville Times (Newspaper) - February 2, 1878, Thomasville, Georgia                                 Offlc9¿W :Bl»iM, "tñ !ai)Blnty»é'*7N©ir  í : TfaTaAiwy j Acks&n b treet.  Publißlied every Saturday Morning. J3y .Tolin Triplett.  OM-: YEAR,.......  >]X MONTJIS......  TliKLi: MOMil^,  .....$2.00  ..... 1.00  ......w  All Subscriptions must be paid invariably in avance. No discriininfttion in iavor of anybody.  Tue paper will be stoppeci in all instances at lie expiration of tiie time faid for, uniese súber i piioii h are previously rene wed.  ADYEKTIi'JNG IIATE,S', The following rates have been as^Teed upon between the publishers of Thk Thomasvillk Ti.NiJCs . and Southern Enterprise, and will be strictl}' adhered to:  sirs: 1 m.2 m.'sm. 4 m. m . 6 m 12 m.  f'$.>00'$800,1000 12 oc:14 00T500'$2000 i; 8 00'l2 00 1500 :G0C 18 00j2000 : 25 00 lOOO'lSOO 18 00 20 00 22 00 25 go; 30 00 4 12 00 10 00:20 00 2200:2500:3000! 35 00 5: ;i4 00 18 00:20 00 25 00 30 00 35 001 40 00 i;':i5 00 20 00 25 00 30 00 35 00'40 00: 45 00 8' 18 00 25 00 30 00 35 oc'40 00 45 00 50 00 I'ul 25 00 30 00,35 00 40 00,45 00 50 50 00 00 cjI ,35 00,40 00 45 00 50 oc 55 OO'oo 00 100 00  in cr. a  'J: m  n i 1.00^2.00 o.00 4.00' 5.00 C.OO ^■.00 10.00 15.00 ■2: 2.UÜ' Í.00 5.(K) 0.00 8.00 Ì0.00 12.00 IS.OO 20.00 ! 3Í 3.00 5.00 6.00 S.00 10.00 Î2 00 15.00 20.00 25.00  VOL. V.  THOMASVTLLE, GÀ., SATUßDAY  NO. 47.  Extract from Byron.  Exlfctence may be borne, and the deep root Of life and stiffer^nce make its firm abode In bare and de8<3aie l^osoms: mute The camel labours with the heaviest load, And the wolf dies in silence,—not beBtow'd in vain should such example be; if they, Things of ignoble or of savage mood, Endure and shrink not, c ol nobler clay May temper it to bear,—it is but for a day.  All suffering doth destroy, or is destroy'd Even by the sufferer; and, in each event Ends:—some, with hope replenish'dand re-buoy'd,  lictum to whence they came—with like intent,  And Avcavc tlieir \\ eb again: 'omc, bow'd and beut  M'ax gray and gba-tly. witliering ere their time,  Aud perish with the reed on w hit h they leant;  Some seek devotion, toil, wargood oi' crime, ¡\ccordmg a- their souls were form'd to sick or climb:  Jiut ever auon of grief subdued There comes a token like scorpion "a sting, Scarce seer, but w ith fresh bitteraess imbue« 1; And slight withal may be the things w hich bring  Eack to thejicart the weight which it would fling  A,-ide for ('ver; it may be a sound— A tone of mu>i<', summer's eve—or spring, A llowcr-the w i:id- the ocean—w hich shall wound,  Striking theelectric chain w liercwith we (iuickl\ bound:  And hov, andwhy\vc know noi. ix)r can trace  lloiiie to its cloud thi> lightningof tlie mini:. Jiut feel the thock renew'd nor can efface The blight and blackening -svliich it leaves behind,  "^'hicli out of things fatiiiliar, undesigu'd, AVheri lea.-; -we deem of such, call- up tovie\\-The spectrcr, ^s■hom no exorcism can bind. The cold—the clufnged—perchance the dead— anew  The juourn'd the loved, the lo>t—too many : yet how feivl  A SQUARE IS ONE lA'CH. Notices in local column will be measured separately-no space counte l less than a square —;ind ch;ifged 50 per cent at'.ditional on regular ailverti.sing rates. Notices ot Concerts, E.-cbibitions, Professional Ajiiiouncements, cCc ., ¿jc.,ofone square  or less, one insertion............'..............^B.Oy  Joinuiunications of a pol tical character, of '¡'.•kswritten in advocacy or defence of the ofaspirants to ofttce.lo cents jier line.  Announcement of Candidates ^5.00. Cash. \'early contracts will be made with Merchant« ior a certain space in our advertising cohuuns, subject to a charge oi style and mutter at their option. I'his wii.l be the best and c lioapest inrestmentifbr pai ties who advertise largely and trequentlv.  WllEK BILLS ABE DUE  A! advertisements in thisfaperare dueatany iiiic after the first insertior. of the same, and Kvill I'c collected at the pleasure of the propri-stors. unless (;therwise arranged by contract. ~IiATES AyiJ RULES EOH LEGAL AD-VEIITISIJS'J.  Shcrifi 's sales, per levy........................... $5 00  Mort^a'^^e Fi Fa sales per square,......  Citations lor letters of Admiuistration,......  " " Guardianship...............  qdicatioufor Dismission from vidiuin-  :st ration...................... .................. J  plicatioii lor Dismission from Guardi- t  aiiship................................................. I  ip)>iic;Uio-n for leave to !-elI ^.and..............  i ales of Tj.'uid, Iter square...........................  j.ales of Perishable property, per scjuarc ....  .N'o.ticcs to Del'tors and Credit.irs.................  l<'oreclosnrc of rvlortgage, per square.........  Eriray Notices.30 days...............................  /Ipplictition fur Homestead.........................  6 00  6 00  B 00  e 00  5 00 5 00 5 00 5 00 4 00  The Old Suliscriber.  i^.ega l a dvekt1sem¿-nts.  ^id;'.iiii;-trat' rs. E.xecuiors or (• u;ir.'iiano aw ;-aK'S ol I/a:id by .\diuinirt-rati>r>, Executo''s (>r Gnurdi.'uis, are reijuired bv law to beheld o'l the ilrst Tuesday in the ni )nih, between the hours id'tcii o'clock ill tlie U renoon, ;iiui three in the afternooti, at tbe Cour:. llousein which t !io proport ,v situated A'o ices of t,hese sales mu.-^t l-'o giVou in :i ptil/.ic gazette forty days pre\'i(ius to the dtiyof siiles.  Sail," ol Per.Mjual Property :—Not iccs cl the i^aic 1 1' peisoi.til iiroperty must be ciiveiiat least lei! da^•s pre vious to the day of sale.  Estate Debtors taid Creditor.-¡—A'orlce to />i'b(or.^ auTi Creditors ol' a:i Cbtato must be publisbcii forty days.  Court of Or(iiuary Leave to SellNotice that ■uqdicrit ii'ti wil'. lieuiade to tlie Court of < >rdina-r> for leave to Hell Lands, n^u.-^i be ¡lublished oiu Dawi'ilc for fotir weeks.  ,MiiiiniiL7.itors and Guardi inship :—Citations f.ir Letters of Ai.iunuistr;ii ion must be published thirtv davs; for Dismission frc in .administration, m'onihly i'or three months—fo.- Disiui.'^sion from (i uardiaiiship., 40 days.  Forecloseure of Mortgairo :—Rules for Fore losure ofMortgiige must bepi;lili.>^hed monthly or four months.  fi  OX^R  Job Printing  Department.  Having supplied ours-elf with new  . MaclilneJ  Prp  J  .rr THE  Ltatest and Most Improved Patterns  Wc are now prepared to execute in as  ■UAion S^YJLB  AXD AT AS  a-i can Ijo had iu the Siate,  B fORK  He cameiwearily up the sanctum steps yesterday afternoon^ and turning tb ; waste basket upside down sat down upon it Avitb a sigh that might have been cut up into tornadoes and whirlwinds enough to go around half a dozen agricultural counties. He had a weary look about him as though he had been trying to die and couldn't find a doctor. His coat was ragged and patched here and there with a prosperous and clannish community o.* cockle burrs. His boots, water proof variety, were so arranged that if you stuck them in the river the water would run out faster than it would run in. AVe asked hovv" he fared, aucl he glanced savagely at a Kansas paper among our exchanges, before he answered sadly:  "Well, pretty miserably, thank yc. Ye see, times come iu pretty hard, and it was pretty hard slidin' to get along. I either just had to sell the six dogs, or cut down the expenses in some other way, -«nd so I stopped the paper. I miss it powerful bad the first few weeks, then I kind o' got used to it. Borrowed it once an' a while here and there, but folks didn't appear to want to lend their papers, and so I finally lost sight of  it altogether.  Then trouble begun right  or ALL KINDS,  SCCh AS  Cat.;!.  Dili Heads,  Circulars,  Letter Head«,  Statement^  Note Ileadi.  IuTi:atiou Cards,  ViJitmg Card«,  Hati Bill  Legal Blanks,  aad erery other description of Job Work,  Our Stock and Material is I New and Complete and every & effort will be made to give sat-T isfaction to all who favor us I will? their patronag«.  oil: The first thing I knew. I was arrested and fined twenty dollars for violating the game law. You see the thing has been changed a little, and I didn't know nothing about it, but the judge said as how ignorance wasn't no excuse in these days when the State was so full of papers that you couldn't fire a stone out of the winder without hittin' an editor. Then in a week I was arrested and fined twentv dollars for violating  y O  the fishery law, and when I begged and said I didn't know notliin' about it, the judge asked me where I was raised, and remitted me two dollars of the fine for me to take the paper with. But I kinder thought I coulda't get in any more scrapes, and I sorter liung on to the two dollars, In about three days after, I was took up again and fined four dollars and costs for huntin' on Sun-diiy; and I hope I may die if I know-it was Sunday, an' I bad to sell the gun to get out of the jug. Then a fellow came along and bought every grain of corn I had iu the crib, for six cents less than I found next day it was worth in the market : then I lost two of the best cows you ever saw, and they was took and advertised, and all the time I wiys huntin' ail over the whole country for 'em, an' when I found 'em at hist, the costs was more'n the cows was worth. The taxes come due an' I didn't know it, an' the farm was sold, an' I had big costs to pay before I knowed. a word about it, and every week since I stopped the pa-Der I've paid ont more money to xeep out of trouble than would keep me in newspapers all my days. Put my name on the list."—i/oR--  A Quaker Woinan'& Sermon.  "My deal- friends there are three things which I veiy much wonder at The first is, that children should be so foohsh as to throw stones, clubs and brickbats up into fruit trees to knock down fruit;if they let it alone it would fall itself. The second is, that men should be so fool ish ag^'to go to war and kiU each other, if let alone . they would die themfldlves. And third and last thing I wonder at is, that young men should be so unwise as to go after the vonng women, if fhey womd stay at home the yoang women womd come after them."  Popping: tbe Question.  One of the Danbury young men who has occasionally escorted a young lady home Sunday evenings, and went in for lunch, after performing both services last Sunday night, suddenly said to her:  "Do you talk in your sleepV" ""Why—no," she answered in surprise. .  ''Do you walk in your sleep?" he next inquired. "No, sir."  He moved his chair an inch closer and with increasing interest asked: "Do you snore?"  "No," she hastily replied, looking uneasily at him.  At this reply his eyes fairly sparkled. His lips eagerly parted and he briskly inquired:  "Do you throw the combings from your hair in the wash basin?"'  "What's tliat?" she asked, with a blank face.  He repeated the (juestion, although with increased nervousness.  "No, I don't," she answered in haste.  Again his chair went forward while bis agitation grew so great that he could scarcely maintain hLs place upon it. as he further asked:  "Do you clean out the comb wher. you are through?"  "Of course I do,' .she said, s'laring at him with all her might.  In an instant he was on his knees before her, his eyes ablaze with flame and his hands outstrcctched.  "Oh, my dear miss, I love yon," he passionately cried. 'T give my heart up to you. Love me and I will be your slave. Love me as j love you, and I will do everything on earth for you. Oh, will you take me to be 3'ourlover, your husband, your protector, your eveiything?"  It was a critical moment fur a voung woman of her vears, Ijut she was equal to the emergency, as a woman generally is, and she scoo|)-ed him in.  Pliysiogiioiii V.  They ^^cre iu a railroad coacb, journeying to Chicago. On tae op-• posite seat was a man of commanding figure, massi^•e brovr and tlrjught ful expression.  "^Yhat a line couiitcnance. Jame;^, I wish I knew his occupation."  "Maybe he's a lawyci-. ..hiielia." "No, he's not a lawyer. The Lord writes a plain hand, and there is too much benevolence in tlint fac: foi- ;i lawver."  "He mav be a banker r" "Not a bit 01 it. A mail witli such a hea-'-enly expression couldn't content himself with monev-getting.  I- o o  His aim in life is higncr than -iliat.'' "Do vou think he's an edito:.' ?'' "An editor, with such a face ?""■— An editor saying hard things about everybody ridiculing long dresses and abusing his mother-in-law V An editor, cutting and slashing his enemies, skinning public men indiscriminately' and mercilessly slaughtering his best friend for the sake of a three line paragraph? No, -James, he's n, philanthropist. He's a Christian minister or a learned professoi', .spending his life for the good of mankind. His face plainly indicates that he is all that is noble, puro and true."  "I guess vou're right. Amelia. I'll  O C '  take vour word and his face foi it.'' Xi the next station an incjuisitive farmer took a seat beside the man with noble brow, and asked him about his vocation. Amelia held her breath and listened to the reply:  "I keep a sttloon and meat-shop. Mv wife sells beer and I do mv own butcherin'."'—Ln<ja11J^'nar<?>.  Taxes on Editorial Faitli.  One of the greatest trials of the newspaper profession is that its members are compelled to see more of the shams of the world than any other profession. Throngb every newspax^er office, day after day, go all the weakness of the world; all the vajiities that want to be puiied ; aU the revenges that want to be reaped; all the mistakes that want to be corrected ; all the duU speakers who want to be thought eloquent ; ail the meanness that wants to get its wai-es noticed gratis in the editorial column, in order to save the tax in the advertising column, ah the men who want to be set light who were never right; ali the crack-brained philosophers with stories as long as theii- hair, and as gloomy as theii- finger nails in mourning l>€cause bereft of soap ; all the bores who come to stay five minutes, but talk five hours. Through the editorial and reporto-rial rooms all the foUies and shams of the world are seen, day after day ; and the temptation is to beheve in neither Gk)d, man, nor woman. It is no surprise to me that in this profession there are isome sk^tical men ; I only wonder that jonmalists believe any  A Usef f|l Wife.  We had been out to the grave-j ard to bury 3its, Pidgeon, and we were riding hontè in the carriage with the bereaTed widower. While he sopped his eves with his hand-herchief he told us about her:—  "In one resped: I never saw her equal. She was a manager. I've knowed that won^an that's lying out there in the tomb to take an old pair of my trowsei-s and make a splendid suit of cfothes for both of them out of them old pants, and a cap for Johnny, and have some left over for a rag-car oet, besides making handkerchief; out of the pockets, and a bustie for herself out of the other Hnings. Give her any old garment and it -ras as good as a gold mine. WhyV she'd take a worn out .sock and makfe a good over coat out of it, I believe. She had a turn for that kind oi f conomy.. There's one of my shirts i hat I bought in 1847 still going about making itself useful as window curtains and j^len-ty of other things. Only last July our gridiron gave out, and she tcok it apart, and in two Lours it was rigged on the side of the house as a sp'iendid lightnin > rod, all except what she had mad^ into a poKer and an ice-picK. IngCiiious ? Why she Kept our family in buttons and whittles out of the har;;i-bones she sa^'ed, an :l she made fifte(in princely chicK-en coops from her old hoop sKirts, and a pig pen out of her u.sed up corset bones. She never wasted a solitary thing. Let a cat die around our house, and the first thing you Knew J/aiy Jane'd have a mufi' and a set of furs, and I'd begin to find mince pies on the dinner table.— She'd stuff a feather bed with t'lie feathers that she'd got of!" jne little bit of a rooster, and she'd even utilize the roaches in the Kitchen so's they'd run the ch .irn—had a machine she invented îor the purpoi^e. I've seen her cooi. potato parings so's you'd thiiiK tl.cy were caiivas-bacK ducK, and she had a way of doctoringup sha^■i¡ gs that the pig'd eat em and grow i\-ton"em. I believe that woman ci uld build a four-stor\' liotel if you'd gi\e her a single pine board; or a steamboat out of a wash biler; and the very last thing she said to iue to biirv her in the garden so's she'd be useful down below there^ lelping to shove up the cabbages, l.'ll never see her liice again."  IIoAV to Kill a Towii.  If' a .-tranger comes to tcnvn. and i,s looking about for a honii^ and a business location, si eer at the idea of his locating "'•here." Tell him our business is all overc one; ou:; schools are a failure; our churches driii't amoiuit to anything; there is no society; taxes are em rmous: real estate is going down; and in short the placéis a dead failure. Tiius ycu prevent a man from coming in to help make business, t o help pay taxes and support local inititutious.  If you have a vac ant lot, hold it for a Chicago or New Y'ork price, and let it lie, overg-own with fennel.  Il you have mo.'iey to ^^lay fcr goods, send away to the city to buy* but always tell the local dealt^r to "charge it."  Regale his ears ^ rith the grand things you can do it his line elsewhere, and tell the f iistomer.-i at his counter wondei^ul t les of this character: common pol;-enes> reónirc^ this.  Oppose. <,.111 gen ¡ral principles, whatever takes the orm of public improvement. If a school hou.-e is talked of, oppose it Such things cost money, and of ( Durse the money put into them € .'aporates. and doe^• nobodv anv go^d.  So with any othei proposed improvement.—^l<'Vl^ ' 'larL.  ------ I» ---------------  Lexington Ya. '.itter in liich-mond Dispatch: "I vent, of course, to the tomb cf Lee. a id was irtatined  -tm  to lind that fre.sh iL-wers are regularly brought to adorn the graves of the Goner: 1, Mrs. Lee and yLiss Agnes—that a student's guard of honor ¿til] Keeps watch and ward at the tomb—that Gy aerai Lee's office is still preserved ; ist as be left it on the day of his fafid sicKness, and that mementoes of tìie great chieftain are cherished '.vith increasing afi'ection as the years go on. The mausoleum which is to contain Y^il-entine's beautiful re< imbfent figupi is soon to be commc.aced. and wLU be pmshed to an eai^y completion. The "JacKSon Memcr .ai Association" has been maidng bu! httie progress of late, but it is hopi I that the day is not fai" distant whe;;- a suitable mou -ument shall also mi rk the giTive of JacKson.  Many a true heiit that wouiii liave come bacK lise the dove to the arK, after the first tr i.isgression, iias been frightened be^ c nu^ recall l^r the angry Iook and Qienadng taont —the savage chari 3; of an anfor-giTing soul.  LfeAB>Ts-G THE SKY.—It is a stnsngc thin^ how little in general people know about the sky. It is the part of cbeation in which nature has done moro for tbe sake of pleasing man, mor0 for the sole and evident purpose of talking to him and teaching him, than in any other of her works, and it is just the part in which we least attend to her. There are not many of her other works iu which we I'^t atttend to her. ihere arc not manv of her other works in which some more material or essential purpose than the mere pleasing of man is not answered in every part of tljeir organization; but everv es-sentiall purpose of the sky might, as far es we know, be answered, if once in three days or thereabouts, a great, black, ugly rain cloud wa;? broken up over the blue, and every • thing well watered, and so left blu(> again until next time, with perhaps c film of morning and evening m:st for dew. But, instead of thi.'>, there is not a moment of anv dav of our lives when nature does not produce scene after scene, picture after pic^ ture, glory after glory, working still upon such exquisite and constant principles of the most perfect beauty, that it is cpite certain it is all done for UB, intended for our perpetual pleasure by the Great Being who made all, all worlds.—^¡/■'/vs//.  Elijah Hitchcock was a Conneca-cnt constable, whose character l>j-ing under scrutiny. Deacon Sol j-mon Rising was inquired of about him.  "Deacon Rising," said the questioner, "do you think Mr. Hitc'.i-cock is a dishonest man ?"'  Very promptly.) "Ob, no. sir: not bv anv means."  V »y  "\yell, do you think ho is a ineau man ?"  "Well, with regard to that." said the Peacon, a little more deliber-atelv "I mav sav that I don't real-  V - i, U  ly thuik he's a mean man; I've sometimes thought that he was what you might call a keerful man a prudent man, so to si^eak,"  "What tlo you mean l.)y aprudeut man  'YVell, I mean this; that oiie liuie he had an excution for aii';iin'-t  o  the old widow Witter, back jiere, and he went up to her hou.se and levied ir on a ilock of duck.^: and he  tin  iie.  chased them ducks one at ;i round and round the house, pooiv much all day, and e\er}- tinni h-caught a duck he'd set right duvn and wring its neck, and chari/e uiibj-  Recorder Hackeit, of í jéw on Friday sentence Geaitge Robinson from stealing law books, or attempting to steal them, from exr Govemor Tilden. He is: reported as using the following language: "George liobinson, you have pleaded guilty to grand larceny. Yoa were caught iu the act of stealing law books from the office of Mr. Samuel J. Tilden. Now, it was despicably mean for you to steal from the gentleman from whom the presidency of the United Stat^ has recently been stolen. I sentence you to two years and six montl^ in the State prison."  The Louisville Courier-Journal says: "One of the first duties of the  good citizen, is to aid as f^ as he can in supporting his county paper, for that paper can do more to promote the moral, intellectual and material interests of his coutity than any or all other agencies. Show us a county which liberally supports a good newspaper, and we wül show you a county whose petbpie are intelligent, enterprising and prosperous. A good newspaper fiourishes only where the people of the coimty are known abroad for their ■ intelligence, their pro.sperity in all pursuits of life. About the best connty to move from is one which does not support or supports but indifferently its newspaper. About the best county to move into is one which doest support, and supports libei-al-ly its newspaper.  Oddities among the, books. A short man reading Longfellow; a burglar picking at Locke; a jeweler dcvouiing Goldsmith; an artillerv-man wiih Shelly; an omnibus driver L-alliiig for one IMoore; a nice young man going to the Dickens; a laborer at his Lever;' a young woman with her Lover; Tom studying Dick's Works; a lanccr learning Shakespeare; a servant looking for the Butler; a miller deep in Mill; a glazier's hour with Paine; q^liodger ai)Sorbed in Hawthore; a Dutchman interested in Holland; a domestic man with Holmes; a bookseller t]'}-ing to save his Bacon; a woman in Thiers; a lazy man's Dumas; a determined irian, Kant; a corn-doctor v.'itli Bnuyan's I^rogress; a phiiogist i''. iiteuq:lating '^^'ordsworth; a minstrel reading Emerson; a Catho-lit :it l*(.)pe; a creditor pleased with :Si,(,-; a joli}' fellow laughing over  SiiriM,.  A woman frequently resists the love she feels, but cannot resist the love she inspires.—Jladame tW.  Railroad men may not alwavN he good dancers, but they are very akillfol on a brake-down.—Kr.  ihiiiitiptl.  No woman, even the most iutel-lectaal, beheves herself to Ihj decit.1-ly homely.—Stahh  A wag suggests that a suitable opening for many choii-s should he, *'Lord, have mercy on us, misei^ablc smgers."  An Iowa etlitor recently announced that a certain patron of his w "thieving as usual,' He dcchircd he wrote it "thrivin  HON. W. K. DAVLER, Mayor.  J. Lor«» Clerk and Treaanrcr, Joalt!$rAll^ MumlMt.  AL»»ERlíEX  'r iKTS»«»*«»»,  A T fkykir, 11. B. Ainswortte.  .V«yor'!« Court, S«Vl,>ri,a.m.CitT HalMaU? K<>icul«r iBfetiiis of tovm-tl ctcrr Jf<MMlajr cveaiBg.  SrAKlUXi; JOMMITTEeS.  ti^ce -A P Wright, I h»irma», il B Ata»« woi ih athl J i «mei«.  C^iMee» J CSfc-aeU, Ctiia n. A P Wrigàt .*iMl M B Aiwworth. ^  ^^^^-^frw^tVhmu, H B .lla^irtfftè Äud E o TWDMU.  Oemviwim -^ n Ainsworth, Ch«»». Ktl rboait>«(Mi and Jo« Jerfrr.  Clim n, L A Ml4  Printini.-L A Drtvcr, Chm n.S-l C«««!». J«» Jerger.  VI riHH»i»iN>a. Chin o, A f* n nfM and I. A I»rt*vf r.  . ^ l>r»ytr. CLm B. S J Cmml* and S  UTboœpsuu.  R^ifgtotlt.  t rsnr.-si. — lîrx^* ! t. t.  t hrij-ti.-iu. Pastor.  îî-tpii-t t hur.-h-Müi-.ii ivetíür. — Kcv. W r.. ISctiücU,  Pn^hyt«!*,, tls,;îvii...... U.k-.ni li.  r. Kcrr, P.-iotur.  E|.L>coj>al ihî.îrîî-Kvauo-«..» \\fuia«« ^ot atii»}ihtN!.  ig.  A Washington woman has ip- j pealed to be appointed a constal'lo. : despairing of catching a man in :uiy other way.—l>anl>vr<i X-^rs. ,  "Her mouth," say.^ a newspaper I man, speaking of a lady who has j had all her teeth pulled, closed | for repairs. " i  A little child t>four ae,|uaiuianef ì thinks that "(iod mu--t bi- glad \vi:vn I prayer-meeting night i-aia^.,-  he hears lots of news//'■ ' ■ /; • h'r. ' f  - r ! iloM A-> Í 01>*.l.. 1 M-  r" H. RK>îlNaTt>N. r !.. S. .M.l4-.Swaiii. ÎHwnttjit Nil-.. .in.Í (i!i lu^-iu-. XU.x'inif  S.ui...or»«r l»îvV»'l .-»Uli MîîcIkt »uvcl-.  1'. N.\i BU! TH.  S'.. h'O' I. \ ,  M, . -^g., . ) .,5 ..  lian.  M i» iac  foimtfcatiait  Kl- - S i!!it% .1, Mi'Krr. /"ts .....it-r . .  U, y. ii.-tw kill>. \ i» O- i'n BJ.:,-!;'  •'.iiim-ll St. ¡, i.ii«  I1 Adam could have bceri a once, iind had a hapi»} 110m., which to hang up hi.-^ i'hri,-.i:, stockings, he might havi; !>re n;;. better man!-^ a; ik  .A Norwich man ha.-  machine which will inru v>i4t broom handles in :i nüiiait, i be patented under ihe u:íuív>'Í couragement to Matrinninv.'  iiiî \  Literipy',  íí:;k\:;v \->S.W I ii»S .im», iiisKfii  i- ll.VN'^r.i L. Í.U- rr<--i.-irtu. Ì . ÌU I.KAN. S.., ref.irv  M!-s s.Vl.tJi: U.^il.KV. a.iU .>n JMik»<n> >!. OjH'ti íji«!¡a«-ri» ar.l  ^ .,Mî,.r> iroi.i > Î.. ,» m » t-- !■ m .su,i ir »tu ; tí ■ > -«'í'i^i- U<'Kvil.ir Hi.i-i.i.iv uu:,.-uugw cvcíu-ÍK  • i' i-U. .Ma,\ í>¡.:t V i s N(. . I.i H  - i' ;Í \N--1 ...i, !•;, ..,,U-t,¡ A. r. U.'t.KAN N-h !v!,u ■ ä r. !"//.N » . !• \ S;N K! S, 4t..  ' ^ i r;>i ly . . . H;:..^ ,,í 1,1;.: ,¡ , iu::.  er..  A lirm recently sent a lot i-i : West for collection. The n^t t-.iut^ back with the nijte.i j-am-i  each name, ont: being ■ Dead. ' Three months after the yam-..- b: I got into a new li.st and 'aum :>.ir!v with the name- marked "Still ik:,-!. '  U. ISA.VO, Î*r.■^.,|,■îll, S. V< ti'l'K!; Not, !.M ,  M. • i!« H .U , .... ....  pti WC a tip n al .  ________  ■ < • i !, >î \ i, ! ' I t : .i. I ! . !  I h i ;. i't .  - ..'H ]■ I \\ ,  ^ 1( li  age: an<.I his mileaire amounted  _ ....  mor'u the debt. Nothim.: inean  >—■  aboui it as 1 know of. but I ahvay-, thought after that, that IMr. cock was II AX-ry prudent man. '  A Lrv.. Tksteii.-AVe don't w.mt a IM^ore townshii) girl for ;i lu testei-. At a singing school uo  W o X  there the other night a young man was 1 ragging about the strength of his hmgs, and invited a girl iu tl'j company to hit him in the brea.-L-She said she was left handed, In 1 been washing that dav and was tlr-  O V  ed aiul didn't feel very active, bv.t at his great urgent recpaest shu '' : go at him. When his friends ',vei.: to piv'K him up he said he thoue'Lt he would die easier lying <lowii.-He had lost all recollection of Inr. -ing any lungs, but the y..'.in_-woiii^^n consoled him ijy admitting that she didn't hit him as hard she might have done because she ' / rather liiiod him.—TT"-''..,- I' '. }■':.. 1  iii:. C'iiij.u - L.vi.'-.ii.— 7'hcre i.i no day -50 sacred but that the laugh of a 'Jiild will make it holier still. Strike  "Speaking of riddles, Mv>. -K. said a Chicago landl-jrd, "Can tell the diiiV-rence b-aw: rn , steak and a .shingk-V" "No.' ' I'll broil you a shiiigie u-r everv morning for lau. akfa;-! m of beef-ste:di."  I'A-t.iovcinui" ('lailxji'i,.:' i''- Jai of iUissouri., Hiaj-ned [],■■ -i-it-r it is re])Orted taat w ' foi' the ia>t lu  re[)lied: ■Vc^^. C'huJ her. Vou na--- go! for goutiness «ak«- do old WijiLian."  Í ■ 1 ' H J. ;; i 1 li r r, M..I.' ÌS,,  ■ ................• : W . ■ u,  O;, .. •!, ■ ! U . .!,,. ¡ÍÍ  1 :;(.  ■•n ; i.it; - • r I  Fire De^piiHmactt.  î 1 ». : \ i - \ • - 1 - ; . u! i I ' ! .■ ■ - M......Uii. .  ! r'!'( ^ i. i : t: i , I = . \! 1'  i ' ■ : ' !. 1; 1 . f \ \ ^ .  • l l tiiK I ; •  goli ie;; h l: r.  ir:.  tliy liand of in-c. (.) wierd niusi-th'. iyre strung \\ith Apollo's  I'lll the \-ast catlK'dral j v.':'li ^N'niplionies sweet uid k/ft toiii-he/ c.f the «„»rgan keys. br.<_'l>;rJyiovv, until yoiu' silver •lo i nicli and kiss the moonlit , ;ind okarni the lov-rs ^vand'■r-the \ine-<-kul shoi-'.-s: but you.' sweetest strains are dis-•on;}.i;ir<;d with cliildliOud's iaiigli" the laugh that fills ii''-- • y-'; Willi ]:-j/n\. Oh ri})phng "f iaiighlor, thiju art tiio bless-.d uoundarv Ikif; between the beast Uid niaij. ..Uid every ^vaywai'd ^^'a.e •i ihhi-: doth 'b-owu some fretful 'lend of ^■ar';. Laughtei- should 'i.:ike 'kraikes oi -ov enough in the  A. V O  ^ . 'ii ;el:-5 0'fiht;w jrld lo cat^-h an^l ihoid a:id -iorifv ike .......  "W...1; y. lost miii-.. o actly: if y^. thre^ad nhd tho iiit.ri'ka worst -^l)0;i world  jii  ' i 1 ■■ o : ' .a i  ■Ii AV ÍíjUÍ  a-i:'  . 1 t  11 i I i i i  ,11  rnst ter  I dcay  ■ lío'.V ' -,  V • :.!;!,■ ' Xi a \ \ i  i ! >11  a .i,  i •< >1 %  . ! h a.''. 1 , sa . .V. M. .iO,. i ^  - ii.^-i. t.ay. i o'y i ,, ,..  ! a M .Í.Í....V, !'•.• ! , i  a. ít.  i i. i  ..híy  ■ti»'- r  !  a !  .\ y'..auj  of  ih  par' her  o ' • .,  --eiilk.na-  ' a  .. a  aí:a a ai a, S a ' ■ a ; ■ •.  S' í i iakoa; Ina stockii. ed, lo a oua.y .reíia  !á;jU da:" • i"*"- 'O. aa a  ii:  - \ ■ ■ ■■ ..r-.^ .r, í la.,,. i! M  o. ¡ • S'M ; , f,. jj  •a- i.- M...,,. ..... ,,, í a ■ . . ' :  ' ■ ' ■ ■ i ' • ' ' - a r . sa -a I-ii-■ • • - •• .. a- , ■■  y '' ■ ■■ a • ■ ■ ' i .1 fi  ^ ■ ' i. '  s. . 'I "I í j ' f •. ; > -li a, i / a <-, i Î »..  ■ ■ rr • :> i! , ; . . ... M ,, . ■ ,, ' i a  S M  All the generations of  mankii.  are passing over the earth swifthy j ji one wave of them after another ■ brea,^ing on the shores of eternity. ' a But it is not lixe the wild w av-;s af the sea that leave no mor^j iLan a little loam or a few v/eeds on :k: barren strand, (xenerations fa.i rathnr IIkc the leaves of the for^-i treey strewn by the autumnal wind.-;. but as they perish they leave behind them on the soil a fertihzing p fr^am which other trees gro'v t iu the ligh: of other summers, to l.'uttle With the winds ia winters.  ir- i  1..  A'  - ^--d'iy' '■p'^t '.'."Lere a i; :!..oej' rroes i'c-i le, a:, ok.l negro wfis ■all::,g out t'j ki;-. wife: 'Aian-I '.latil ciiicke:;.-^ aliUt up .ako: k^a kke 1 told yerk' y 1 1 kke ter know wkatk de : '-■ou kit vou's »0 rmgiitv  h Al*, dem chickens all at -:.a replie'l "IS'eiXir you I kny.v'vhat's de matter" an !  a ■ - M :  Í ' a.  M<  it  auaa'  and Bulwer  t:'a;r v. cep- -1  a ;  ue:a  i..-^ Loa--  Î a-ar-. d'il dc:a naggers  ■Wtvia : a a.-.  vard  j'w-rie r.ight,  I  were t'vo v jau their Uaniiv».'-  o ' / af r» o ; « I ,  o. . A ! / , »f . '#» ; I, M a j, '•!J ■ - <■ 1 ) < .¡-..hn Í ja.ïi., -  J; tl . ".s. «, a j . , . .  ■r.o , » .,:,.! / r .. .. i I... ,  - '.'a o M K a - . Ï  o «.! : J a-  » , .> , ,1..:. o.,' //î'«. M i ; M  a V- Í .. / u;«. 1 î Í :.  ■ÎJUO-. . - :..u,o M H ? ■ . ' -a  . -, ia* ;a>-i î. , H ,: t. -;v..o ¡r.,' , ■ ■■4 a.- . , il  ^ . r., U a ■  ii O r î. -•-,,<, U . .. - . ; H  W J ! f (  istar.-^  I  V A ^ .  A Philadelphia woman 1- -a horse railroad comp;;ny for damages She was throat n down i car bv a eollision, la'taking her  4, O —  ihe company intr,« luces pruof.-s that she wa.« not graspiug the -trai or she Would not havc: hurt. swears thai her coi :et wits vj t:_ri.i that sbe cotild not reach up to ti. straps.  A ^^'este-rn editor throw - up. h-, sponge with the remark.- that -at doesn't pay to nm a newspajxr aa i town where the bosineiis read ahuaiiace, pick their teeth v, ith hening tails and advertise on the cottrt hoase door.  "'I bad  e-aîiie t  chiekens "U'Lat :  a'y Tie ikm. -i '.-ke-'i U].'. v»-ar. ________arti  li -O» .îiV common !;garaîr.e »r:,-  a-e—:viib ::ì oar laDí_aage are l»r-  'al íro:n the art of eurr/'.-ntrv luav  * Í0 **  ■e -aei. i:. the ivklowing v^itente. Ti--; : rk'ai a i-ulk ■-Laved a  t-* - ■ a^-iî-. r I ■■;:> a ¡uií-Í'.  ra:-.á'i .Ii mdiatmeiit, impaniielled . ytrw put them .n a ty.'X. naikd a • :t;a;--. hammered a yidgr-, and . -.la.k: court.  a . T'j ;aa.i ..  'i lA ''t oîua:  ! • î H. j. a '  ' a r  . J Ì-  a  dU eiitrv.  l'i there asiviian:.: 'hat % my irecK.e- -a  I'l'^A''  Oh, ... , ■.., a.=. a eorkbc; eir. or .oa % iu.^t ar take n ■■a -  and ^hä-ve 'À.^ta aÁ. k/r .î '.y Waat tkem ma-ie paiot \WT iàiA: rkaek nu'l  , Î. / ; I 'i  • ' :. -i ■• a Iii e ;■ a •  "Oh, Harry 11 am going to graduate next conunenceo^iit," eaid a boarding house school girl "Graduate in iriuO?" said Harry, ^^ly, in whUe iiiiuliiL"  Madar.u-:. do yon ki.îO'.v tLa.1 you p-,^'..of the Ixist ^oiceë in the worpi-;" ...yj ii saucy fellow to a r*o-one ^iay ihi« "Indeed,  •Ì0 }-a.ü think nor repUe^i the, trith a rlüsh of pride at the coisplimeiit. "I do, most certainly," oo&tini^ nurcal, "for if yon hadn t it tronid ha re worn oat long ago. " For the tin t timc' in ber life thât womao hiKln't a ifí «ay.  « : •. i< A i.-Í k ; .«i  .. ili-- il V s  "That cAjrjM.-t. -sari •» deaiar 10 an oíd the otli«:f day. "lU'U  cüry*A IM oLe duilíJi tk:rî;.-!i ,»,- |><. r yard, bot ís^^emg it« to yo'i, y-.'Q tan have it ior one «Jotlar thirty. ' Wliiie ht wa» catting it 'jff, th« ianm-r proadly laid to hin wiíe ''•I never OKi^ him before, bat he takes me lor mum big anui. Kow tlien, Hartar, «eewbftl 'tin to hare a btt^iorxi who ìookìtwmàxiiiiil'  !' H , 4 ¿ ?ti < t.  a  a. lì  î- tifa i" u.  A . íii-.'^»;. - í' i ^ ...■..■ A lai » r  a;%íí.a -, «li^s. . f»  t.. í -.ff.t-f, .J. I' . K.. ? >1 /-i/;«-?. »...«..4*» a.í KS = iLhM'iJi i'A'i 'lai;!;«!»  líECt-'ÍT. .  jj i a/. íl. H«te:»«}|. I«.}**, ••  < .a. ií t.. 'MtifMtîÎ, •^AißMt^fi.  Mareé êml 9*§m  irtítWr.  ".^/-l U'j'tz^ltJt } J» Aí'tíi  ixt iái'»!»! im Uny A XwtcvkWr* ijttwmif» — lf<M*l«jf« im li«jr «Mi  (..«i^iti»—Wr4|s««»it«y 4fier «ii» Umáé^f b|  if.«rd» «»<1 '«tf|i4«iialwr. iuütietmmr»  '"'.I- t .. «tv   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication