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Thomasville Times Enterprise Newspaper Archive: November 3, 1960 - Page 1

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   Thomasville Times Enterprise (Newspaper) - November 3, 1960, Thomasville, Georgia                                 f  1  i  •fair, Mild  Continued fair weather today and Friday with a high Friday of 73.  (See Complete Details, Tides on Page 7).  VOL. LXXI-NO 219  ®í)omaáUílle ®:íme¿-Snterprí0e  TEL CA 6-2400-P. 0. BOX 111  THOMASVILLE. GEORGIA, THURSDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 3, 1960  daily except  sunday  5c PER COpÄ  NEWS BRIEFS  4,000 Are Killed As 2fid Cyclone Hits Pakistan  C'HITTAGONG. PakisUn ^ -Four thousand more persons reportedly were kuled Monday by a (vi lone and tidal wave in the area of the Bay ot Kjneal coast,  l! was Kast Pakistan's senond SI.'h - aiastrophe within a month. A cxlone and tidal wave on Oct. ]"> killed an estimated 6,000 per sons on i.slands off the coast.  Tne fir.st semiofficial asse.ss-ni'^nt of Monday's storm damape was announced today. Deaths and damage have not yet been report-  Explorer Satellite Blasted Into Orbit  Test Seeks Better Understanding Of Mysterious Ionospheric Layers  r.\PE C.-^NAVERAL, Fla. (AP)—A 90-pound "spinning top" .«satellite whirled into orbit today to begin the most exten.-sive study ever attempted of the earth'.s ionosphere.  officially deslg-' llinillllllllllllll||||||||||||||||||||||||||M  Child Drowns After Falling Into Wash Unit  The satellite, officially designated Explorer 'VIII, is designed to give scientists a better understanding of the mysterious electrically charged Ionospheric layers which reflect radio signais back to earth.  The experiment could lead to improved communications between contlnenl,s, ships and  Belgian Congo Activities Blasted By Hammarskjold  QUITMAN — A three-year-old Negro boy, George Henry Sutton. Jr., was drowned yes-  - ^ fr-irs^iî""  Uie previous storm.  ^ ^ ^  Bar Exam Deadline  ATLANTA tfl — The deadline for filing appUcaiions to take the 1061 Georgia Bar ExamfaiatioB is  .Nov. 2.5.  F. N. Byrd, rhalrman of the Stale Board of Bar Examiner« said today that will be the last (lay for filing application« to take the examinations which will b«  held on Feb. t2, 23 and »4. ^ ^ ^  10,000 Evacuated  ROVU^.O, Italy OP — Ten tho«-s.-'nd i csidents of the Po delta lowlands were evacuated today as a flood tide raged through a 4flO-foot break in the big rlver'B dikes and poiiied over thouaanda of acre« of  f n rm 1Qnri  Firemen and troops rusbod from novigo. Mantua, Padua and Ferrai a in an attempt to throw «p an emergency dike.  Ù ^ ^  Listen, Detroit!  •MOSCOW I* — A ttimight lor  l>etroit:  Fonr postage stamps f«at«riiig  Soviet motor vehicles baTe be«a ir^sued: (1) ^^ kopecks depicMng a 40 ton dump truck at a oon-strurUon project; (2) 40 kopecks showing the Volga IfanowiBe with the Kremlin In th« background; (.3) 90 kopecks—Mo«k-vich 407 on the Black Sea Shore, and (4) 1 ruble—tourist bus on  a highway.  ^ ^ ^  Theft Investigated  VALDOSTA, Ga. liFI — An lo-ve.sligation has been Initiated Into the theft of 2,000 lunch tickets and .3,33 boxes of school pictures from Valdosla High School.  The estimated loss to the s( hool's lunch program over a three-year period haas been estimated at 12,000. "Rie ptctures are valued at $500.  Five stnoenta havs been implicated in the ttiefts.  The matter was referred to Solicitor General Robert Humphreys Wednesday. The action followed an investigation by 'Valdoeta police and the school board Into reports that the tickeU were being stolen and sold at reduced prices to other students.  ^ ^ -{(  Three At Large  TALLAHASSEE, FUl. UD — Only three of the eight con>1cts who broke out of the Live Oak road camp prison remained at large today.  Two more were picked up by the road camp warden, Lynwood Watt, Wednesday in a wooded area near the Suwannee River where they had hidden since their escape Monday.  Raymon Benlts and Garrett d'.Ault were found and arrested without resisUnce by Watts and a guard crew. Three fugitives had been picked up earlier in Georgia and Florida.  Still at large were Dewey Size-more, Alex Connell and Harry Walker.  ^ lîr tS-King Can't Vote  MOr-TTGOMERY, Ala. UPi — The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. can't vote here Nov. 8 because of unpaid poll taxes, county officials have ruled.  The probate Judge's office said Ring, who has moved to Atlanta, is biel'gible for absentee voting bccaise he has paid no poll taxes since 19M and the deadline for pasrment was last Febnuiry.  The Negro intention leader had said Tuesday he planned to vote absoitee st Montgomerjr be-  February was too recent to quall-  «_ Um tn M^ in fmt^mlm  communications satellites like the recently launched Echo and Courier and with future manned space craft.  • • •  AN OFFICLAL of National Aeronautics and Space Admlnlstratiop reported the successful orbiting of Explorer vm gives the United i States a commanding edge over j the Soviet Union in exploration of' the ionosphere.  Robert Bourdeau, head of the ionosphere branch of NASA's God-dard Space FUght Center, said published reports indicate the Soviet Union has been probing the ionosphere with rockets and until today was considered even with this country in data gathered from this sea of electrical particles which extends from 50 miles to about 1,000 miles above the earth'i surface.  A powerful 76-foot Juno II rocket blasted off from this missile test center at 12:23 a.m. today. Its lour sUtges fired with clocklike precision and boosted the pay-load to necessary orbital speed of n»o»e tban 18,000 miles an hour.  Two hours after launch, NASA announced the "spinning top" was in orbit. It is so nicknamed because tt is shaped Hki a child's top and qiins during Iltgfat ior sUbilizaUoo. It is 30 InchM In height and diameter.  "Hie satellite spun Into a patb with an apogee — farthest point from the earth—l,tfo miles and perigee — closest point — of 216 miles, is fairly close to the Intended orbit o< 300 to 1,000 miles. Bach pass arowod tbe world takes 113 minutes.  Oiflciak reported ttie pftyloMt's transmitter was working  head-first into an open washing machine at his home in the Troupville community.  The mother had taken out one machine of clothes, put another in, and left the machine running while she went to the clothes line.  She said she found the boy's body in the running machine.  Brooks County hospital authorities pronounced the child dead from drowning.  The Suttons are tennant farmers.  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiniiii  Hampering UN Efforts Charged  UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. (AP)—SecretiU'\-General Dap Hammar.skjold charged today that hirpo-u-ale Belirian activities in the Congo are hampering U. N. effort.s to restore law and order.  'growing hostile altitude on the  I part of the Mobutu govr.iinun  toward the U.N. Command. Man>  of the young commissioners ir  .hat government, he said, were  constantly accompanied by Bel  lian advisers to whom they liS' Istratlon set up by Col. Joseph (gj^^j  One of the re.sulta. he added  In a voluminous report the Oen-I eral Assembly, Hammarskjold j said large numbers of Belgian nationals were returning to the Con-j go and were exerting strong influence on the temporary admin-  Mobutu. He blamed th»  Belalans for a  In Chemistry, Physics  2 Nobel Prizes Given Americans  STOCKHOLM (AP)—Two American scientists—Dr. Willard F. Libby and Dr. Donald A. Glaaer — today were awarded the 1960 Nobel prizes in chemistry and physics.  Ubbv Si f«mn»r tnpmb^r of  ttie 'D.8. Atomic Energy Commission, was awarded tbe chenUstry prise for devising the "atomic time clock," a mettiod of determining tbe age of fossils, wood and other organic matter by active carbon present. Tbe proactive earboD present, he process can determine within 900 years the age of samples as old as 35,000 years.  Olaser, 94 and a member of the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley, was named tbe i^yslcs laureate for invention  ^f <*>\tiKhia KotVt fr\r  Heads for Sout-k  Nixon Sees Ike's Aid As Clincher On Victory  NEW YORK (AP)—Vice President Richard M. Nixon headed for the Soiith today, jubilantly predicting that President Eisenhower's campaigning for him here Wednesday put the clincher on a Renublican victory.  ^T i w A •« a An V« Awr A«*  wild Airport within a few minutes of each other this morning, Nixon to continue his campaigning and Eisenhower to return to Washington.  Before his. departure. Nixon said that if the tide continues", "I will w in by one of the biggest electoral rote victories ever."  Nixon accused his Democratic opponent. Sen. John F. Kennedy, of "whLstling in the dark" and "obviously getting panicky" in claiming the Democrats have the edge.  The vice president expressed confidence he will Carry New York with its vital 45 electoral votes.  Elsenhower made no statement on his departure.  Climaxing a day of vigorous plugging for the Nixon-Lodge ticket, Eisenhower Wednesday night touched off tumultuous acclaim in championing the GOP candidates and in hitting at Sen. John F. Kennedy at a party rally In Manhattan's Coliseum, i So tremendous was the acclaim, so many times was Eisenhower 'nterrpted by the wildly cheering crowd that Nixon got to speak j only a couple of minutes before the rally proceedings—carried nationwide on television—went off the air.  • • •  ; THE VICE PDESroENT slmlUng-ly told his coast-to-coast audience: "I can only say that'I am always glad to give up my time for the president of the United Stetes, DwigW D. lasenhower."  Nbum' called his day In New York tbe brightest of tbe Republican campaign.  "It bas started us to a gre»t victory in New York and victory in the natiOD. Now let's go," be said.  imderscored tbe importance he attacBi»" W  w—1. xa____- -  t  drive to defeat Kennedy. The NlX' on forces are hoping the help will have nationwide impact. But they are especially hopeful the Presl-  rii>nt'« rToitt nnnii1»Htv «illl «Hn  photographing atomic particles Superheated liquid in the chambei slows down the blgfa-speed pat tides until they appear ia phot»  gn^rtis as a string of bubbles • • •  THEY were the 7»rd and 74tt Americans to win Nobel awards since the annual prises were first given in 1903. Each will receive ■ check for »43 ,«37 from the trust fund left by Alfred Noble, the Inventor of dynamite.  Other Nobel award winners thij year are Saint^John Perse, French poet and former diplomat, for lit-arature; and Sir Frank MacFar lane Burnet of Australia and Dr Peter Brian Medawar of BrlUli for medicine.  The committee announced without explanatim last week that the other award—the peace prize — would not be given this year. II is the nth time this prize hai  Chest Pledges Hit $33,000 Mark  Community Chest cash and pledges today jumped past th( $33 thousand mark as $1,200 were added to the total, chairman James A. Anderson announced. —.- K-»-----------The total now stands at $3?,-  >fm> ttm ttrlrBr ff<« r</<h0Bf nf all nnA jo «1 cnn  plums—New  Vrki-W* ÄK  ed to make the halfway  nt tha «AO nnn anai  MA a ,.lr  MARE LIFTED FROM WELU-Tlus n \Mf. a phito more, o$ sh« wos being rescoed from o 12.foot well on o ranch neor Hoyword, Cofiff. Lody wos pop-eyed ond sitting on ker kounches when discover^ 1n tlie welt. It required on injec--iwr-^'trenqaHuei^^ keoif^fiy^ '¿rdnc'dmi tlTng to ffFf  l<ul« fcvMi k«r MtMMMia* fAP Wimnhn»«)  was that "the chaoilc lulnilnistrn tive and economic situatlor i reached the verge of colIap.se'' be fore the U N. Command stepped in firmly and took • more active hand.  "It may be concluded that « gradual but purposeful return 1.' being sUged by Belgian nation als, which has assumed serioui significance in view of the ke;. areas which they have penetratet in the public life of the countrj and the possible effect of theli activities on all aspects of the UNC's (the U.N. Command) re sponslbiliUes," the secreUry-gen eral told the assembly.  "All too often these develop ments have coincided with anti U.N. policies or feelings at thi various points of Impact."  The acUvities of the retumlni Belgians, Hammarskjold said, ap pear to be "clearly at varianct with" assembly directives ant with the U.N. Command's basic objectives.  The secretary-general made pub lie communications in which h« had protested against the scUvl ties of Belgian nationals In Uu Congo, which was a Belgian ter rltory until last July.  Hammarskjold said that some BelgUn nationals "are believed tc have been actively arming sep-sratist Congolese forces and, Ir some cases, Belgian officers have directed and led such forces which, in certain areas, have been responsible for brutal and oppres-  Jack Predicts Demo Victory  In ArizoiM  EN ROUTE WITH KENNEDY iAP)—Sen John F. Kennedy said today Arizona and the nation "arc going Democratic next week."  Kennedy told a morning etreel rally In Phoenix that Arizona's Sen. Barry Goldwater had wired Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York that Arizona was "In the hag" for the Republicans.  "Judging from the people who turned out here," said Kennedy, "It's a mighty thin bag."  Arizona's largest political turnout of the year greeted Kennedy. There were an estimated 5,000 to 10,000 at the airport, 2,000 at a breakfast and 5,000 at an outdoor •peech.  He added thaat Ooldwater's presidential nomination prospects Ir 1964 may be Improved "because we're going to retire Mr. Nlxor to beauOful California."  Kennedy struck at the Repub llcan record on conservation and said, "Do you believe the Repub llcan party, committed to no ne* starts-how can they build Art sona?"  HE SAID dams all over United States are memorials to Franklin D. Roosevelt, but' the memorla] of this administration was con-talned in three words—"No New starts."  Leaving Phoenix Kennedy flew eastward with stops at Albuquerque, N.M.; in Texas and Oklahoma City.  At one point a jet plane swept overhead making It difficult to be beard at the Phoenix rally, and Kennedy looked up and cracked: "AH the people are down here, Dick."  He said the admlnte^atlon^hsd iSSti In the areas oi"outef' s^ce  CAMPAIGN GHTING HOTTERP-Flomei engulf a police officer's motorcydL _______  motorcade beoring Sen. John F. Kennedy posse d through downtown Let AagelM» Fopir fh ere thrown at the Democrotic presidentiol nominee fell on the bike's hot exhont p^ m it afire. Officer ot right tries to put fire out with an extfaiouislier. (AP Wirapllot»)  11-Year-Old Second in Fair Evenfr  Youfh Tops At Hog Shoié  By SAM OLARKE  An outstanding FFA member anc an 11-year-old ThomasvUle lad walked sway with top honors li Annual Fat Barrow ^w yester day at the "Deep South" Fair Charles Graham, 17, was award ed the Blue Ribbon after his ho( was Judged the Grand Cbampioi in the show.  Littte John Vlokers, ll-year-old student at Central High, won sec-end plaee as Us porker wae selected tbe Reeerre Obampkm.  • • •  FAIR ASSOaATION President Ed Langford announced another record was set when some 2,18t persons attended the Fair. He said this was conslderaly larger than the attendance for the same day last year.  "I hardly know what to say," John related, "you see, this Is the first time I ever entered livestock In a show."  His proud father, J. E. Vlckern of ThomasvUle, said the youngster raised the animal all by hlmseil during the past year.  Young Vlokers also took other honors as he was first place winner in the 4-H aub Individual cnass, sjid his pen of three piga came out second In the show.  Becave of bli ontetandlng activiUes bi the FFA, Graham was selected by the ThomasvUle Retary CInb a« winneo' of a free trip t« the group'« national con-venUon held this summer at Kansas City.  • • •  HE 18 the son of Mr. and Mrs. L B. Graham of Merrillvllle and , senior at Central High. The youthful Future Farmer li president of the Central High FFf Chapter, and has participated it  ----1 -.. - OD-rloiiltiiral nrntiif»t«  nMM III fML  RESERVE GHABIPION award b this class went to Jerry Hurst, 17 Central High student from Ochloch nee.  Thia waa tKA flf>af ilmA VTlir*  IllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllilllllllllllUI  Cupid's Arrow Pierces Hearts Of Fair Couple  Dan Cupid Invaded the  "Deep South" Fair grounds yesterday and shot his arrow Into the hearts of a carnival I couple.  John A. Wood of Oantt, Ala., and Miss Anna Jean Myers of New Albany, Indiana, were married In ThomasvUle.  "We have been trying to do this for several months but we haven't stopped long cnongh to tie the knot," Wood declared.  Wood Is employed as a weight guesser, and the ceremony was performed here by the Rev. McCoy Johnson, pastor, First Methodist Church.  iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIII  M  had entered a elaer in anjr dioir,^  Brown exhibited a Black Aague« while Hurst's wlnniaf animal wae^ a Shorthorn. r-  Clifford Lee, aMlstaat eountjrl a«ent oi Dooljr County and stock authority, served M judge^ (hirinf tbe Fat Fairow Show.  He Is a former member of miS-University of Oeorfin Lhreeloelt« Judging Team.  BoOi the Fair preeMtttt Ua^'^' ford and Uveetoek OwmwWe» ? 0»«liatnnaa Harry mnatrn eri»^ some ef the ttamt ewlae pre* ^ dnoed in Sonthweat Geergl» W<N ^  displayed In Uie show*. • • •  THE FAIR president tojeeted t '  new policy In the proceeding bf' paying off the prlie money fei eilr., ver doUars.  Officials announced that today-^ has been declared School Day for Negro children, and aU wav be admitted Into the Fair groondi, free of charge.  All rides have be«i reduced fof the youngsters sfld an ideal day,^ weatherwlse, Is predicted.  This is the ard Annual-'--^  South" Fair which Is sponsored the ThomasvUle Exchange Ciub^ E. T. Smith Is president of theiv  TTvrhnn^A iTIub.  ^OPc Dprnond Cancellation  Democratic TV Film Rmnded Truel Hoax  «r  urxw., (AP)—Republicans have branded a^ arious agricultural projects. Democratic television film "a cruel hoax" and demanded^ Graham also won first place In! that future scheduled showing.s be canceled. ,  .... ............Democratic reply: "The | pre.sldential nominee, knew tWí»  . „K 'nrlor to the interview and r- '*' reason the Republicans are o -1 _ —^  (.,.tln<r an Intensely  : that iiuw.  Morton quoted Kennedy as  Dem'"""'^'" that  annaul Fat Barrow Show.  The Grand Champion award foi pen of three went to Gary Jack- jeciuiB son while a pdrkers exhibited by mmmerclal li  Jeff Willis were declared Re serve Champs in this competlUon Another Importsat livestock event was tbe price steer contest In which Lamar Brown, 18,  water Into fresh.  "We have to recognize we are face to face with a dangerous ad versary," he said, "and unless we move forward what happens to Af rlca, what happens to the United States, What happens to Arizona? That Is the great issue of our time. I ask your help In picking this country up and moving It Intc the sixties."  At San Francisco Wednesday night, Kennedy amplifl?d on his pro|»s^ :'i)f8ce corp?" yomg men encouraged to join the  ucuiar tuiiiiiicii..». - —v,»« ' dramatizes the need for a decen medical care for the aged bill.'  Republican National Chairmai Thruston B. Morton said Wednes day night the five-minute film oi medical care for the aged, pre sentlng an interview by Sen. Johi P. Kennedy with Mr. and Mrs John McNamara of Newport, Ky. • has been exposed as a dellberaU deception."  Morton made pubUc an affldavi from Dr. L. Howard Schrlver oi the Ohio Blue Shield medical 'n surance plan. It attested ttJat m suranfce covered all but $148.26 o McNamara's Wli-W total hospita and medical expense M an oper aUon resulting from a fall froB a ladder.  1» schrlver  ki... tha iVmUMttatil  ing in tne lum uu» »it»«-I "Incurred a debt ot ovei |6(>n pay his medical bills" and "whatever savings they (t*"» Ñamaras) may ha,ve 'biti* have to be spent to DaX biUs."  Morton sent -craUc NaUr"-' M. Jac''""" tlon of owuww "th'" •The  and  elderiy With » Utlor- ^ said.'-lAtftoik  ____Ára^   

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