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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: June 28, 1910 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - June 28, 1910, Atlanta, Georgia                               C Freeman ami A. C. Frtteman, Jr., of Arcadia, ST.. Owner ol Car, iftdvL; Monticello, MRS. X a FREEMAN, of cadla. Fla- il- A.'C. FREEMAN. JR, Fla. Vatailr L. L. Camp, MontlcellO. Fla-. Internally Injured. Dr.. J. L. Rbble.. internally; arm broken. ,fr 5" A. C. Freeman. Arcadia, Injured about head. June An extra freight train  while tn'e 'ahadowto. of death closed 'arouhdTh'lm and, volley after volley from rifles of t'w.o state. m'llltla companies jnade a .sieve -his. hum- .ble home, H.. the white desperado .who, hlsrlasi Babi ijath. day by-.the Instantaneous "murder two officers-of' the :law-'and the :i eertout of'three others, paid penalty of death shortly, I .o'clock" tiiis 'morning. He succuB! to, many .wounds" received from the 1 volley fired Into the'building, early In the night by. a mob of .infuriated citi- zens or 'rom those of the military I companies which began their .attack I after f o'clock Almost at. the same.jhom.ent. Sheriff. J.: P. Mc- county, who was wounded yesterdny'whtle making a desperate remove a wound officer from the range ol I Bostwick's deadly llre.'eiiilred. Jamei another off Kir. was added; to the list- oi> wounded ...during' the early I merging fusillade, but It is believed" 4 that he will recover'. I Dwtwlek to the iMmt -Ditch. I Surrounded by his six "little; children i whom" he held prisoners almost" to tBe I end of the, siege, Bostwlck. who ht "j declared the, Intention of dying rathi I than submit to arrest on the charge Tof attempting murder his brother In-Ia'w because ,ot a ;dispute .growing out ot the settlement' of his wife's es late. BosiwJck- fought thfe battle-t the last' ditch, and not once "did i uord or sign of surrender pass his lip or appear In tlic expressldh' of his d< tennlned features.' .Knowing was near, tbe desperate man- nnally ar ._. Jlxlng-a tax of n Per-head n, all dogs of the state re1- ealed, that in very shirt order. The conBjrtttee 'met Monday aftttr- joon'aiid thWprincipal topic'of dtsfeus- lon'was the There werejaVe dealing with this subject wfelch id in'the house, wtiloK' haa'been referred'to mfftae 'for lonsideratton. Each MIL-in oiiie way pTOvlffed for the (r'- hat law.. considerable dlscussloh' 'the" oiiimlttee decided to enta'tlye ,'j. 'couirtTr, one dog without payment of tax. was tabled along with. the. others, with the exception cl.the bill by TBe committee will submit Its. re- port to the house Tuesday, and Mr. Adams- will endeavor to It up .for passage some time'this week. The'act taxing .dogs was- passed, by the legislature at tbe last.seisjon, and  ntloned [n general' ship are H-jn. Hewlett Hall, of New- nan. chairman'-of'the state executive committee; Judge John J. Allen, ledgevllle, Judge of county court of Baldwin-. county7 and Judge Roger L. Oanrble, of LoulsvlUe. former judge of 'the' superior crturt' All of them are well-known lawyers 'who' have been Weannga Broad Smile Sena- tor La Foliette Departs from Sagamore Hill Oyster Bay.. N. T., June M. La Foliette. United States senator from Wisconsin, and the father of publican spent two hours ;hls afternoOh talking politics wltn- Theodore Roosevelt; He left Oyste Bay wearing a broad smile. Senator Elmer Burkett. of Jsebraek-t. anofcher-out-and-out inaurgent, is com ng to Sagamore Hill after Colonel Roosevelt returns from Boston. He too, will talk politics. Representative Madison, of Kansas Irreconclllable Insurgent and ardent defender of Gilford as a mem- ber, of the Ballinger-PInchot congres- sional investigating committee, will be Sagamore Hill probably late this week. will be politics. Senator'La Foliette arrived early in the afternoon. He had with "him B. Hoe, a- New York lawyer, who was formerly-.his law -partner. Colonel Roosevelt's chauffeur -was .waiting for tbein.'and whisked them away to Sag- a more-Hill.. The senator had pulled his hat down. eyes, and tried to escape unseen. But he was caught fairly at It by a group, of newspaper saw the Roosevelt autemo- blje. They tackled him on suspicion, although nobody recognized him, for his hat hid his" famous pompadour: "Not a said. "I'm going to Sagamore Hill, but I don't-want a word said All; Ria-fcV m Follette. When he returned just. In time to catch a train for New York, he looked like" a schoolboy who had Just won a medal. He was smiling his most ex- pansive persuasive smile. "It's all right, .he cried Jovially. The colonel says I may talk to you." The train pulled out and so the group of Interviewers hopped on, with the senator, and .rode .on. to the next -station. -Did he replied to the.Urst question. Columbus, Ga.. June Local aucolsts, and there are-many of. them here, say Columbua must Oft the map of the roimd-the-state tour to be held next fall. They argue that ft will not be a run Georgia un- less U conies here, touch west- ern border, going from here by Cus- seta, Preston and Dawson direct to Albany; thence by Thomaivtlle or Valdosta, down practically to Florida line; thence to the seacoast at Brunswick or Savannah, then up to Au- gusta on the extreme eastern side and. from the foothills of Blue Ridge to Atlanta. "That Is th'e route for a tour around said a leading business man here today. "I have-been talking to a number of our-auto-owners' and they: are very much Interested. Columbus will put In more cars than Macon. so far as I can judge from what I see In the papers. The motorlata on the Macon route do not appear to appreci- ate' the significance and the possibili- ties of the tour. We. realize that It means -establishing a route for motor tourists and, having, toured through New England. I "know what a well aa- verttsed, touring .road t means to Jhe towns "traversed. England and. wa went, the hotels ana Inns -wers thronged. met hun- the .toads farm serving lunches and keeping; travelers over nlghi and.many a farmer kept gasoline'for sale. The blacksmith shops were doing a good garage and repair business. lir New Hampshire and Vermont the abandoned farms are In demand for summer homes by city folks. Lands which the owners could hardly give away a few years ago, are now selling like suburban lots. "The fact Is, everything Is suburban to th'e man with a car. "Columbus wants that tour to here. We -will put In a number of cars and we will give toward the prizes. Columbus has public right, when something worth wtille shows up. Some of our people are In correspondence with Atlanta and Sa- vannah about the route, and we are going to swing that run this way If it is possible. "Southwest Georgia Is our territory. Columbus does a very large business with that part of the state and we want to keep In close touch with It If we get a good road from here f to Albany, hundreds of the b- men down there will run up their autos, instead of Jumping train and going to or There are twenty counties belowd which are nearer to Columbus thai Macon, and every one of those cot ties Is developing rapidly. A goi highway from here to Albany wli. Weather and he bis own or nnotnor-s behalf makng" candidate. eadqaarttrs In was that th? mor. goyornor liW 'the CKtnPtttkn are confident .that-Judge; in the race will "not' be taken-ftjim vhe Snjjgl side.' Governor. 'Smith haaflot decided nipon the speccl st as'sb'on.as.Jie ca.n arrange the af fairs, of hla offJceT -As soon it became-known that a vacancy, In: the attorney .general's office was very probable. :the friends ,of Judge ..Gamble .In the legislature 'intention :e.circull _ _ __... .__ '.efdcuon to the JudgesBlp he was solicitor of Almoat -concurrentlycume-ibe.'riport that frJSfidS of.Mr.-Bill and jndge Al- len, generalship; emphasized the affirmation. "We talked of the present." session of con- gress from "the attitude of these mem- bers of the republican party whom the newspapers pleased to call' 'Insur- gents.' you go'lnto I prefer, that they "come from .TBII1. I 'am mncn pleased -with" the. result of my" visit with- Colonel, very modi v The sens-tor' paused "for a moment. recalling tlie nappenlngs- of thie- after- left his face be.-sald. 1m- ,_ yon- that Colonel vtftt tne? slowly, and Jilg- Partly cloudy, f skowenby Ugkt, variable tttmtm, Lowest Highest temperature Normal Rainfall Ip 24 Denciency since flrst of month (Inches) Excess- since Jan. 1 from Stations and State of Weather. ncb.es. Atlanta, pt. Augusta, clear Boston, cloudy .00 .04 Buffalo, rain Baltimore, cloudy.. Birmingham, clear. Charleston; cloudy. Charlotte, cloudy Chattanooga, clear. Chicago, clear Cincinnati, 82 78 80 7Z if 82 82 7> .00 .00 .00 .00 M 1.14 Corpus Denver, clear .Detroit, pt. cloudy. Oalveston, clear -Huron, clear Jacksonville, pt cl. Jupiter, cloudy Kansas City, clear. Key -West, clear... Knoxvllle, clear Los. Angeles; pt. cL Memphis, M 14 71 81 8! 68 84 88 84 82 86 '72 .01 .00 .00 -SO .00 .00 Mobile, .Cloudy New Orleans, Mouflyl. 74 New -York, cloudy. Norfolk. j 80 Omaha, clear .....j ,T Palestine, rain 74 jjortland.' Me., rain; 86 yW W 1 Raleigh, clear ...j W Savannah, San clear St. rain ,74 St. Paul, clear 9t Tampa. -cloudy Thomasvllle, pt. j   

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