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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: December 31, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - December 31, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               THE ATLANTA" CONSTITUTION VOL. XXII. ATLANTA, GA., WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 31, 1890. PRICE FIVE CENTS. HOAE IS BATTLED TT THE KJETOTsT Of JT.TS COL- WOLCOTT SPEAKS HIS MIND BOLDLY, tad Teller tad Halo Join Him i orce Bill Fairly Torn to Pieces. Other News December has never been i day in the senate like thlS It was a succession of day of ex- Dlovoni To the eai of Graimj Hoar it was the eiplonon of na U OF bombs that carried death and destruction to Ins hobby At nrst he was nervous then fr ghtened and then terrorized, until he imagined himself veritably within a "chamber of bell Around tbo old ma i s bead the hombs Jell thick and 'ast, until the ,jag rule and force bill were torn .o fragments and poor old Hoar hardly knew ft bather lie -was in the senate chamber or being riddled with bullets and burned at tlie stake by his ever present imaginative mob of south- ern demonats IHE l-UN BEGIN0 When the senate met Hoar had no idea what the day would bring forth He believed it would bo a repetition of the dry debates of the past twenty-one daya He concluded his speech of yesterday by citing irauy imagina- tive outrages upon southern republicans A republican official's life was not safe in the south, he taid, and then dramatically ex- claim od How long, long, Oil God, shall the olood of these martyrs cry for vengeance from She ground How long shall the murder of men because they are republicans be the onJv crime to which are indifferent "With this Hoar took his seat and gazed for nods of approval from his colleagues. They came not A BOMB EXPLODES Instead, a bomb exploded at his feet, and the vrulo it old sinner rushed for the cloak- room The bomb fell from the lips of that young1 senator from Colorado, Edward O Wolcott, when he arose ana said "I jm opposed to this bill, and shall i oto against it Tbat these words should follow his appeal without warning, and come from Wolcott, a native of Massachusetts, was too much for Hoar, and he and Edmunds hastily fled to the cloakroom But Wolcott is a man of courage He has all been opposed to the bill, and had the nerve to say BO Wol cott 1s a magnificent specimen of manhood and a natural orator Wnenhetookthertooreverj senator entered the hall the galleries quickly filled and members of the house hastened to the senate chamber "W olcott did not mince words He wnnt straight to the point and made tbe stiongeat and most powerful attack on the bill yet delivered It was a master piece of oratory, the ablest argument and greatest speech heard in the senate in He absolutely tore the force bill to fragments and deservedly censured those who liave been pushing it as will bo seen from tbe S3 below TiV hen he compared the Chi- iie r of tbe with tbe negro sontbt rod said if the Chinese were allowed tc 311 Colorado mountains only inspired freedom and of justice, and i the Chi nese '-ote w as opposed to tho united and intel gcjit white Mite tl e white %ote m some waj anil bj some u othod would govern, there I round applause except from tbe few parti sftti republicans w ho are pushing this bil Tt w a- i source t f git at legret, said Mr Wo1 coct at called npc u to any con sulerabie number of his paicy and decline to take ti e patTl which the older heads ooiuted out IHt. CUPATEU When Mr tt i onclaied all tbe sen a tors'tilt tlio for tho c'oakrooms to discuss Ihe Affect of the It had creittxl tae icnsation of the session but was only like tl e cxplos on of a l recracker to tl e bomba that followed Oi course for awhile theie a calm as tu ed in by short speeches from Senator Stow 11% of on fiee coinage, and by Senator of on the force bill and tho fnancia condition of the country Tn the meantime Senator Hoar 1x2 ti rned to tha caa r ing regained Ins self-compos are t j 21 LI KR 1 1HE TLOOR 1j in tbe second bomb oxplodt a and from that ti c o was. t Central 1 ouibi umcnt of rlia Md-.s.3 miij and bis ct bill and woiuleifi j ate it ah CUDC from the roj ubhcau side faenUor Tei ei, of Colorado it was w ho throw t ic second bomb lie tommencid ictioii than t1 e senate chamber as u bv m tgic iiiMeil It w is 11 me ho said, calnilv aud dehboiatcly po nt- ing is it Sena or Hou, tliat t ie seua- tf r from V v achuhetts deciding what, he to do He has attempted to hurry matter, while he Xnous il e country is en the verge-cf ipmic, and wants financial ''egis ation Ho baa occupied two dais in a hisuori nnision and not m disctu-s iig this "b '1 is a notion in mv country that us is doing tins to off ueedea xtion He then went 011 to say that Hotir had promised to arnrii I t, bat instead vantod to pi sh a clofrare rule to gag deua.e and traditions of the senate lie wonted to we how the bi'l to be amende 1, because if it w 13 iiot amended to sait him be would oppose it Then 1 e added "I am prennrod to ic-u t by all proper tho adoptioi of a cloturo uutil TO an opportu nty to on amei d eu "U> on th s bul dt ponds upon e amendments As to tlio delay 310 oie 11 ore robponoible for it the senator from 1 h s brought; Hoar to hif. feet to say he was ing for tlie senate to pass a financial bill J f> 'V-ad not kept the o 11 before tlie s to pro eit financial legisl tins Senator lellcr warmed up anu ro ieu that whether it -was true or not, icnn o it ant? po ut- 4 4nger at Hoar, ho wild 'Ihere is elation th s country needs moie than this r boon platforms, but no republi- has agreed to vote for any bill up in 13 c t j of !New York and brought here Hoar nogan to squirm 1 hoix Teller put m uj il g} t bv can d as tbo se irom Mas'Kicb.u- s d n ipains- tins bul Itw as t j iUally drastic measure to the one lie t i_-jt, which did not in erlere xviih the rights states as mich as tins He then found i jn'-istant to vote against the bill, as I wll f it consistent to vote against tins I pro- r uo independent in this matter i he spoke of the necessity of getting t bill out of the Tay and legislate to iu a tinaucial pan c "tnat I put dollars and centa -st human liberty, bat irithout prosperity t. ro can be no liberty We have had iwo months to pass this bill. Two measures were here together last session, this and tne tariff bill One toached human lib- erty, the other the almighty dollar. Nine- tenths of the senators of body laid iside this bill for the dollar another econom- ical measure question, en more importint, is before this body, and the Massachusetts sena- tor he is for revolution to piss this bill. "If you are determined to pass this he eiid, addressing Hoar, "stay hero day and night -uid do it Has it come to pass that ease and comfort are to jou above duty Do like the majority lias always done heretofore By this time Hoar was completely rattled AM> HALE COMES UP Eut he became almost wild when Senator Hile of next took the floor scored him for not doing Ins dutj Somvtur Toliei s romarks about the- repub- lican senators uUbustenng and leaving the senate to break a quorum, and defeat a meas- ure, created a panic among the gatf-rule men, but it was true ind not a word conldbe said in reply THF ATTITLDK Ol THB OEMOCHATS During tight of the republican? the -democrats remained silent, but upon every face was a broad smile Bach and every one them were delighted, for the fight was now a republican fight, and the chances are Wal- cutt Teller and fatewart will be reinforced by other western republican senators, who will speak out against the force bill and gig rnlo Paddock and Plumb and Pettigrew and Far- well, and Don Cameron and Jones, of and otners, are expected to fall m line to fight the gag Ingalls will likewise be with them, if he letnrns in time, and the fight promises more interest yet Bnt not until Tuesday ill any move to adopt the gag rule ard the force bill be made Then the cnsis will be reached, and somebody must go down into defeat loday's proceedings would indicate that the mlamoas bill and the outrageous gag ruIS will go to their doom and drag the Hobby form of tbe Massachusetts granny with them The day's debate ran as follows Senator Wolcott's Speech. Mr Wolcqtt said it was a source of great re- gret to him to be called upon to differ with any considerable number of bis party, and to de chne to take a path which older leaders pointed out It was propor that the reasons which im- pelled that difference be fairly stated Tbe time which the -bill engrossed was not oppor- tune iN early one-third of the session, was through ana dajlight was not yet wsible. There were before the senate measures of %ast importance that would fail, for another year at least, uijless they weie now acted upon IMPORTANT MEASURES -rArmong the measures awaiting action, Mr "Wolcott mentioned tho silver bill, the appor tfbnrnent bill, tlm pure food bill, the copyright, bill anfl tne private land court bill "We stand, he in tbe shadow of a financial dis- aster The people turn to congress for relief They want the assurance either that there will be no legislation on a hnancial subject (so that they can set their house in or tbat they will receive an adequate medium of circula- tion for the transaction of their business Bjit it waa not only, he said, because these meas- ures were clamoring for recognition that he felt compelled to oppose the passage of the election bill If the session w ore to last indefi- .and tboso. vital moasoxea- were pending, ho would still voteagainst it It was a travesty on duty that the senate bhould sit, day ifter day, discussing changes in an elec- tion law that had stood without amendment for twenty jeais In his opinion the pending bill should not become a law because it olved federal interference ind evpionago at other than national e 3 ec tions, and such interferences was contraiy to the spirit of tbo American mstitu- bions, and an obstacle to the right enjoyment of American liberties It was, to his mind, far better thit local and state elections in the city of York, with its thousands of igiionnt, criminal and venal should be attended by fraud and dis honest j, than that they should be kept pure by rederal interference They had tried, in Colo- ndo the remedy of federal interference under the direction of a democratic district attorney and a democratic marshal The law hid been administered by a judge who was so intolerably fur that he was oppused to both p irtie1? and jet it had been given up, and now the people of Colorado minaged their own elect, impartially and incorrupt- rtlv The people of the United States, Mr Wolcott went 011 to say wanted no more cml btufe, arid it would be impassible to enfuice such a law ignnst tho muled opposition of the white popu anon in tho southern states The attempt would bring back the old days of tcr and the weaker race would be the suftYni There were many things more im- poitarit ind "vital to the "welfare of the nation than that the co'ored citizens of tbe south should cast their ballots riiE WOLL.D WIH referring tu the quest on piiE by Mr KustiE, some weeks to Mi Dolph as to what tlio peo pjo of Oregon mid do under similar circum tances if tee Chinese otera were iu a, majority m that state, Mr "Wolcott baid Mr Dolph s in swergLemtil He -would not, speak for Oregon, but he gave it as solemn opinion that if in Colo- i ado w hose mountains inspired only Jreedom ami love justice and where tho repub Ii< Tti party Mail as a in proportion E its as KauTS or Nebraska, iia i in their tucitl [Quiet the deiuo such a condition ot afEurs existed, and it t IB Cluiitise vote waj opposed to the united and intelligent vote tne white In uul by some method, would govern. [Den o atit, ipp-oval He not intormed that in any southern state itri. w "iij in< lination to legislate against, tlic coloicd man or that,  f tiio HOI til -woul 1 bo hardlv afa ucoiniiiou i were low Lho of the times pointed un met il I; to scrioiid differpnues unong them, and i tlit-se diff reurts bee uue solidmed, the colored vof r iv jultl be in dcroai d He could to wait so long; ah he he wis protected in life uud propertv nd so could the republican partv v -lit. H the republicans had o> ery southern raeiulerot tlie next b mse -eprcbeiitatives they would btill be sin rt oi i from now ihcntbe beneficent tariff iw li.i-4 li i i t me (o denj its isdoni thej oul cd the of tlie southern re ubhcan representation ivhiUi the lull sought to TO I FT THE SOUTH ALONC. But there wit. another iml weightier reason wh> in his omnion tlie bill should lie defeated lor a quarter of aeputurv, out from poverty ard despair.thB 1 ad been reaclimgiortninanef- fort to p ant if foot on tho solid of mateial i tj ind 111 the mtrvoHms groivth and ttion now takinj, pHce in the state" it uould lie lie uum-e ind unp itri tic lor to m tericre in -lie conduct iiitcraal lie-li n 5 hope f< r imuicdiate politi cal roteneratitn of tliataectit hut that aid not aliect the question Iho pcop ot tho states notonlyregaimut, ilieiroldpro-perity, but leaving it lar tchiud Lnder the conditions, to effective labor, handicapped with e mntless d Badxin- they hid out and up into the TJiev had won tht- conudeuce of iiorthcrn capitalists andealibted the udofnorth- rrn there was .10 courtrj tl at blossomed tod.rs under brighter ttiin Uie south 1 of Mianfcind ad shou-n uosucli va Jid awaken ito3oicing in the prosperity of every section of the common qoontry, he Wolcott) "was tm willing to intrude with jua vote on tbat people at thH time, a measure which seemed to them but i renewilof the strife ind which was loreipa to the spirit and diUKerous to the free doin ot republican institutions (Oenenl ip plause in the galleries and on the democratic side  ute upon amendments. He did not that the people ot the Lmltett States were prepared for this proecedmc and for one ho wis prepared to resist all the adoption of tbe rule until the senate li id an oppi rtunirs to ote upon nil the To repeat whether bo would oto ior the bill or not depended on the result of the vote on era! umendrnentB, he was not to be deterred from liia objeet because of delay Because ftobody was more ro-pnnsiWo for that del iy than the BentitorS who lavored tint bSlU Mr i oiler caid he did not appreciate until this afternoon effect of the proposed rule which lie understood w is to come up ior ictnm on Tuesday next It had not occurred to him that the senate be in tlie position of having to vote on. a bill -without 111 opportunity to vote upon amend- ments The senator indicated ttmt the rule did not mean this, but the legisl itii e condition of tho senate would be one of inability to vote upon amendments If the frignda of the bill w era Sir earnest they could pass ic without They could pass it %3 WHs had befn pnesed in tfce flayd of they had been patted before and during tho war He had never bliown any indfca tioii to abandon senators who in this measure by absenting himself, even though he might not be willing to support the bill by his vote Air Hale said that the situation had become to some republican senators who expected "to sap port the bill and vote for it if toe opportunity were given them ilmost intolerable llie senate was not withou experience in dealing with im pnrtant measures It could not be said of this bill (important that it that it in nnportaucQ above all measures wblch agitated tho country ind senate during the last thirtv The senate hereto fore had been able to complete and ere it and it oupht leirned by this time whether the methods which then pre% ailed could now ind take the out ot the rut into which it had fallen Somebod> ought t l 110w w hether the old methods ot the Rtnato c uld divaf war measures ha 1 botu bitterlv op posed in the senate but those measures had been passed Allot the reconstruction aets hidinttwith determined hostilitj jcttheviiad been enacted into law this time it ought to be 1 noun whether old methods would pass the pending bill, but thcj hn.d not been tried The benator was not trwng the fold method nor the new method which some senators thought must be r sorted to He didn t Know irom ai thintj that had occurred uixm tht> othci side whether the democratic senator i had determined to report to nndue meiiij tJdeteatttie bill Noth ing h id it 1 ong speeches 111 hti active fapeeoiies, hail been m ule on liiles I ut he could not 1 now until the matter wifa brought to the the faen i orb on the otlier "ide hid deter minnd upon iny ex train dinarv prot bt adfast demotion oC the senitor from to thia cansc, lie woul it the tin n ha I come when the senator should timl out whan ought to bo done Mi lIo.rbLuUlitt if he hit hid his. wiv the pendinir moa uio v.oull been brought forward session and eomo measure ior dosing debate we uld Leen adopted. It had been in opposition Eo his tliat that hid not been done He undertook to say the Iniurj raused to the pemlmc measure by the rtpee lies of the senators from idiand f oloratlo and had not been half is much an obstacle in the of accomplishing what he believed ,0 be the desire of the lepublican party f the country is the fact thai republican sen ntors left the ehamber ic o c ock in the afternoon or were paired Ht, reminded Mr Hale that when there was in attempt to an evening session for co-iblderation oi the bill almost all the democratic sentU'rs got up and walked out of their seats into the lobb> Mr were only twenty five repub lioans sen itors or was one of them Mr M> was I but I think that tho senatci from Maine maj have learned somtithing the i in refeieuce to tl c derelictions of his repub hcin associates and the purposes ol his democratic antagonists Mr Mitchell here to tho greit fiction inii ent ot t he democratic senators that it wis in order for senate to tiljtmn, BO u.t there migl t be u republican confcrenre Morton Will Dirty Work. "V ice President Morton made the statement todij that he would not be i pirty to any ont- rago upon fhe rules of the senate Ho further more said he did not feel eilled upon to lower his dignity by takinjr a trip to Florida, in order that some senatoi may be placed in tho chair to arbitrarily chicg< the rules Such a course had been suggested but lie intended to remain here and ci i tinue to pres de over tlie senate fairly ana Morton is not a man who can bo a tool of by partisan gang The Norfolk and Western The Norfolk and "Western railroad has pnr- chised a toiitro'l of the Shonandoab Valley, and have gnen ouGa contract to bu Id into abhington froni somewhere near Lnray. Tho coma-act provides for tbe completion ot the road witlim a yeir They have aiso con- tracted with the I'ennsylMiL.t. rn'rorutomn into their dopot here As tlte Shcnauc oak alley road an extension oE tlio East 1 en- nebseo, Virgmii and Georgia, this will Atlanta another direct line to "Washington and York. It is aiso given out today, npon good anthonty, tbat, at tha next meeting of tbe tors of the Central, it will be. OiiAHA, December oO The Boo 3 corres- pondent at the camp on Wounded Kuce creek, telegraphs as follows concerning yesterday's battle In the morning, as aoon as the ordinary mili- tary work of the early day was done, Major AVIuteside determined upon disarming the In diana at once, and at C o clock tho camp of Big surrounded by the Seventh Cavalrj and TiyJor's scouts The Iiidianb were sitting in a Half-circle Four guns were placed upon i lull about 200 jards distant. Kvurv preparation was made not especially to tight, but to show the Indians the futility of resistance WOULD NOT GIVE UP THEIR GUNS They seemed to recognize tins fact, and Major "Whlteside ordered them to come out twenty at a time aiidgne np their arms, they caine but not with their guns m sight. After the nrst twenty, but two or three dis- played arms These they gave up sullenlj, and observing the futility of tins mode ol pro- cedure, Major Whiteside ordered ft detach- ment of K and A troops on foot to outer the tepees and search them THK TRKAckFUOUS RFD3 This work had hardly been entered upon wlien the 120 desperate Indians turned upon the soldiers, who were gathered closely about the tepees, and immediately a storm of firing poured npon the military It was as though the order to search had been the signal. latter, not anticipating any such ac tiou, had been gathered in very closely, aud the first firing was terribly disastrous to them. THE SOLDIERS ZK EARMIST The reply was immediate, however, and in an, instant it seemed that the draw in which the Indian camp was set was a sunken Vesu- vius. The soldiers, maddened at the sight of their falling comrades, hardly ai tod the com- mand, and in a moment the whole front was a of lire, ibove winch tbe smoke rolled, obscuring the central bcone from view THEY FELL OV ALL SIDES Through this horrible curtain single Indians could be seen at times ing before the fire, but after the first discharge from tho carbines of the troopers tbero were few of them left. Tbey fell ou all sides like grain in the course of the scythe Indians and soldiers lay to- gether, and the wounded fought on the ground Off through the diavt toward the a few remaining warriors lied, turning occasion- plly to fire, but now evidently caring more for escape than battle THE WOtTNDFD TIGHT Tbe wounded Indians seemed possessed of the courage of devils. From the ground, where they had fallen, they continued to fire till their ammunition was gone or till killed by tbe soldiers Both sides forgot everything excepting only loading and discharging guns It was only in ftte curly part o! tbo rffeuy tliatJhniid-to-htnti fighting was seen Caibmes wore clubbed, sabres gleamed, and war cluba circled in the air and came donn like thunderbolts But this WJS cnly for a abort time The Indians could not stand that storm from tho soldiers they had hoped to It was only a stroke of life before death FOB AV INDIA'S TO SHOOT The rerniiaut tied and the battle became a bunt It was now that the artillery was called into requisition Before, the fighting was so close that the gun? could not be trained With out danger of death to the solaieri, Now, with the Indians flying where they might, it was easy to reach them. Gatlmg and Hatchkisa guns were trained, and then began heavy firing, which lasted half an hour, with frequent y volleys of musketry and cannoi It was a of extermination now with the troopers It tras difficult to restrain tho troops laities were almost abandoned About the onlv tactics was to kill while it could be done. Wherever an Indian could be seen, down the creek and up over the bare hills they v ere followed by the artillery ind musketry fire, and for several minutes the engagement went on until not a e Indian was in sight. Another Engagement, A Bee's from Rushville, Neb says Advices from the seat of war gne news of mother encounter between the troops and Ipdia.ii3 at within foul milca of tho agency Tlie and 3S tilth CUA airy were just coming In from 5 csterday's bat- tlefelil, lollo-ned at some dis- tance bv their provision tram On reaching the point named, a Jarge bind of Indians, headed by Chief Two Strike, dashed suddenly upon the ciptured It, and were miking off towards the- Bad JLanda when the cavalry and gai-e pursuit In the battle which followed, thirty Indi ins were wounded, but no soldiers vere killed CAN Aanr BE Accordinir to the latest report Two Indians bad un to j esterday been considered peaceable and subdued but their sudden chance of mind causes the gravest feirs here thit peihaps none of the fao-called frlendlies can be relied upon er, word from General Brooks to tho bottlers today is somewhat reassuring, it being to the effect that a great body of the savages have remained loyal all the while, and that nearly all the rpbels dead He further the auctleia here are not now in danger THF CAPTIVE INDIANS Tehaulo news is also at hand that Colonel Henry is now aopioaelung tbe agency with 700 Indians, captured in the Bad Lauds This is believed to include all of the rebels on the reserv ation, and hopes are entertained of a speed v settlement It has cost the of about J50 Indians, twenty-nve or thirty sol- dieri killed and wounded to effect this, if in- deed it may be said that peace is yet estab- lished Tlie bodv of tbe gallant Caotam "W allace, and other dead soldiers, armed! here at noon from the agency, and will be shipped to Fort Kobmso'i, the nearest military post Han Into the Express BvLmiOEL, December   morning, ran into the rear of an6tlier M ash- ington express liaK an hour later, at Annapolis Junction, where It wis waiting another train ahead, v.hicli Lad -jcen stopped bv the of air lire Twi> hat can on the rear tbo axnress, containing theatrical bcenory, and tlie loconiotne of tlie reir trt .1 were somewhat damaged, tirs man Coursey, of the latter was cut abotttlie head ind otherwise slightly injured in Jumping from his cab Travel was interrupted. BOTH IN THE WOODS. Hand. TOPKKA. Kas Decemtcr JO benator Inpralls j here yebtcrclay from Accliiaon, .ind went directly to Copland lie engaged roimia j f >ra i icmtti He manage his o-nn campaign i for re Th3 j-a uiern Alliance managers ire A good aeal disturbed over the activity of Insalis a camp tifni A caucub of alliance members or the legislature lias called to meet ou January 1st, tbe even- ing before tbe assemblage of the legislature. The Sad Fate ot a Teunesseee Kail- Toad NISHMU.E, Tenn December [Special "Wnen Judge Jackson appointed a receiver lor tlie Decdtur, Chesapeake and Iscw Orleans railroad some weeks ago its atraln were Icnown, to be in i very bad condition Just how bad was shown when Receiver L. Frierson filed his report in the I nited States circuit The road was in- tended to run ee ventj -eight miles from Dte catur, Ala., to SheHnvilie, Tenn Tort> three miles of the road is complete but both ends are in the woods There is enough ma tcrial in hand to complete tbe road, but dol- lar s w orth ha.s been attached by the creditors The total indebtedness is about 000 ments to tae amount of SlOO have ilreadv been becurcfi, and faints are pending for All the company s rolling stock is also in tbe re bands Hie American Loan and Trust Companv, of "New ork, holds a largo amount of the company's hrst mortgage "bonds Seems to Be a Success aa a Railroad Mftnajrer. b C, December 30 In the United States circuit court today, an order ibsued Receiver Chamberlain, of the South Carolina railw ay, to pay out of tbe ntt earnings of tlio road the coupons, with interest from maturity pajable April J, Tliese are coupons of the Jirst CQnsoltdated mortgage bonds The recen ens further ordered to pay all install- ments oi interest tnat may occurred or may occur up to Jai uarv 1 1803, on all obligations of tlie railway t ompany secured bj n lien prior to tho Hen of the first mort' ige consoldatett bonds Ihe, bonds of the I iHc, Cincinnati and Ohirleston held 1 II I Oogblan, are cxcepted from tbe tciiim ot this order Tlie net timings of the road under tlie receiver s administration were an increase of over the previous >fiar CHOICE r Hit ASKS ICXCHA3SGED A Typical aian from the WcBt f Throws Aronnd. RjiLFiGn, C December 30 The topic of tallx today baa been the editorial attack of Toe State Chronicle upon Editor lairbrother, of The Durham Globe In repl> to a savage at- tack 05 tbe latter upon Rev Bajlus Cade editor of The Progressive Farmer, The Globe said tbat Editor Cide lied like a hotbe tlilef, and The Chronicle says Una is blackguard journalism and that Fditor J airbrother is a Hal and scoundrel It all to make the leading sensa tiou'ot the season Editor talrbrotber is from Colorado, ind took eiiargo of The Ortobe three months ago. He is a tjpjcal western THEY PUNCHED Parnell and O'Brien Hold' a Conference in BoiTLOCTsn, December 3p Messrs O'Brien and Gill arrived this morning from Amiens and Mr Paruell came from Follceston at 3 o clock p m accompanied by John and "W Hliam Redmond Clancy and Kenny, all members of parliament, and iiicent bcully, who was defeated at komij. and Editor O'Beirne, of The Frceidaii's Journal OParneU and O Brlcn met in a IfiJlcl, held t hour s conference in a private, room and alterwarUs luncbed together, secminii on cry good terms Aothing luis been leornodrof vluit transpired at the conlerence Newspaper men arc mustered iu force about tbe hotel SHOOTING A Mr. Glllesple Was a Trillc Too Glib December At AlArf a -voting contractor, waa allot loiir times and fatally wounded Jolm Hughes, and after he loll i liistol was placed la Gilleaple a hands by a friend and he shot Hughes three times but the extent of the latter a Injuries are unknown Hughes and Gillespie had been vlsitinp tlie same vountc lady, and the latter had of a rumor that riughes had negro blood in hi8 -veins, and tho stoivwas repeated to Huahes by the young and he started out to hunt up Gillespie and he fauud him, and tho result was as btated above The Sun's Cotton Article. JSKW December 30 Suns cot- ton article saya luturcs were buojant till near the close when speculation became quieter, closing steadj at 2 to 5 points advance Seijtem ber 11 points advance from yesterday s closing prices Liverpool advanced from to 4 1C poiufc, mid lose it Our market responded with a. fair degree of spirit to the better report trom Liverpool. and toott little notice of reaction there The Liverpool market seems to have been 01 er sold from this side and unsettled the markets for exchange together with 1 trge portions of low grades coining for w trd, have prevented our sellers Irom making delivery Inev have, therefore, been compelled to uuy in Liverpool, and cause j, bull movement in the market But we must have a larger relative movement of the crop and great accummulation of stocks here be- fore any further decline ot moment can be recb- octed npoii Spot cottpn_was dull A Fool with a "Cliild Wife." NASHVILLE Tenn December 30 [SpecLU From that part of Williamson county known as tlie birren, conies tho story of the imfaitbiul- nefis of a clnld-wife and her disappearance illiani married a tmrteen-year-old girl named Ella Tolmson about eighteen months sinc-c A short while ago, usly stories began to float around and finally Mangum discovered that his wife w is uufaithtul, ne making the while a man named Linden was a  another little daughter, who had presence of mind to throw a blanket aruand her and smother tlie flames Tlio Not So Great. RAI FIGH N C December 30 fSpecial was tonig-it to Mtnd the engines of the Seaboird Air line which were burned here to ruamoutli A a repaired Tlie oiheers of the road tlie loss will be for less than they at feared it would be The Merchant is Miesinff. DeremLerSO Hie y Jiice haiea received notice that Peter i well to do merchant of this city his been mns- in" from Jiis home last Thursday last seen he had In Ui3 pocket, and foul play is expected.____________ TO UVK. OU TO DIE0 THE LONDON FIRE. That the (Question Critics KaSse About O'2-nsill's New Play. Mr Janaes O NciIFs production of the famous play The Dead Hejirt' has given rise to noC a little newspaper ccntrovfeBj The issue as Landry, die, or should ha not die01 In Tlie Dead Heart, as "Mr p'ayed it, Laiulrv made to he apou the KUilIotine Mr i) "Seill the solo r .Jit to produce the Ir- mj -vcm in but in one de d t blicL tn the teit- He lets Landry live. Tliat seeius to be one secret of great popn- ianty of >lr. O e production. Tbe people an in letting the liero lire. THE HARD WORK OF THE FIREMEN. nufactories S 1 iro Orifiiuated Gener ept Away How tlie 1 ureiffn Ncn-s lly LONDON, December terrible coofla- Eration is now, 2 o clock p m raginir in tins city The ficene ot tho firo is in Queen Victo- ria and 1 names streets near Black Fnar'3 bridge Numerous warehouses ore blaring and London aeema destined to suffer one of tbe largest and most destructive fares in its history of recent years Fourteen fire engines were soon upon the spot and the firenjen did their utmost but little success to chocfc the course of the .flames A high w ind was blowing and it ma- terially added to the furv of the flames while hindenner the firemen in their efforts to e property 'iemble sheets of flame and clouaa of smoke were constantly whirling the strugg'mctiretnen, who met with Jittleorno success m their "battle with the herv element-. The large w holcsale fu inantifartt >ry t f Bevillon, e-ctending from 127 to 14J Queen Victoria btreet was --aid to be doomed shortly after the firo gamed a strong headwav Folio wing this news w is Che information that A lartje paper w arehouse a number of fancj goods stores and the Gulcher F ei trie Lighl and Power Company's building woio also s complete to the rlamcsi Tl e rlarne spread rapidU 011 a'l sules as if there were no firemen or lire engines present 1OI R BTOCIvS APLAZE X pon the authority of London lire bngale clnef-s upon the scene of disastei it is an nouiiced that the lire originated in a buildniQ bj G Davidson hon paper and paper felt manufacturer and paper manufacturers at IM Queen Victoria- street Tins building extended back into upper Thames street It was j, structure and was completely gutted as was also that of Adolph Frankan Ci of pijiesand impt rtcisof tobacco atlSlQueen old st Bpiiit's-cliurch between No 1-3 and L pper Thames street The famous Welch church also caugh1" hre fie b ip'injbtecple forming cue of the most sink uiK tho temblcbcene Ihe hrenreii at one linie inauagod to obtain control of theifctiauuaat tins point nd tLe coniiagra- tioii so far ad tat Benit, w ior a time ar- rested Atthe hour of sendintr tins dispatch, 4 Gfl %fa o cKick, p m whno would be termed in ]New York four large blocks of buildings are in flames and burumg steadily They will all to judge from present appearances, be gutted by the flames A BThe caiisc of the firs i" nnl nn n and the amount oE damaeo done is now to. be or J OOO WESTERN A VN 1C >IATTEKS Several Cars rst Tbroucli TrnSn Leaver at 1 31 O Oct..' "VI The old tr uoral of crs I ti e enurn and Vt c eaniig i p shfftlng a tliit tbe n e pecs o the road arc going to no time in putting tlie >ards rolhne stock aiwj buildings in iirst clahs shaje on t p a f im li r of tlie main bulletin, jeste'-clav Tlioma v u tO pS 1 u t witli w d. t BJ a e before him w s littered, and to Mr Pardon of tlie operating department v.h was with him One of the iirbt things I want vou to do is to clean up that and the o walked to limit up some other place where improvements could be instituted Two brand new coaches were brought in at f 40 o cloek last evening Tliev were built by the Ohio tails Car Companj of Jcffers Jnville, Ind, and are models of the car builder s art They are tin shed in the interior in polished cherry ,ara heated by the Baker heater and Illuminated by ealctj oil lamps The seats are as com ement and eomfortable as possible with their reversible slanting Lacks and soft plusb seats lomorrow morning at 7 50 o clock there will start for Nashville a passenger train, almost en tirtly new It will consist of a new engine, new baggage new mail and three passenger cars, two of which are new and aPullinj.ii parlor chair car The flrtt through passenger tram for Nashville will pull out trom the union depot at 1 35 o cloclc this aiternoon, under choree of Conductor John Mays few minor changes of schedule will be made under the uew recline President Ihomas was 111 consultation with fauper- intcndent Anderson ior some time over tlie matter yebterday afternoon but no den- iiite conclusion was reached as to where tliej feliouia bo made THE FACTS I3i THE CASK Captain EnR-liah Says the Rumors Concern- in u the Colaxnbns Southern Are Untrae The Midland Gulf and Columbuf Southeinra Iroarts not been consolidated at has been stated said Captain J W English; vice prpsident ol the latter road Neither road owns a cent interest in the Tlie Georgia Midland and Gulf is 100 miles long, and the Columbus Southern eiphtv eight miles in length and the two together lorm a continuous line extending Irom to Albany Tuey have simply combined for mutual advantage, and in order to economize consolidating of the offices the general offices of both roads being in Colnmban The executive, financial and accounting departments ivill, as before remain d stinct. the heads of the consolidated oflices the following names have been mentioned Oencril manager G Gnnby Jordan, chief engineer, V S Greene, superin- tendent. M JL. Grax general freight and passen- ger apcnt Clifton A joint meeting ill be licid at Columbus Sat- urda> at which tlae business vill bo of and tlie jiositious I named hllcd. is merel> a reciprocal traffic ar- rangement between the roads, wherein following the example set bj the other roads outside of tlio al Bvstem who re.il- fzr tlievmnst hustle in company if want tc get a bhare of Jic siutlicrn and passenger traffic______ TELEGRAPH' BREVITIES. Li Tiernan, a retired of Baltimore dead. General Spinner is sinking raj idly and will die in a few hourb Tlie thermometer was ten degrees below zero in L radO" yettcrdav The Scotch railroad strike is breaking owing to defections Thcoplielus B oft e Philadelphia pub- lishing hoube ib dead Tl e failure of E Dubedat Son bro- kers of Dublin Jn land is anuounceu K- F Taylor of a i esvil t r a has teen ap- pointed associate of tliat Ulr O Connor the waa entertiined at dinner In Kichmondjesterdaj I If 'U o It ia announeed in lork that the i c will al thu uat a, Jff ncial Jar Tteceipcsnf tiaii cotton to tlatr ammnt to 2 "00 OJOcaalcre, ica.iii') "00 JJO carters tlje cor- responding date last 3ca" A half interest in tic odist Advocate, in Chattanoo has been sold to furace E, Warner ofCed-irtal la The neannc of the wr t apamst Clcra. Tewett oj tha Hainpsm-e ot rtrre'-ent.itivea haa been postponed nnt 1 H C .larks A. Co goods merchants of Hi na can abfcignment. Lia- bilities 000 -4000) TheiMtecf f the r2 etuploiC" ke m mm es to ir prove Irofc p( tf the railn ad eorporatione T'ie trade council oi Jflnningriiam has pointed committee to abonr a conference between tne ntnkjng coal miners and coal tora, and, if possible, eetUe the strte SPAPLRl iWSPAPFJ   

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